Is there an Order for the inept?


#1

If I were discerning a vocation to the religious life (I don't know yet), how could I serve? I have not been to college, my social skills aren't exemplary, I doubt that I would make a good teacher, and I have no desire for marriage (I have heard that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children, but are willing to give these up). I love the Church and would like to devote myself to Her, in whatever state of life that might be. Is there a place for someone like me?


#2

I'm sure you can find a place: we all have gifts!

Don't forget - your cake is a lie.:D

There's all kinds of orders/congregations out there.

For instance some contemplative orders have sisters/brothers who look after the property, grow the food, cook etc., so the contemplatives can pray.


#3

If there is an order of ineptitude, I should be Father Superior.:D

Some of the greatest Saints were not extremely talented people in the secular realm. Offer-up to God the talents you do have. Humility is a great virtue.


#4

Check out Venerable Solanus Casey, the porter of St Bonaventure! Note that a porter was part of the minor orders, which we no longer have. Nowadays, we have greeters and ushers, who are not ordained.

If we are open to God's will, we will never be inept.

Again he struggled academically, and his superiors had doubts about his calling. However, because his moral qualities were so outstanding, he was ordained on July 24, 1904. But there were limitations: He could not preach formal sermons or hear confessions. Solanus humbly and obediently accepted his restrictions.

Appointed to a New York friary, Solanus served primarily as “porter,” or receptionist and doorkeeper.

http://wau.org/images/sized/images/issues/FrSolanusCasey-400x415.jpg
I give my soul to Jesus Christ.


#5

[quote="martininthefiel, post:3, topic:271892"]
If there is an order of ineptitude, I should be Father Superior.:D

[/quote]

:rotfl:


#6

[quote="martininthefiel, post:3, topic:271892"]
If there is an order of ineptitude, I should be Father Superior.:D

Some of the greatest Saints were not extremely talented people in the secular realm. Offer-up to God the talents you do have. Humility is a great virtue.

[/quote]

I can be Mother Superior. :nun2::nun1:

I like this snippet (I've read a couple of places and am not sure where it originates.)

*Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
It's how the light gets in. *

I might add that the cracks are how the light gets out, also.


#7

[quote="anodos, post:1, topic:271892"]
If I were discerning a vocation to the religious life (I don't know yet), how could I serve? I have not been to college, my social skills aren't exemplary, I doubt that I would make a good teacher, and I have no desire for marriage (I have heard that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children, but are willing to give these up). I love the Church and would like to devote myself to Her, in whatever state of life that might be. Is there a place for someone like me?

[/quote]

There are orders that work with the elderly, the poor, missionary work etc. Teaching is not the only charism option. See if you are attracted to any of those charisms. If you are more attracted to a life of prayer, then look into contemplative orders. If God is calling you, there is a place for you!

Remember that wherever God calls us to be, whatever our failures and our imperfections God will fill those gaps if we let Him. Religious life, whatever form it takes, is not for the already holy. It is a path to holiness.

And you don't 'have' to have a desire for marriage. Some do, some do not. Most I would say so because it is very natural for women.


#8

[quote="Faustina123, post:6, topic:271892"]
I can be Mother Superior. :nun2::nun1:

I like this snippet (I've read a couple of places and am not sure where it originates.)

*Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
It's how the light gets in. *

I might add that the cracks are how the light gets out, also.

[/quote]

It's the chorus to Leonard Cohen's Anthem.
youtube.com/watch?v=_e39UmEnqY8


#9

[quote="anodos, post:1, topic:271892"]
If I were discerning a vocation to the religious life (I don't know yet), how could I serve? I have not been to college, my social skills aren't exemplary, I doubt that I would make a good teacher, and I have no desire for marriage (I have heard that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children, but are willing to give these up). I love the Church and would like to devote myself to Her, in whatever state of life that might be. Is there a place for someone like me?

[/quote]

I don't think it's accurate that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children. In Raymond Arroyo's biography on Mother Angelica, he writes that Mother Angelica said she never had a date or wanted one. Mother Angelica is a beautiful example of a nun who is following her vocation as she should.


#10

[quote="Splagchnizomai, post:4, topic:271892"]
Check out Venerable Solanus Casey, the porter of St Bonaventure! Note that a porter was part of the minor orders, which we no longer have. Nowadays, we have greeters and ushers, who are not ordained.

If we are open to God's will, we will never be inept.

Again he struggled academically, and his superiors had doubts about his calling. However, because his moral qualities were so outstanding, he was ordained on July 24, 1904. But there were limitations: He could not preach formal sermons or hear confessions. Solanus humbly and obediently accepted his restrictions.

Appointed to a New York friary, Solanus served primarily as “porter,” or receptionist and doorkeeper.

http://wau.org/images/sized/images/issues/FrSolanusCasey-400x415.jpg
I give my soul to Jesus Christ.

[/quote]

I live near Detroit. He is still greatly loved here.


#11

Saint Brother Andre is a very similar person:

saint-joseph.org/en_1078_index.php


#12

[quote="triumphguy, post:11, topic:271892"]
Saint Brother Andre is a very similar person:

saint-joseph.org/en_1078_index.php

[/quote]

I couldn't recall him when I wrote my post! Thank you!


