Is using software with an expired license a sin?


#1

At my previous workplace, They provided all employees with with Office 365 subscriptions. I changed jobs last January, but the programs still worked on my computer. I am now getting a message the license is invalid, however the program still works. Would continuing to use the software be a sin?

I am thinking it would be. Correct?


#2

I don’t think it would be sinful but I could be misunderstanding the situation.

Also, https://www.computerworld.com/article/3207547/office-software/what-happens-when-an-office-365-subscription-expires.html


#3

Is it a sin to take and use something that belongs to someone else when they haven’t given you permission to use it or explicitly revoked previously granted permission to use it? If yes, then using software with an expired license is a sin. If no, then there is no sin. I’m pretty sure that it counts as a sin.

Besides, unless some critical work needs to be done, you can just use Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online. Both are free, and at least Google Docs is suitable for most people’s needs. Office Online might be as well now, but it was pretty bare-bones last I used it.


#4

Thanks, the issue is that I have built vast spreadsheets in the excel platform with lots of hidden code running in the back round, so it would be hard to transition to another platform.


#5

I believe Office Online has support for macros. Google Sheets has an equivalent, but the language is different, though there are tools for helping conversion like GSpread(dot)NET.


#6

The invalid license probably means that you can’t get tech support for it


#7

It depends on the specifics of the license agreement; as previously mentioned, some say that expiration equals a revocation of permission while for others an expiration is simply a discontinuation of support and updates.


#8

Against some corporate policies you probably never agreed to in the first place? Yes. Sinful? I don’t know.


#9

It might be better anyway to upgrade the software with a newer version.

I move WORD and EXCEL files between a laptop that has a annual license and a desktop that has a permanent one; they work compatibly, but I am not using advanced features.


#10

If it bothers you, buy a license. Eighty bucks for a one year license on Amazon


#11

I don’t think it is a sin. If the software works then how is using it a sin? Apparently the software company has a grace period in which you can use it without a valid license.


#12

If u know it is expired and you use it without paying for it then it is steeling.


#13

It is your employer’s business. You should mention it to the IT department; they might have paid but not have updated yet.


#14

One factor that may not have been addressed yet: If your previous employer had a site license, then (from what I have seen of Microsoft site licenses) you no longer have a valid license. Besides the fact that it expired on the calendar, it probably expired when you left the company.

Be that as it may, to be sure of the legality (and consequentially the morality), you would have to read and figure out the license agreement.


#15

See if your new employer has a site license or will procure a new license for you.


#16

Based on the link here, it looks ad though you will have a 30 day grace period to back up any important files.

The company terminated your company issued license, so you should expect the software to have “limited functioning” (read and print, but not editing functionality) within the next 30 days.

Based on the particulars shared here, it would not be a sin to use the software during the grace period, particularly to help transition to a new platform (your own license to Office or an alternative as mentioned above).


closed #17

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