Jealousy or something else?


#1

So, I grew up in a poor family, not so poor as others but definitely on food stamps and free lunches at school, and no one in my family was employed from 2013-ish onwards. Here at college, I’m being exposed to people who don’t have anything to worry about when it comes to school. I have my first year covered by scholarships, but after that if I don’t get enough I will have to drop out of college because I refuse to get loans and be in debt for a good chunk of my life. Anyway back to what I was saying, so many of these kids can get the expensive, healthy food on campus, the fancier dorms and computers, have vehicles and go off campus to do fun things all the time, and I wish I could do stuff like that too. There’s some trips my campus parish people will be taking, the wellness center has cavern exploring and horseback riding, there’s a polo club on campus that has horse riding lessons, and there’s all sorts of cool, wonderful things I can’t do because I can’t afford it. I know jealously is a sin, but what’s the difference between that and just wishing and longing for things?


#2

Here In Australia, many students are really poor. They can’t even feed themselves more then plain rice. But there are positives, not affording the social life means study, and getting on with it, and not failing because the focus became social life.

Horse riding would be an absolute luxury activity here, so go for it and caverning. Don’t be jealous, just think of your degree and the work you will do once you have it.


#3

I would love to do the horseback riding and stuff but I can’t afford it unless I decide to use some of my money I have saved up for a truck (although I don’t have a drivers license and frankly I hate driving so putting that off wouldn’t bother me much) But also thank you so much for reminding me there are upsides to not having the same social/economic status as others :slight_smile:️ that was part of the reason I had all A’s in high school, I didn’t go out and do things or miss school so I had more time to focus on doing well.


#4

yes, and then we appreciate all the opportunities so much more because their value is a struggle for us to afford, as poor students :slight_smile:


#5

And it teaches humility as well, when I did get the opportunity to go to Washington DC for a school organization, I had to go to various businesses and ask the manager to support me, and it was a very humbling experience that I had the opportunity to go


#6

When I was in college, many of the profs asked about our personal lives. In the class ahead of mine, a student died from starvation. It really upset the staff! I had to take out loans to pay for my education. I am not sorry that I did because I was able to work in m chosen field. Check with financial aid offices. I did not do any expensive activities and I rode the bus to and from school.


#7

With the student loans, just get a deferment every year, that’s what I’ve been doing Anyway, I grew up poor (extremely poor), just because you can’t afford the things they do doesn’t mean you can’t do anything you want to. Find something else to do, that you can afford.


#8

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