Is this a valid novena?


#1

Someone sent me this novena, but it sounds more like a chain letter :shrug: a friend told me that ‘chain prayers’ are disapproved by the Church.

I don’t know why it mentions Mother Teresa or what the association is…

does anyone know??

thanks :slight_smile:

here it is:

"PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY WITH FULL INTENTIONS, UNDERSTAND, AND CIRCULATE>
TO AS MANY…

Mother Teresa Prediction 2009

You were chosen to receive this novena. The moment you receive it, say:

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name,Thy kingdom come, Thy
will be done, on earth as it is in heaven, give us this day our daily
bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass
against us and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.
Amen.

"Father, please protect and bless the person reading this message… "
GOD WANTED ME TO TELL YOU, It shall be well with you this coming year. No
matter how much your enemies try this year, they will not succeed. You
have been destined to make it and you shall surely achieve all your goals
this year For the remainder of 2009, all your agonies will be diverted
and victory and prosperity will be in coming in abundance. Today God has
confirmed the end of your sufferings, sorrows and pain because HE that
sits on the throne has remembered you… He has taken away the hardships
and given you
JOY. He will never let you down.

This is a Novena from Mother Theresa that started in 1952. It has never
been broken. Within 48 hours send 20copies (Or as many as you can - God
does know if you don’t have 20 people to send it to. It’s the effort and
intent that counts.) to family and friends. This is a powerful Novena.

Couldn’t hurt. Can only help. Please do not break it…

Rev. John Sgarlata"

So…if it’s not valid, disregard it… if it is, Im sharing it with you :wink: lol! :stuck_out_tongue:


#2

Pure spam. Do everyone a favor and let it die with you.

I like how it was started in 1952, but refers to the year 2009. :rolleyes:

Betsy


#3

that is what I thought too!


#4

Oh Lord! :rolleyes:I agree.Toss it.


#5

I was sent this Novena with a picture of two angels one of the angels has her wings spread and is standing holding a sword over the other angel kneeling in prayer with her wings folded in......they are amongst clouds as though in Heaven.
I went to Google and looked up the Novena Saint Teresa started in 1952 and it is a fact that it has been broken.
My question is what is with the 2 angels especially the one holding a sword and looking like she is going to use it on the other angel? Can anyone answer this question or has anyone else received this Novena with this very disturbing picture of two angels. My email is [email]johnpaul1818@yahoo.com[/email] hope to get some kind of reply or closure on this. Please help!!!!!!!


#6

The one with the two angels is spam, too. And clicking on an e-mail link in a discussion board is pretty disingenuous, it sounds like another way to propagate spam.

A history lesson is in order here: Way back when wooly mammoths roamed the earth, the internet wasn't invented, and mail referred to what you received via the Post Office, chain letters, some of them with a religious bent, were very common. Of course, to continue the chain, you had to hand write or typewrite the letter (this was even before commonly available copying machines--horrors!,) put the letters in envelopes, stamp them, address them, and mail them.

These letters frequently had prayers or "novenas" attached to them. Occasionally, you were supposed to send money to the person who sent the letter to you, with the idea that the ten people who you sent the chain letter to would send money to you (thus multiplying your initial outlay by ten times.)

A couple of very official bodies took a very jaundiced view of these chain letters: 1. The US Post Office, and 2. The Roman Catholic Church.

The Post Office considered the fraudulent use of their services to obtain money mail fraud (which was a federal crime.) The Catholic Church considered reliance on the "luck" these letters were supposed to bring a mortal sin--superstition.

Chain letters were ubiquitous in the late fifties and through the 1960's. Most recipients threw them out.

They resurfaced in a new form in the 1990's---the chain e-mail. The Post Office didn't give a hoot about this. But I'm sure the Catholic Church still considers them sinful if you pass them on under fraudulent pretenses, or are superstitious enough to believe in them. And I think that would apply to spreading a virus by one as well (destruction of someone else's property.)

Save yourself the trip to the confessional: Hit the delete button.


#7

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.