#13

[quote="martininthefiel, post:10, topic:271892"]
I live near Detroit. He is still greatly loved here.

[/quote]

Wonderful to hear that. I've never been to Detroit, but if I ever go ... :)


#14

Despite what you may have heard, it is still part of God's Kingdom.:wink:


#15

[quote="martininthefiel, post:14, topic:271892"]
Despite what you may have heard, it is still part of God's Kingdom.:wink:

[/quote]

:D


#16

[quote="anodos, post:1, topic:271892"]
If I were discerning a vocation to the religious life (I don't know yet), how could I serve? I have not been to college, my social skills aren't exemplary, I doubt that I would make a good teacher, and I have no desire for marriage (I have heard that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children, but are willing to give these up). I love the Church and would like to devote myself to Her, in whatever state of life that might be. Is there a place for someone like me?

[/quote]

Mother Angelica never wanted to get married. The thought never occurred to her. And look at her today, known as one of the most famous and holy Nuns alive. If you feel this calling, than don't be discouraged.

Going to college is not a requirement for most Communities, especially cloistered ones. If you want to join a cloistered Community, I would recommend Our Lady of Angels Monastery in Hanceville, Alabama. If you're going to join a cloister, why not the one Mother Angelica herself lives in?

If you don't want to join a cloistered Community, I would recommend the Franciscan Sisters Minor in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal. They are both very great Communities. The Sisters of the Renewal are a very active Order, as far as I know, while the Sisters Minor are not. They are not cloistered, but they do spend most of their time in their Convent. However, sometimes they go out and do activities.


#17

[quote="Splagchnizomai, post:4, topic:271892"]
Check out Venerable Solanus Casey, the porter of St Bonaventure! Note that a porter was part of the minor orders, which we no longer have. Nowadays, we have greeters and ushers, who are not ordained.
http://wau.org/images/sized/images/issues/FrSolanusCasey-400x415.jpg
I give my soul to Jesus Christ.

[/quote]

What a beautiful picture! :)


#18

[quote="anodos, post:1, topic:271892"]
If I were discerning a vocation to the religious life (I don't know yet), how could I serve? I have not been to college, my social skills aren't exemplary, I doubt that I would make a good teacher, and I have no desire for marriage (I have heard that "healthy" nuns tend to have a longing for marriage and children, but are willing to give these up). I love the Church and would like to devote myself to Her, in whatever state of life that might be. Is there a place for someone like me?

[/quote]

I doubt that you're inept. Rather, you've just not yet found your niche. Many orders will accept work experience in place of a college degree. And there are contemplative and active orders that run retreat houses, and other corporate apostolates that do not necessarily require a degree (others may require a certificate of some kind, but would be willing put their members through certificate programs -though may wait until after you were in simple or solemn vows).

Pray for your vocation, now and always, even after you're in vows. A vocation is a very precious thing. It is why we should keep Religious in our prayers.

-RoderickA


#19

Anodos,I will tell you very sincerely,that the people I remember dearly as God´s loving examples,have not probably been the wisest,but the ones who had a kind word and a warm smile at the right time.Jesus,I trust in you....and focus on what HE can do,not on what you can do....God bless you!


#20

This question is one I've posed to myself for SO many years, specifically since 1995 when I realized that I had always had that calling, but never felt "good enough". I was going through the annulment process & thought I was too late. The deacon who served as my advocate convinced me of otherwise. I had no college degree, my marriage was miscarriage of what should have been a beautiful sacrament. I had a developmentally handicapped daughter who was a teen. I realized I would be her care giver for a long time. To top it all off, I fulfilled a personal dream, I adopted a special needs daughter (I do love to parent) as a single mother, because I practice celibacy.

First, I discovered secular institutes. Then, I discovered a group that did live secular consecration connected to the Good Shepherd Congregation. Ultimately, that wasn't for me, as they were much less conservative than I. All of my attempts to answer His Call ranged from not feasible to disastrous.

Finally, I decided that I couldn't be alone & started my own charism that I now share with six others, The Oblate Sisters of Mary Magdalene. We have one young man in Canada who is living our charism as a hermit, under the male gender's name of Hermits of St. Andre. We are modeling our way of life after that of secular institutes, with much of our guidelines coming from the Sheonstatt Sisters of Mary. We have a habit for occasions of community, with a veil for women & cassock for men. In the world we have a common dress that is very discreet & an horarium that is made to blend into the day of regular working people & all who must operate outside of community. We have provisions for women who are unable to make the vows of the evangelical counsels & for married women who wish to be associates. We refer to them as Intercessors of St. Mary Magdalene.. This is the Cliff Notes version. Anyone interested can contact me here on Catholic Answers.

Even if our way of life is not for you, I pray that you get a book of the various communities, congregations & secular institutes. We are a private association of the faithful. We are not operating canonically with my bishop, but his office is aware of us and all we do. They are waiting to see the fruits of our mission. I feel confident that those fruits will be many. Actually, the Chancellor with whom I am in contact is sold on our charism. I have great hopes for all of us "misfits". I know there is an answer somewhere for you & all who are in your state in life. Pray for us. Pray for your vocation. Pray for all vocations that are holy, sacramental & in communion with Rome.

I will pray for your (and all who identify with you) success. Ask Our Lady to be your spiritual guide. She will never fail you. :thumbsup:


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