Is there an official Church interpretation of Revelation?


#1

I found out several ones like:

-Historicist, which sees in Revelation a broad view of history;

-Preterist, in which Revelation mostly refers to the events of the apostolic era (1st century), or—at the latest—the fall of the Roman Empire;

-Futurist, which believes that Revelation describes future events (modern believers in this interpretation are often called "millennialists");

-Idealist, or Symbolic, which holds that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil;

-Paschal liturgical interpretation: This interpretation considers the liturgical worship, particularly the Easter rites, of early Christianity as background and context for understanding the Book of Revelation's structure and significance. In form is structured after creation, fall, judgment and redemption. Those who hold this view say that the Temple's destruction (70 AD) had a profound effect on the Jewish people, not only in Jerusalem but among the Greek-speaking Jews of the Mediterranean. It's believed The Book of Revelation provides insight into the early Eucharist, saying that it is the new Temple worship in the New Heaven and Earth.

Is there an official interpretation and date of that book ( before 70AD or 95 AD)?


#2

[quote="fabio_rocha, post:1, topic:342550"]
I found out several ones like:

-Historicist, which sees in Revelation a broad view of history;

-Preterist, in which Revelation mostly refers to the events of the apostolic era (1st century), or—at the latest—the fall of the Roman Empire;

-Futurist, which believes that Revelation describes future events (modern believers in this interpretation are often called "millennialists");

-Idealist, or Symbolic, which holds that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil;

-Paschal liturgical interpretation: This interpretation considers the liturgical worship, particularly the Easter rites, of early Christianity as background and context for understanding the Book of Revelation's structure and significance. In form is structured after creation, fall, judgment and redemption. Those who hold this view say that the Temple's destruction (70 AD) had a profound effect on the Jewish people, not only in Jerusalem but among the Greek-speaking Jews of the Mediterranean. It's believed The Book of Revelation provides insight into the early Eucharist, saying that it is the new Temple worship in the New Heaven and Earth.

Is there an official interpretation and date of that book ( before 70AD or 95 AD)?

[/quote]

NO!

The Church only has an official interpretation of about 7 verses from the entire Bible.


#3

If there's no official interpretation then the argument that only the Church of Christ can interpret correctly the Word of God falls to the ground...


#4

The Church is the interpreter of the Christian Faith, not the official expositor of the Bible. The Church determines the meaning of Doctrine, that is where the magisterium is infallible, not an infallible commentator on Scripture. Catholics seem to get a blurred perception because there are so many debates from Protestants who argue from a Bible only mindset. Catholics need to not get trapped in the Protestant "bubble" of Bible alone, because in Catholicism we understand that the Christian Faith did not come from the Bible, but the Bible came from Christianity. There is no need for an official interpretation of the Bible, there are plenty of Catholic theologians from the last 2000 years that have dissected the Bible and have interpreted it for our edification. There is plenty of liberty and freedom to have multiple interpretations on about every passage in the Bible as long as it stays true to Catholic Doctrine. We don't need to argue Catholicism from Protestant grounds and principles, our turf is found in Scripture and Tradition.


#5

I believe it's all four Historicist, Preterist, Futurist, and Symbolic,** I AM NOT
SURE** about the "Paschal liturgical interpretation," not a Bible scholar here.

I don't know much, having been a revert, but I feel as though the Book of Revelation
is written in such a complex way SO AS TO cover MANY things in MANY different
ways concerning God's Plan.

I actually wonder how the Mormons work with
that book which seems very much in conflict
to their cosmology, theology, and doctrines?
http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon1.gif Mormons and Revelation (???)


#6

For Catholic views of the Book of Revelation, see Haydock's Commentary:

veritasbible.com/drb/compare/haydock/Apocalypse

haydock1859.tripod.com/

or the Catholic Encyclopedia:

newadvent.org/cathen/01594b.htm

or the US Conference of Catholic Bishops:

usccb.org/bible/revelation/0

See Pope Benedict's commentary:

vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/audiences/2006/documents/hf_ben-xvi_aud_20060823_en.html

catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=20995


#7

[quote="PaulfromIowa, post:6, topic:342550"]
For Catholic views of the Book of Revelation, see Haydock's Commentary:

veritasbible.com/drb/compare/haydock/Apocalypse

haydock1859.tripod.com/

or the Catholic Encyclopedia:

newadvent.org/cathen/01594b.htm

or the US Conference of Catholic Bishops:

usccb.org/bible/revelation/0

See Pope Benedict's commentary:

vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/audiences/2006/documents/hf_ben-xvi_aud_20060823_en.html

catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=20995

[/quote]

