Is your pastor, minister, rabbi rich?

I’m wondering how much money leaders of different faiths earn.

How much money do priests get for personal expenses?

What about in your church or temple. How much money are the leaders paid?

Catholic priests aren’t paid, since their vocation isn’t a job. They rely on Christians for food, shelter, vestments, etc. The money they receive is almsgiving; no Christian is obligated to pay a priest for any service, even if a priest demands to be paid.

Some priests, however, do steal money from their parishes, or demand to be paid for every service. They get very rich and very sinful this way.

My Pastor makes about 45,000 a year, works 45 or more hours a week, is on call 24/7, has a wife and six kids with one on the way, owns a house and a old car. I think that he is rich because God has given him more than just worldly things.

Well-said.

I was going to say that if our parish priest is rich, it isn’t in monetary terms.

Why would we be privy to that number? I think it might even be unethical to pry.

I think the information is available. Doesn’t each parish keep of record of what they do with the money they take in?

Some televangelists get filthy rich. Some Protestant ministers make a working-class living (or maybe a little better). I think that priests and nuns live on very little, though. I know that they get a little bit of money for presonal expenses, like cards or small gifts for friends and such. But I wonder how much that amounts to.

I have no idea what rabbis make.

I just found this.

Study: Catholic priests’ salaries low, but financial security better

by:

DALLAS – Catholic priests rank near the bottom of the pay scale for Christian clergy compensation, but the Catholic Church offers the best model for “financial quality of life,” according to a new Duke University study.
The study says the church’s provision for job security, benefits and allowances for priests makes the Catholic Church one of the more socially just, according to the Catholic News Service.
“The Catholic Church is very resistant to the forces of the free market,” said the study’s co-author, Becky McMillan, a Methodist minister. "Priests are cared for. Congregations get pastoral leadership regardless of income. It’s more in line with the economic justice and equity norms that are expressed in the mission of the Gospel."
In 2002, the National Association of Church Business Administration (NACBA) and the National Federation of Priests’ Councils did their own surveys. Both show Catholic pastors receive far below the average base salary of Protestant senior pastors, according to the report.
The NACBA found the average pastor in the Catholic Church has a total taxable income of $31,465. That’s less than half the compensation of a Lutheran senior pastor with an average income of $76,247. An Episcopalian senior pastor receives the largest average salary at $110,192.
McMillan said those numbers are deceiving. There is a significant difference between base salary and “a better financial quality of life,” she said.
Catholic priests usually have their room, board and pension covered by their parish, have their seminary training costs covered by the diocese and are compensated for continuing education. And priests have no family for which to provide, she said.

Diocesan priest has salary and they also need to file income tax like the rest of us though they make around $20,000 a year.

The religious priests gives all they have to the community. Some of these priests or even religious brothers have salary from the job they have such as teaching, etc … but their paycheck goes to their religious community.

Don’t priests also tithe as well?

I wouldn’t say I am “rich”…I make a modest salary as a commercial lighting specialist. I work with architects and engineers on commercial buildings. I live in a small house and I drive a *98 Subaru Forrester. I don’t make enough to go to Hawaii on vacation…but I can afford a weekend at the coast.

My Great High Priest however…well, that’s another story.:slight_smile:

'Fraid Withwind is correct, Eucharisted. Clergy, whether they are Catholic or non-Catholic, are considered employees for federal tax purposes, and self-employed for social-security purposes (unless one has opted out of social security, which order priests and some non-Catholic clergy do as conscientious objectors). And if a parsonage/rectory is given, it’s fair-rental value is taxed at the self-employment rate (15.3%). If a housing allowance is given in lieu of a parsonage, it is NOT taxed.

Most folks have no idea that clergy are taxed at all.

The 2009 DAC (denominational average compensation) in the United Methodist Church is $58,226.

'Fraid Withwind is correct, Eucharisted. Clergy, whether they are Catholic or non-Catholic, are considered employees for federal tax purposes, and self-employed for social-security purposes (unless one has opted out of social security, which order priests and some non-Catholic clergy do as conscientious objectors). And if a parsonage/rectory is given, it’s fair-rental value is taxed at the self-employment rate (15.3%). If a housing allowance is given in lieu of a parsonage, it is NOT taxed.

I thought that clergy were considered self-employed for income tax as well. Did the law change?

Most folks have no idea that clergy are taxed at all.

I’ve met PhD’s who were under the impression that clergy did not pay income tax.

The law changed a few years ago - no more 1099’s. Unless you are a traveling evangelist and work as an independent contractor, you get a W-2. The law reads, “For income tax purposes, a licensed, commissioned, or ordained minister is generally treated as a common law employee of his or her church, denomination, or sect… If you are a minister performing ministerial services, you are [also] taxed on wages, offerings, and fees you receive for performing marriages, baptismals, and/or funerals.” If you are a member of a religious order, you are exempt from self-employment tax.

