Japan hangs two prisoners, including first convicted in lay judge trial


#1

First, if one wonders what “Lay Judge” means from the article:

The lay judge system was introduced to reflect citizens’ views in criminal court proceedings.

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Japan hangs two prisoners, including first convicted in lay judge trial**

KYODO

Japan hanged two death-row inmates Friday in the first executions carried out since June and the first under the order of Justice Minister Mitsuhide Iwaki, who took the role in October.

One was Sumitoshi Tsuda, 63, who was convicted in the murder of his landlord and two other people in Kawasaki in May 2009.

The second was Kazuyuki Wakabayashi, 39, who was convicted of killing two women in Iwate Prefecture in 2006. He abandoned the victims’ bodies on a mountain.

Tsuda was convicted in a lay judge trial. His execution marked the first-ever killing of a prisoner convicted in such a trial.

Tsuda was convicted of killing his landlord, Akihito Shibata, 73, Shibata’s brother Yoshiaki, 71, and Yoshiaki’s wife, Toshiko, 68, in May 2009 at an apartment building in Kawasaki, Kanagawa Prefecture.

Wakabayashi was sentenced to death for killing Noriko Ueno, a 52-year-old office worker, and her 24-year-old daughter Yuki, after breaking into their home in the town of Hirono, Iwate Prefecture, in July 2006.

Iwaki told a news conference that he believes professional and lay judges handed down a death sentence on Tsuda “after careful deliberations.”

The lay judge system was introduced to reflect citizens’ views in criminal court proceedings.

japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/12/18/national/crime-legal/japan-hangs-two-death-row-inmates-including-first-condemned-lay-judge-trial/#.VnOUAE-KZVJ

Amnesty International coverage: amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2015/12/japan-two-men-hanged-as-disgraceful-executions-continue/


#2

This raises the endless debate of the death penalty.

I don’t agree with the death penalty for one reason only - to quote my old pastor, “better that ten guilty men rot in jail than that one innocent person hang.”

Of itself it is not necessarily unjust. If someone killed you, in cold blood and showing not an ounce of remorse, why should he keep his own life?

It costs the Australian taxpayer $824 (Aust) per day to keep serial killer Ivan Milat alive in jail. That’s more than the cost of an overnight stay in Sydney’s priciest hotel, or 7 days work for an Australian on the minimum wage for a day’s accommodatin. Seven Australians on minimum wage are donating all their working life to keeping unrepentant serial murderer Mr. Milat safe in jail.

References -

Minimum wage rates - google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=minimum+wage+in+australia

Cost of Ivan Milat imprisonment - dailytelegraph.com.au/a-day-to-keep-milat-in-jail/story-e6freuy9-1111118728516

Personally I think Ivan Milat is a waste of space. I believe the authorities should just dig a hole in the ground and put a bullet in the back of his head at a cost of a couple of dollars, and then fill it in again.

And that’s despite the church teaching on disagreeing with the death penalty. How far should we go to protect these people?


#3

I too am against the death penalty because you cannot recover from your mistake.
I do support selling food to prisoners, who could work for it; grow it or beg from charities. This will ease significantly the cost of prisons to the public purse. I have also prepared a paper for some private prison providers in the States, outlining further cost savings they may not have considered. The Lady Di Memorial Mine field between the external fences will cut down on manning with only a roving dog patrol required. Cell usage is not best practice in the States. They must look to Thailand where 8 per cell is the norm. How do you bed them in an 8 by 6 cell? Bunks up the walls, with the electrification of the cell floor at 8pm to encourage use.
These ideas, along with placement of prisons in the center of Australia will cut costs, un-necessary visitors requiring drug protocols and manning. Indeed if you surround the prison with 10,000 sq miles of uninhabited desert you may not even need the cost of walls.Fly in fly out guards on a reasonable roster with air conditioned quarters will work, as temperatures reach 50 degrees centigrade in summer .
Thus innocent people would have time to prove their innocence as they would be imprisoned forever, or until they can no longer work or could no longer afford their medical costs whichever comes first. Then you can hang them with a good conscience, knowing that you gave them every opportunity.
It is good to see us Australians have the same outlook and vision.


