Jesus died on Good Friday?


#1

If Jesus died on Good Friday and rose on Easter Sunday, how is that 3 days that He was gone?


#2

[quote="aball1035, post:1, topic:320833"]
If Jesus died on Good Friday and rose on Easter Sunday, how is that 3 days that He was gone?

[/quote]

Jewish tradition is when the sun sets its a new day. You can see evidence of this in fiddler on the roof when everyone is rushing like mad to get work done before it got dark Friday night. (Saturday is the sabbath mind you)

So Jesus dies Friday at 3pm, sun sets its Sat, sun sets again its Sunday.

3 days but the wording is 'on the third day' not '72 hrs later'


#3

[quote="Kithrus, post:2, topic:320833"]
Jewish tradition is when the sun sets its a new day. You can see evidence of this in fiddler on the roof when everyone is rushing like mad to get work done before it got dark Friday night. (Saturday is the sabbath mind you)

So Jesus dies Friday at 3pm, sun sets its Sat, sun sets again its Sunday.

3 days but the wording is 'on the third day' not '72 hrs later'

[/quote]

Yep. It's hard for us to remember that our ancestors counted time differently. So consider this - the Last Supper Passover meal happened on the same "day" as the Crucifixion because it would have been sunset to sunset as one day (in modern terms, Thursday night to sunset Friday). Then sunset Friday to sunset Saturday is Day 2, and sunset on Saturday to sunset Sunday is the 3rd Day. As posted above, the 3rd day is any time between those sunsets - not exactly 72 hours later. That's why Easter vigil Mass can be rightly celebrated on Holy Saturday - as long as it is after sunset! My dad knew this well so after Easter Vigil Mass, we got to break out the candy and goodies we had given up for Lent and start the fest! We even got to stay up well past our bedtimes!

This way of counting time is also why Saturday evening Mass fulfills the Sunday obligation.


#4

The first day is Friday, the second Saturday, and on the third day, Sunday, He rose again.


#5

As has been mentioned, the people of that time counted days differently. Any part of a day was considered a day. Jesus died on Friday day one. He was burried before sunset. At sunset it became the second day. At sunset Saturday, it became the third day. Jesus didn’t resurrect until dawn on Sunday.


#6

Wouldn’t that interpretation equal 3 days (Fri, Sat, Sun) and only 2 nights (Fri, Sat nights)? I thought it was 3 nights


#7

IF jesus was killed on Friday, and was to rise three days later…that would be monday… someone please help me here!


#8

This should help:
catholic.com/quickquestions/was-christ-really-in-the-tomb-for-three-days


#9

Here is a link that may help:
catholic.com/quickquestions/was-christ-really-in-the-tomb-for-three-days


#10

i’m satisfied! Thanks!


#11

Happy to help :thumbsup:


#12

[quote="aball1035, post:1, topic:320833"]
If Jesus died on Good Friday and rose on Easter Sunday, how is that 3 days that He was gone?

[/quote]

Friday, Saturday, Sunday.


#13

[quote="aball1035, post:6, topic:320833"]
Wouldn't that interpretation equal 3 days (Fri, Sat, Sun) and only 2 nights (Fri, Sat nights)? I thought it was 3 nights

[/quote]

The Jews considered part of the day to include both day and night, at least that's what my Shorter Summa (Aquinas) says. :shrug:


#14

The Jewish Perspective:

Someone should explain this to the Jews or at least be able to find a single Jewish source for these “calculations”.

According to Matthew 12:38-40 Jesus was to be buried “in the heart of the earth” for three days and three nights".

Just as you would calculate a day from midnight to midnight, Jews calculate a day from after sundown with the appearance of three stars to after sundown with the appearance of three stars. For all intense and purposes, basically the same thing.

Now according to Luke, Jesus was put in the earth Friday before sundown (see Luke 23:54-55 ,Luke 28:1)

Jesus, according to the Christian scriptures, was resurrected on Sunday morning at or before dawn (Matthew 28:1,John 20:1)

Now if we calculate that any part day of Friday before sundown is a day, then we can conclude that Jesus was in the earth for three days. However, there is no calculation, Jewish,Christian,scientific or any other that Jesus was buried in the earth for three nights. According to the Christian scriptures Jesus was buried in the earth for two nights, Friday night and Saturday night.

Christians claim that Jesus was a Jewish prophet (Matthew 14:5,John 4:44)

They also consider him a god and part of their concept of the trinity. According to Torah, a prophet is a person chosen by God to communicate His will (see Deuteronomy 18:18). So according to Christianity, God can be His own prophet, at the same time both a prophet or messenger of God and God Himself.

