Israeli police and Palestinians clash on Temple Mount


#1

The unrest came as the Israeli parliament prepared to debate a motion calling on Israel to “realise its sovereignty over the Temple Mount”.

Moshe Feiglin, a right-wing member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party who tabled the motion, wants restrictions on Jewish visitors to be lifted. They are currently barred from praying or engaging in other religious activities there.

Although no vote was expected, the the Islamic Waqf - the trust that has overseen the site since Israel captured East Jerusalem from Jordan in the 1967 Middle East war - expressed concern and said there had been “Jordanian contacts with Israel to prevent any moves” affecting its status.

bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-26338344

The Dome of the Rock Mosque in Jerusalem; this is the Rock that, according to Jewish tradition, is where Abraham was commanded by God to sacrifice his son Isaac:

According to the Talmud, it was close to here, on the site of the altar, that God gathered the earth that was formed into Adam. It was on this rock that Adam—and later Cain, Abel, and Noah—offered sacrifices to God. Jewish sources identify this rock as the place mentioned in the Bible where Abraham fulfilled God’s test to see if he would be willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. The mountain is identified as Moriah in Genesis 22. It is also identified as the rock upon which Jacob dreamt about angels ascending and descending on a ladder and consequently consecrating and offering a sacrifice upon . . .

The Noble Sanctuary, where the Foundation Stone is located, is thought by commentators of the Qur’an to be the place to which the prophet Muhammad traveled in the Night Journey.[citation needed] Although the Koran does not specifically mention Jerusalem in name as the ascension site, labelling the site vaguely as the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the Hadith, the recorded sayings of Mohammad, specify that the site is indeed the Foundation Stone in Jerusalem.[26] According to Islamic belief, angels visited the site 2,000 years before the creation of Adam. It is also thought to be the place where Israfel, the angel of the trumpet, will sound his horn on Resurrection Day.

Beneath the Foundation Stone is a cavern known as the Well of Souls. It is sometimes thought of as the traditional hiding place of the Ark of the Covenant. For this reason, the Dome of the Rock was built over it,[citation needed] and it is the original place Muslims faced while praying[citation needed] (they now face towards Mecca).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foundation_Stone


#2

It is probably time to no longer acquiesce to continuing Islamic bigotry against Jews as a legitimate reason from keeping Jews from visiting their own sacred sites.

Threats of violence are nothing new from the Palestinians. The less that people stand up to bullies, the more that it encourages people to engage in bullying behavior in the first place.


#3

The problem is that the site is sacred for both Jews and Muslims.

Also, the fear is that some Jewish extremists (and their Evangelical backers) will vandalize the al-Aqsa Mosque, or even try to demolish it altogether to rebuild the Temple of Jerusalem.


#4

The site is also sacred to many Christians. :slight_smile: :slight_smile:


#5

Since Jews have an interest in this as a sacred site, it is time to allow Jews access.

It is possible that allowing Jews access to the site will result in vandalism and destruction, just as allowing access to NYC to Muslims led to the World Trade Centre being destroyed.
Either way, it is not a legitimate argument to make denying access to places just because extremists have bad intent.

Welcome to the real world.


#6

Denying access to places just because extremists have bad intent cuts both ways in Israeli society:

news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/spl/hi/pop_ups/07/in_pictures_the_barrier_by_kai_wiedenhofer/html/8.stm

Health and medical services

Médecins du Monde, the Palestinian Red Crescent Society and Physicians for Human Rights-Israel have stated that the barrier “harms West Bank health”.[84] Upon completion of the construction, the organizations predict, the barrier would prevent over 130,000 Palestinian children from being immunised, and deny more than 100,000 pregnant women (out of which 17,640 are high risk pregnancies) access to healthcare in Israel. In addition, almost a third of West Bank villages will suffer from lack of access to healthcare. After completion, many residents may lose complete access to emergency care at night. In towns near Jerusalem (Abu Dis and al-Eizariya), for example, average time for an ambulance to travel to the nearest hospital has increased from 10 minutes to over 110 minutes.[85] A report from Physicians for Human Rights-Israel states that the barrier imposes “almost-total separation” on the hospitals from the population they are supposed to serve.[86] The report also said that patients from the West Bank visiting Jerusalem’s Palestinian clinics declined by half from 2002 to 2003.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israeli_West_Bank_barrier#Reduced_freedoms


#7

Communities would not be severed if they did not exist on both sides of the barrier in the first place.
Ambulances that carried terrorists and their bombs into Jewish communities can no longer do so with impunity.

To the extent that people coexist in a perpetual state of war, of course people are going to suffer. It cannot be used as an excuse to perpetuate religious bigotry against Jews, nevertheless.


#8

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