My "semi-official" interpretation of Revelation is "It's a pretty strange book!":shrug:


#8

[quote="COPLAND_3, post:4, topic:342550"]
The Church is the interpreter of the Christian Faith, not the official expositor of the Bible. The Church determines the meaning of Doctrine, that is where the magisterium is infallible, not an infallible commentator on Scripture. Catholics seem to get a blurred perception because there are so many debates from Protestants who argue from a Bible only mindset. Catholics need to not get trapped in the Protestant "bubble" of Bible alone, because in Catholicism we understand that the Christian Faith did not come from the Bible, but the Bible came from Christianity. There is no need for an official interpretation of the Bible, there are plenty of Catholic theologians from the last 2000 years that have dissected the Bible and have interpreted it for our edification. There is plenty of liberty and freedom to have multiple interpretations on about every passage in the Bible as long as it stays true to Catholic Doctrine. We don't need to argue Catholicism from Protestant grounds and principles, our turf is found in Scripture and Tradition.

[/quote]

Bravo, Bravo! :thumbsup:


#9

The position of the Church is that scripture is an inexhaustible source of revelation and inspiration. One consequence of that, simply put, is what did scripture mean 'then' and what does it mean now?

Those questions continue to occupy scholars and lay readers alike. Remember, scripture was not written for the scholars alone.

I recently read a book called "Coming Soon" which gave a complete and satisfying modern understanding of Revelation. I would say the volume covers the symbolism in Revelation.

I just got in the mail today, the volume on Revelation in the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture from Intervarsity Press. This series highlights patristic commentary on scripture. The editor of this volume has a very interesting overview of the volume in his Introduction. There, he explains the history of commentaries on Revelation and some of their respective points of view.
From reading just the Introduction this evening, I'm impressed about the allegorical interpretations of Revelation. One such allegory sets up a relation of the seven seals to the phases of Christ's life in which his ministry is revealed.

One of the ancient commentaries pointed out that one of the seven churches mentioned in the early chapters did not even exist, never existed; so, it's inclusion points to something else. Of course, there's a hint of a lot of speculation about the meaning of the millennialism. This ACCS volume has samples of commentaries from different time periods and locations (east and west).


#10

St Bede's commentary on the Apocalypse is available online, and so is Adso's.

There's also St. Beatus of Liebana's famous commentary from Carolingian times. There are Spanish and French full translations available, as well as Volume One of an English translation by M.S. O'Brien (over on Amazon). The second volume is available in unrevised form on O'Brien's blog.


#11

I believe (in general) the Roman Catholic Church leans in the direction of Amillennialism.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amillennialism

I am currently reading a pretty good commentary on the book of Revelation by Catholic Michael Barber.

amazon.com/Coming-Soon-Unlocking-Revelation-Applying/dp/193101826X

Overall, In Catholicism, I think Revelation is viewed as a liturgical book pointing to the Kingdom of God and worship (Mass). It's the "unveiling" of the Kingdom. It is really funny because I grew up in the "Late Great Planet Earth" era, and reading a Catholic commentary takes such a different approach to this book.


#12

[quote="ajcstr, post:11, topic:342550"]
I believe (in general) the Roman Catholic Church leans in the direction of Amillennialism.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amillennialism

I am currently reading a pretty good commentary on the book of Revelation by Catholic Michael Barber.

amazon.com/Coming-Soon-Unlocking-Revelation-Applying/dp/193101826X

Overall, In Catholicism, I think Revelation is viewed as a liturgical book pointing to the Kingdom of God and worship (Mass). It's the "unveiling" of the Kingdom. It is really funny because I grew up in the "Late Great Planet Earth" era, and reading a Catholic commentary takes such a different approach to this book.

[/quote]

catholic.com/documents/false-profit-money-prejudice-and-bad-theology-in-tim-lahaye%E2%80%99s-left-behind-series


#13

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