Jesus and "The Test"?


#1

I was reading the New American Bible, and noticed that Jesus refers to “the test” multiple times. One example is Luke 22:46 when he says “Get up, and pray that you may not have to undergo the test.” Can anyone please explain what Jesus is meaning by the test?


#2

Shhhh! Don’t let anyone know, but in order to get into heaven, you have to pass a 100-question, multiple-choice algebra test! :wink:

The word that’s being used there in Luke is the same word that’s in the Lord’s Prayer ("lead us not into temptation). The word can be used in either way, either as a ‘temptation’ in a negative sense or a ‘test’ in a positive sense. In a negative sense, it’s being tempted to do the wrong thing, and resisting that temptation. In a positive sense, it’s being asked to do the right thing, and having the resolve to actually succeed.

Jesus is telling the apostles that, if they were tested on Holy Thursday, it would be a difficult test – and therefore, they should pray that they themselves not be asked to undertake such a difficult trial.

Of course, you could go with the ‘algebra test’ thing, too, if you want. :wink:


#3

Loved this friendly, humorous answer:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl: Then thought - Glad you were joking as I’m effectively anumerate! :rolleyes:


#4

The ‘test’ He is talking about I believe are the temptations of the Devil (temptation to sin). In other words, I believe He is not saying so much that you may not have to undergo a test (e.g. temptations) for we all have them; but more, that you may not succumb to the temptations of the Devil.

I believe the following may help -

I hope this has helped

God Bless

Thank you for reading
Josh

haha :smiley:


#5

This is wonderful news!!! Someone told me it was a Blue Book exam, and I know I stand a better chance with a Scantron!:smiley:


#6

I believe it means at the hour of our death. That is the moment of finality.

“Hail Mary, …and at the HOUR or our death.”

May the God of hope fill you with every joy.


#7

Interesting… so, you’re suggesting that Jesus is telling the apostles “pray that you will not face death tonight”? That’s an interesting suggestion. Why would Jesus try to intimidate them with something that He knows is not in the works?


#8

I thought it had to do with the difference between dying while under the Law vs. dying after knowing Jesus (1Cor 13:12-19).

As if the Law judgment format was a version of the Feather of Truth:

“Maat’s primary role in Egyptian mythology dealt with the weighing of souls (also called the weighing of the heart) that took place in the underworld, Duat.[2] Her feather was the measure that determined whether the souls (considered to reside in the heart) of the departed would reach the paradise of afterlife successfully.”

Saw a cute skit on Christian TV the other day and it’s on YouTube:

youtube.com/watch?v=XrLzYw6ULYw ((The Good-O-Meter))

Either we have Perfect Jesus who walks ahead of us/covers us, or we don’t. At least those are the only two scenarios I’m aware of.


#9

Martyrdom.

Peace


#10

So, Jesus was telling the apostles, “pray that you won’t be asked to put your life on the line for the faith”? Whatever happened to “your will, not mine”…? :hmmm:


#11

Simple Easy- Test is temptation… Temptation is always around us so praying to be relieved of it makes sense.
Martyrdom was sought by early Christians…
Death is the end of the test.
After death is when your life is graded. Pray to get an A+.


#12

Well no, I don’t mean to say that they will face the final moment that night, but that when the final moment does come that they will be able to undergo it without failure. For of all the trials and tribulations we will undergo, that one particular moment or hour is the one that is the ultimate moment of decision. It all finally comes down to that one moment.

And the Hail Mary which we so often pray, is asking for help at that particular moment which is the last chance we have before our final end is determined…the moment of THE test which will be the last one and will endure forever.

May divine mercy, peace, and love be yours in ever greater measure.


#13

Hmmm… but, if that’s what He meant, wouldn’t it make sense to say “pray that you will pass the test” and not “pray that you may not undergo the test”? After all, each of us will undergo “the final test”; why would He ask them to pray that they not experience something that you say we all experience?

Blessings,
G.


#14

“undergoing” means something has to be worked out or is being worked out. So to me it means that this test will not be undergone if one is ready…it will be a foregone conclusion.
“undergoing” seems to indicate some sort of sweating it out.

May God bless and keep you. May God’s face shine on you. May God be kind to you and give you peace.


#15

=Jake Hansen;12534156]I was reading the New American Bible, and noticed that Jesus refers to “the test” multiple times. One example is Luke 22:46 when he says “Get up, and pray that you may not have to undergo the test.” Can anyone please explain what Jesus is meaning by the test?

It means the duplicitousness of Satan… “The father of lies” John 8:44 :thumbsup:


#16

Same question that I asked Fred, then: why would Jesus ask the apostles to pray for deliverance from something that He knew wasn’t going to happen? :wink:


#17

Why pray for anything if God knows what will happen?

In the old testiment when God identified himself to Moses, he said, “I am who am”.

There is therefore no such thing as foreknowledge in God, from his viewpoint it is only present knowledge. He said “I am…” and every event, choice, is present to him including all “pre” and “post” knowledge of us we might have. Tho I understand this about God, I can not fathom it, because it is beyond my mental capacity to grasp it, just as it is beyond my capacity to fathom heaven or the Trinity. It is beyond our weak intellect to grasp the infinite mind of God to know what he knows since it is knowledge of everything. We have limits which he dosen’t.

But this is beyond the limits of this thread.

May God our Father give you grace and peace.


#18

Right: we don’t know, but God does. But, this is a different sort of circumstance: this is Jesus telling the apostles to pray. The Son of God – who knows what the next 24 hours holds in store – is telling the apostles to pray for something regarding themselves. The question I’m asking isn’t why they should pray, but why Jesus would tell them to pray for something that He knows is not going to befall them…? :shrug:

There is therefore no such thing as foreknowledge in God, from his viewpoint it is only present knowledge.

Agreed; but, to our perspective, it’s ‘foreknowledge’, and Paul calls it precisely that. So, inasmuch as Jesus shared in that foreknowledge – since He knew what was coming up – how can we make sense of exegesis that has Him telling the apostles to pray for a counterfactual? That just doesn’t make sense to me…


#19

=Gorgias;12547190]Same question that I asked Fred, then: why would Jesus ask the apostles to pray for deliverance from something that He knew wasn’t going to happen? :wink:

What Jesus asked as a “mortal man” was NOT that He be excised form His Passion. No, what He asked the Apostles to pray for was that He would have the courage and strength to complete the Mission given to Him by the Father.:thumbsup:

God Bless,
Patrick


#20

Patrick,

This doesn’t seem right, either: Jesus didn’t tell them “pray that I will pass the test,” but rather, “pray that you will not undergo the test.”


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