Is this considered stealing or not? What do you think?

I watched a preview of a new show that aired on TLC called Extreme Couponing. Overall it shows people who use coupons to the extreme. For example, I saw on how a woman went to buy a LOT of groceries that would have cost around 2,000 dollars. But she only had to pay around 100 something dollars.

Doesn't this seem wrong? I understand that people can use coupons when they need to save money, especially during touch times. But this is just ridiculous.

Here is a link: youtube.com/watch?v=FORB0P3hSiI&feature=channel_video_title

And another: youtube.com/watch?v=5_9FR-9do-w&feature=channel_video_title

One more: youtube.com/watch?v=P-BsjPjm2bo&feature=channel_video_title

These are all previews on this show! So tell me what you all think?

As for me, I do think that coupons can help when times are tough but this just seems so wrong. In a way, I feel that they are stealing from the stores. It costs money to make this products after all. Just my thoughts!

If the coupon is valid, then the company is giving you permission to purchase the item at that price. That's not stealing, it's like a gift for being their customer.;)

Can it get you good deals? Yes.:D

Is the company going to have a profit at the end of the day? Maybe not, but companies tend to think these things through before distributing coupons.

As the previous poster said, if they didn't want you to use their coupons, they wouldn't distribute them. Sure, some folks make coupon-clipping almost an obsession, but there are plenty of others who never use coupons. For every coupon that winds up in the hands of these coupon-gurus, there are probably a dozen that wind up in the recycle bin having never being used. It all evens out, and I see no sin here. :)

[quote="Art321, post:1, topic:235242"]
In a way, I feel that they are stealing from the stores. It costs money to make this products after all. Just my thoughts!

[/quote]

Nope, not stealing.

The coupons come from 2 sources - the stores and the manufacturers. The stores offer the coupons to get the customers in the door, and the manufacturers offer the coupons to get customers to try their products. The manufacturers pay the stores for the coupons, so the stores get the money.

If they did not want people taking advantage of the coupons, they would not put them out there.

I don't avidly coupon anymore due to time, but when I was home with my kids when they were small, I would often combine store coupons with manufacture coupons and save $10-$15 a week.

A coupon is a reason to try a new product. The number of coupons used are recorded for that particular item. Manufacturers know that money is tight for a lot of people, so they offer coupons hoping you'll try their juice or ice cream, for example. Manufacturers also know that people are hesitant, in some cases, to try something new, so a coupon helps a person to "decide" to try something. It doesn't always work but it obviously works often enough to help sell whatever the manufacturer makes.

You have permission to use a coupon, either from a store or a manufacturer. People like saving money.

Peace,
Ed

[quote="Art321, post:1, topic:235242"]
I watched a preview of a new show that aired on TLC called Extreme Couponing. Overall it shows people who use coupons to the extreme. For example, I saw on how a woman went to buy a LOT of groceries that would have cost around 2,000 dollars. But she only had to pay around 100 something dollars.

Doesn't this seem wrong? I understand that people can use coupons when they need to save money, especially during touch times. But this is just ridiculous.

Here is a link: youtube.com/watch?v=FORB0P3hSiI&feature=channel_video_title

And another: youtube.com/watch?v=5_9FR-9do-w&feature=channel_video_title

One more: youtube.com/watch?v=P-BsjPjm2bo&feature=channel_video_title

These are all previews on this show! So tell me what you all think?

As for me, I do think that coupons can help when times are tough but this just seems so wrong. In a way, I feel that they are stealing from the stores. It costs money to make this products after all. Just my thoughts!

[/quote]

This is not stealing because the manufacturers pay almost all the money back to the store and the they choose to make those copouns.

It's not stealing but unless someone is actually using that kind of quantity of product, it seems a little strange to me. And I also get a little concerned when I see an "extreme couponer" loading up on a product with their stock of coupons so that the sale price item is depleted from the store inventory, meaning the little old lady with ONE coupon who wanted just one of the item gets left out.

[quote="Art321, post:1, topic:235242"]

As for me, I do think that coupons can help when times are tough but this just seems so wrong. In a way, I feel that they are stealing from the stores. It costs money to make this products after all. Just my thoughts!

[/quote]

As everyone else has stated definitely not stealing... but I'm curious as to why you think it is.

When a store or manufacturer produces coupons they are agreeing to "eat" whatever that cost is. I'm just jealous that I would never have the time to sit and sift through all those coupons to save that much money.