Now even if we can overcome the problematic’s of God as His own prophet, we are left with the fact that Jesus falsely prophesied that he would be three nights in the earth and is therefore, according to the Jewish scriptures, a false prophet.

As a prophet is someone chosen by God to speak in His name, if God truly speaks through the mouth of a prophet, every prophesy will come true. The failure of even the most minor detail of a prophesy to not come true is proof that God is not the source of the prophesy. It was precisely to prevent individuals from pretending to be a prophet that the Torah imposes the death penalty for false prophesy:

Deuteronomy 18:18-22:

  1. I will set up a prophet for them from among their brothers like you, and I will put My words into his mouth, and he will speak to them all that I command him.

  2. And it will be, that whoever does not hearken to My words that he
    speaks in My name, I will exact [it] of him.

  3. But the prophet who intentionally speaks a word in My name, which I did not command him to speak, or who speaks in the name of other gods, that prophet shall die.

  4. Now if you say to yourself, “How will we know the word that the Lord did not speak?”

  5. If the prophet speaks in the name of the Lord, and the thing does not occur and does not come about, that is the thing the Lord did not speak. The prophet has spoken it wantonly; you shall not be afraid of him.


#15

The Jewish Lunar Calendar had to be re-adjusted 10-11 days each year to be in synch with the Solar Calendar, and even the Solar Calendar had it error within it.
So to put faith in the data, you have to assume there has been NO error in 2,000 years of record-keeping, throw scores of civilizations and disasters. And you have to assume that there is no error or hyperbole in the original texts, and that the intervening translations were accurate, and that our interpretations of the ancient writings are also accurate.
I think an A.D. 36 crucifixion date fits well for many reasons.


#16

According to what I’m reading, it seems like in Luke 23-24 Christ died on Thursday about or after 3pm. He said he would rise in 3 days. That’s not “three nights and three days” but rather “three days” as he said.

So…
Day 1 - Luke 23:54 - “It was the day of preparation, and the sabbath was about to begin.” - So Luke is giving us “possibly” a new day here of preparation. If the Church disagrees, it’s Friday. It doesn’t make a difference much. Since it’s before the Sabbath, that is only Friday. 1 day

Day 2 - Luke 23:56 - “… Then they rested on the sabbath according to the commandment.” - That’s Saturday. 2 days now. The author makes no claim this day, but it was restful. Quiet.

Day 3 - Luke 24:1 The author’s focus is Sunday. “But at daybreak on the first day of the week…” And “It was already opened” And the angel saying Luke 24:7, “… Remember what he said… and rise on the third day.” - day 3. That’s Sunday.

So he rose early in the morning on Sunday.

As of hours, I heard that Christ wasn’t speaking technically of a full 72 hours since his last breath, which I’m sure some try to break the hours down to specifics to justify Saturday (SDA’s and other 7th day churches have tried this claim), but he was rather speaking of 3 days - 3 risings of the sun. Interesting how the author gives no focus to Saturday other than “they rested,” but he rather dives in on Sunday as a big celebration in his writing. And of course, we see the apostles celebrating on Sunday, meaning even they took Sunday as a third day then. Otherwise there’s no reason to celebrate on Sunday, but rather Saturday (before evening).

At any rate, Christ died close or on Thursday evening (which would have been known as Friday since evening is a new morning in Jewish tradition). Good Friday is still day 1 (1st rise of the sun). I guess what I’m saying is Thursday 3pm is really close to evening. I don’t know of the time gap between that, but they would have been rushing for preparation because the Sabbath was near.


#17

Philv, your source is in error. The sabbath was the day immediately following the Crucifixion. This is why it reads, The Jews therefore, because it was the preparation, that the bodies should not remain upon the cross on the sabbath day, (for that sabbath day was an high day,) besought Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away (John 19:31). St. John wouldn’t say this if the Sabbath were a whole day away. The evangelists also note that Christ was entombed before evening, so the day of his Crucifixion (Good Friday) is the first day that he was in the tomb. Therefore, we have three days: Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Christ rose on Sunday, the third day, just as he said. Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day (Luke 24:46).

If we say that Christ did not die on Friday, we have to say that the immemorial Liturgy of the Church is in error.


#18

That is why some have postulated a Thursday crucifixion. However it creates more problems than it solves.

May I throw out an idea for consideration? Could it be that the deep darkness which covered the land be considered the first ‘night.’ Just a thought. :twocents:


#19

I like the thought, Cyberseeker. I will remember that one. However, I am content to say that “three days and three nights” just means “three days” according to the Jewish idiom.


#20

Yeah, that makes sense.


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