Schedule C deductions for clergy are now, as a rule, disallowed - which is why churches have started paying professional fees, mileage, cell phones, etc. by accountable reimbursement - which is not taxable.

The IRS is not beyond auditing clergy either - and making examples of them. Two ministerial friends of mine, one a Catholic priest, nearly didn’t recover from audits that disallowed all of their Schedule C deductions going back several years. It was awful.

Be sure you support your priest or pastors in helping them situate their remuneration legally and with all the tax advantages you can legally use. It could save them thousands of dollars in taxes and income that they can keep in their pocket or bank - and prevent them from garnished wages in the future.

O+

The local councils of our churches publish such financial information yearly. It is posted and available if anyone wants a copy.

My pastor once worked under Jim Bakker of the PTL club infamy. Since that time he returned to Foursquare and has been assigned to small churches. Most of his income has come from his police pension, teaching and contracting work. The church has only been able to offer a parsonage as most of the compensation. Since we are in a small church who is watching the surronding community turn from what is was to one were wealthy Chinese are buying out the next generation membership. As the children raised in our church can not come close to the multi-million dollar buy in to the local real estate market. As it stands we have the elders hanging on and many African immigrants who commute to fellowship with us. As the local Chinese Christians mostly attend Chinese congregations in Mandarin

The Catholic church relies on their weekly offerings to take care of their churches if need repairs and such. My question is to non-Catholics is this. If the church relies on their weekly offerings to fix it and such, non-Catholics have many worships in Assembly Halls etc…where does that money go to? Do they fix up their Assembly Halls? Or do the pastors pocket it like Osteen and the like. We have a Middle School here that holds worship, but 'm wondering where that money goes to? Imagine a “church” at a Middle school…:shrug:

When I see this type of thread I get the impression that it is believed that the Bishop Long’s, the Benny Hinn’s are the rules and the the exceptions to the rule.
Most will have some sort of body of church elders who determine where the money goes while the senior pastor or an administrative pastor does the day to day spending. Sort of like congress and the president. The money goes to many places besides the building upkeep and pastor’s salary. In some denominations the church tithe their intake to their denomination. Missions, ministries, musicians and on and on must be paid for and thus the money is allocated. Some churches will make a beautiful museum out of their building others will send all of their money out in missionary support.

In unprogrammed Friend’s Meetings, each Friend supports the Meeting. There is no weekly offering…there is no plate passed. Typically we have a Presiding Clerk and a Recording Clerk who’s task is to “oversee” the Meeting. Clerks may serve for years…or be nominated yearly…the “Elders” serve for a term and help run the Meeting, there’s not a paid clergy since each Friend is “minister” to the Meeting and “priest” for him or her self as we share in the “priesthood of all believers”.

The “offerings” that each Friend contributes is volutary. It takes care of the mortgage, rent or upkeep of the Meeting House and other expenses the Meeting may have.

=OneTrueCathApos;5196834]
The Catholic church relies on their weekly offerings to take care of their churches if need repairs and such. My question is to non-Catholics is this. If the church relies on their weekly offerings to fix it and such, non-Catholics have many worships in Assembly Halls etc…where does that money go to? Do they fix up their Assembly Halls?

I would say the vast majority don’t meet or worship in “assembly halls”. Most have a sanctuary. And yes, offerings in a non-catholic church usually go toward the same things as Catholic parishes.

Or do the pastors pocket it like Osteen and the like.

So, how much does Osteen pocket? If you don’t know, then this comment is at best speculative, at worst gossip.

We have a Middle School here that holds worship, but 'm wondering where that money goes to? Imagine a “church” at a Middle school…:shrug:

Imagine a church in a middle school? Christ might have when He delcared “where two or more are gathered in my name, there I shall be also”.

While appearances may be deceiving, particularly on a forum, your post here appears so judgemental, and even self-righteous. I’m sure I am wrong. :blush:

Jon

In the 5 years I have been at my home church we have rented space to 2 different churches. One broke up and its members fellowship with others. The second outgrew our space and is renting hotel conference rooms because they can not afford to build in our community. At present time the underling land on a normal sized home is over a million dollars US.

What is wrong with a school, a place dedicated to educating our young? We are no longer in a world were a king will donate some of the land his army has captured to build a church. Planting a church can be impossible on an economic level.

If you think Middle Schools are shocking one of our larger ministries is supporting the Racetrack Chaplancies. We are putting Chapels on the infields of horse racing tracks to minister to those taking care of the gambling industry’s horses. Were is a church more needed, at a horsetrack or Vatican City?

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.