#4

Japanese Lay Judges are like a US Jury, but with significantly more authority - they are chosen citizens that are within a panel with professional judges, and have the authority to decide law and sentence prisoners.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lay_judges_in_Japan


#5

I suppose this begs the question of whether it would be better for that one innocent person to hang than to “rot in jail,” no? It also assumes that death is the ultimate evil that can be done to any individual.

Is God not merciful and in more complete control than human beings think ourselves to be?


#6

So if they can’t afford food they starve to death? And you consider this ‘justice’?

These ideas, along with placement of prisons in the center of Australia will cut costs, un-necessary visitors requiring drug protocols and manning.

What do you consider ‘unnecessary’? Placement in the centre of the nation will basically mean no visitors at all. Are spousal visits ‘unnecessary’? Are visits with children ‘unnecessary’? You do really think that such conditions are going to facilitate a change of heart and mind?

It is good to see us Australians have the same outlook and vision.

This Australian considers your suggestions to be an absolutely moronic.


#7

What do you consider ‘unnecessary’? Placement in the centre of the nation will basically mean no visitors at all. Are spousal visits ‘unnecessary’? Are visits with children ‘unnecessary’? You do really think that such conditions are going to facilitate a change of heart and mind?

This Australian considers your suggestions to be an absolutely moronic.

I’m hoping he was been satirical and a bit tongue in cheek. Especially considering the late Princess Diana was extremely well known for her vocal opposition to the use of land mines.


#8

I’m hoping he was been satirical and a bit tongue in cheek. Especially considering the late Princess Diana was extremely well known for her vocal opposition to the use of land mines.

Now you got it. LOL. At least you suspected irony.The other post was wise to condemn my suggestions. I am surprised as an Aussie they did not suspect an evil sense of humour. Sometimes I can’t help myself. These pages get very serious and rather sad at times.


#9

Ah, well. Jokes on me. Totally missed it. It didn’t even occur to me.

I thought you were serious and insane.

Which now seems really dumb. :smiley:


#10

Don’t be too hard on yourself.

I suspect there are posters in here that will say the exact same things Petaro said in all seriousness.


#11

Oh indeed there are, I can imagine his suggestions been seen as too liberal in fact :smiley:


#12

Yes

Just when I start thinking I’ve read it all, another post surprises me and takes me aback.

I’ve read some real doozies. The bright side? Nobody can accuse us Catholics as of all thinking alike.


#13

I think you mean shouldn’t, cause they still can. :smiley:

I ususally hear that Christmas day and I wouldn’t mind a change this year so I wish it was can’t. Same time I hear that the Pope must be the anti-Christ because he is the only religious leader whose congregation follows his orders to a t. :rolleyes:


#14

I don’t know if anyone mentioned the mode of execution, depending on where one stands on the issue, hanging seems severe and is not done generally anywhere in the USA. Perhaps in Utah, one can choose between firing squad, lethal injection and perhaps hanging. Hanging appears inhumane to many as does about any form of execution but more so.


#15

Matthew 25; 35 should be our guidelines for treatment of prisoners. Prison is a hard place. I was Exec. Manager Human Resources for a private prison group for two years before I had to resign as a matter of conscience.We ran three prisons. When we start treating people as capital assets and cost items we lose our soul.
I find it easy to harden our hearts to people whom we judge to be evil. Many are, however, we must be open to their humanity as Jesus is to ours. As a lawyer, I have seen too many cases in English law where the ultimate mistake was made and an innocent life was taken in the hardening of hearts. Everyone involved could honestly say they did their best, but it is like passing the water of Pilate in polite conversation, whilst another person dies.
We don’t have the death penalty in Australia for this very reason and those who are quick to wish another dead should ask what Jesus would do.
I am sorry if my silly humour confused, but my mind gets bored at times.
Happy and Holy Christmas to all.


#16

Wow. I always thought that Japan did not allow capital punishment. I am saddened to see that I was wrong.


#17

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