Jeremy Corbyn: After-work drinks discriminate against mothers


#1

ITV:

Jeremy Corbyn: After-work drinks discriminate against mothers

Jeremy Corbyn has called on companies to end after-work drinks, claiming that “early evening socialisation” benefits men while discriminating against mothers. The Labour leader made his comments at an early evening event which launched a document detailing how Mr Corbyn’s flagship 10 pledges would advance gender equality for women, and tackle gendered violence and harassment.
Following the event, held at Unison’s offices, a drinks party was held.
According to Mr Corbyn an after-work drinks culture “benefits men who don’t feel the need to be at home looking after their children and it discriminates against women who will want to, obviously, look after the children that they have got”.

A spokesperson for the Jeremy for Labour campaign says the party leader is not calling for a ban on after-work drinks.

             Clearly this was not what Jeremy was suggesting, he instead  highlighted a concern among many women's groups and the head of the CBI  that a male-led after-work networking culture in some workplaces can be  detrimental to the career progression of female co-workers who can feel  excluded, especially those women with caring responsibilities.

Are pubs like boys’ treehouses with “no girls allowed” signs? Will men be in a better or worse mood if they have to rush home without their pint? Inquiring minds want to know.
Btw, what are Corbyn’s 10 pledges?


#2

I don’t understand. If it’s not mandated by work, and it’s a social thing, why is it “discrimination”? When we were little, didn’t we primarily keep to our friends and buddies, not going all over the place? “Xenophobia,” apparently.


#3

This is attempting morphing “equal opportunity” into “equal outcomes”. Workplace social events plays a part in career progression. Not being particularly social with one’s boss or co-workers can subtly result in fewer promotions or working special projects.


#4

Labour is in shambles and stuff like this is a big reason why.

Corbyn may be trying to get back into it after basically being called a racist even after towing the progressive line.


#5

I think the underlying argument (granted, the news article wasn’t clear) is that job promotions are tied to socializing with co-workers and bosses.

If women have a social obligation to look after their children, a cultural obligation men are not held to, then the after-work boozing may favor men with regard to workplace promotions.


#6

Corbyn is a Marxist loon but he’s being hounded by the UK press because he won’t play ball. Perfect example was Brexit where he was accused of running a half hearted campaign. I wouldn’t have him anywhere near No 10 but like Bernie Sanders (before he sold out) I did/do enjoy him giving the establishment a fright.

Just don’t vote him in as PM! :frowning: :eek:


#7

It’s because many deals are initiated and alliances forged during this type of after-work socialising. Believe me, as a woman who was once part of an all-male management team, I started attending their after-work drinks because I lost out if I didn’t.

I didn’t have kids to get home to, so it was no hardship to me except that it was something I really didn’t care to do. But I understand exactly what Corbyn is saying (and he’s not a “Marxist loon”, btw, as another poster called him - many of us sensible Labour voters are behind him 100%).


#8

:rotfl:

[sorry]


#9

:wink: Believe me when I say, they walk among us…


#10

Mr. Corbyn, have a pint with the lads and get off yerself, man. :slight_smile:


#11

That would mean the lads having to put up with an Islington odd ball with no sense of humour.

Poor lads :frowning:


#12

Welcome to 2016, where stuff you’re not interested in or that doesn’t fit your schedule equals “discrimination”. :rolleyes:


#13

One of the measures of performance in some places is how well one gets along with others which includes after hours socializing. I prefer not to drink or hang out after work. But I do so for the sake of my performance reviews. I have a friend that chooses not to drink at all. She was let go because the manager said by not drinking she was not engaging her team. I would say that it is not just women that it puts at a disadvantage, but any one that has responsibilities and obligations elsewhere. Though the article ,at be saying that mothers is the largest segment that this practice puts at a disadvantage.


#14

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