[quote="Art321, post:1, topic:235242"]
I watched a preview of a new show that aired on TLC called Extreme Couponing. Overall it shows people who use coupons to the extreme. For example, I saw on how a woman went to buy a LOT of groceries that would have cost around 2,000 dollars. But she only had to pay around 100 something dollars.

Doesn't this seem wrong? I !

[/quote]

I didn't see the show but used to coupon and follow those clubs (pre-internet era) when it made sense (doesn't now). If she and the stores are adhering to the rules of those who issued the coupons, no there is no moral issue. In some places stores have put rules in place against double couponing and other practices, but if the store accepts the coupon they are the ones who have to deal with the manufacturers and show they purchased enough product to be covered by coupons, or comply with all other rules of the offer.

It is only in very competetive grocery markets that this practice becomes as beneficial. Ours is not, except a couple of private very localized chains the only competition are HEB and a few, not all, Walmarts. HEB has their own instore coupon deals aimed at families, and many piggy back on manufacturer offers, but the "extreme" couponing probably won't work here because of store policies.

there also used to be a lot more "premiums" gifts you got at point of sale or by sending in proof of purchase, that bolstered net gain from couponing, that is rarer now.

bottom line it is not stealing to use coupons as intended according the rules, the store and the manufacture consider it a cost of doing business and advertising.

my favorite coupon success was at Kmart, they had a special at Thanksgiving, buy a turkey, get a free ham. Both my brother and I had a coupon so we each bought 10 turkeys (the limit) and after consultation with the manager, also the 20 free hams, for a neighborhood food bank that had recently been robbed of all its holiday stores. We actually got on the evening news who happened to be there when we dropped off the meat. cool.

This TLC show gets a big thumbs down from me... it's exploitative of the people being featured (makes them look like crazy hoarders) and it is freaking out the manufacturers and stores which means that normal couponers are soon going to go through a deal-dry-spell... I am a couponer and take advantage of a spectacular deal, but I try hard to follow the rules and buy what my family will use, donating any extras!

Think of coupons as another form of currency issued by the manufacturer. Your using this currency doesn't shortchange the store at all... read the fine print on a coupon... the store receives the face value of the coupon from the manufacturer plus a substantial amount in handling. Whether a manufacturer issues coupons, or a store chooses to put out its own promotion and double/triple -- that's their choice, they reserve the right to pull promotions at any time, and any losses that result (from customers participating by the rules, of course) are their responsibility. One thing that bothers me is that when promos suddenly get pulled due to losses, the company often screams "coupon fraud" as the reason when overuse is clearly the company's fault for not thinking things through when issuing the coupon (putting up a coupon online with no print limits, for example).

If you build up a good rapport with your store, it's not difficult to place special orders for cases of product instead of clearing shelves. Win-win for everyone. Of course that isn't extreme enough for TLC. :mad:

I tried starting a thread on coupon ethics when I was more of a coupon newbie. I still run into grey areas once in a while.
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=436596

It's not stealing, it's just a marketing campaign. However, it could fall under the sin of greed if you take more than you can use within a reasonable time (such as by the time the product expires).

It's also uncharitable since it prevents others from saving money as well.

[quote="Melancholic, post:10, topic:235242"]
This TLC show gets a big thumbs down from me... it's exploitative of the people being featured (makes them look like crazy hoarders) and it is freaking out the manufacturers and stores which means that normal couponers are soon going to go through a deal-dry-spell... I am a couponer and take advantage of a spectacular deal, but I try hard to follow the rules and buy what my family will use, donating any extras!

Think of coupons as another form of currency issued by the manufacturer. Your using this currency doesn't shortchange the store at all... read the fine print on a coupon... the store receives the face value of the coupon from the manufacturer plus a substantial amount in handling. Whether a manufacturer issues coupons, or a store chooses to put out its own promotion and double/triple -- that's their choice, they reserve the right to pull promotions at any time, and any losses that result (from customers participating by the rules, of course) are their responsibility. One thing that bothers me is that when promos suddenly get pulled due to losses, the company often screams "coupon fraud" as the reason when overuse is clearly the company's fault for not thinking things through when issuing the coupon (putting up a coupon online with no print limits, for example).

If you build up a good rapport with your store, it's not difficult to place special orders for cases of product instead of clearing shelves. Win-win for everyone. Of course that isn't extreme enough for TLC. :mad:

I tried starting a thread on coupon ethics when I was more of a coupon newbie. I still run into grey areas once in a while.
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=436596

[/quote]

Thank you for your thoughts! It really helped and thank you for everyone for replying. It really helped put things into perspective. I guess I just felt that these people were taking it too far and abusing the system.

Anyway, thank you everyone.

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