Jesus Fully Human?


#1

I read that the Coptic Rite (and other Eastern Rites) holds that Jesus was divine but not human or not fully human. Can’t it be believed that Jesus could do all that He did for us (Redemption, Atonement, etc.) and not have been completely human? How would disregarding the complete humanity of Christ affect the Theology of Christianity?


#2

Jesus had to be fully human in order to make propitiation for the sins of the race of Adam and Eve. No humanity, no sacrifice for humanity.


#3

But if He is God then He could make propitiation for our sins as God.


#4

[quote=PDR1234]I read that the Coptic Rite (and other Eastern Rites) holds that Jesus was divine but not human or not fully human. Can’t it be believed that Jesus could do all that He did for us (Redemption, Atonement, etc.) and not have been completely human? How would disregarding the complete humanity of Christ affect the Theology of Christianity?
[/quote]

Quite profoundly.

If Jesus Christ were not fully human, then the Second Adam, who reconciled the descendants of the first Adam to God the Father was no “Adam” at all.

If Jesus Christ were not fully divine, and a mere man died on the cross, then what good was done on Good Friday?

The person of Jesus Christ was the subject of some of the earliest heresies in the church. They were confronted in the first few centuries of the church’s history.

Blessings,

Gerry


#5

[quote=PDR1234]I read that the Coptic Rite (and other Eastern Rites) holds that Jesus was divine but not human or not fully human. Can’t it be believed that Jesus could do all that He did for us (Redemption, Atonement, etc.) and not have been completely human? How would disregarding the complete humanity of Christ affect the Theology of Christianity?
[/quote]

Yes, you may find some of the early Christological heresy in the Eastern ORTHODOX Church, not the Eastern Catholic Church. Be careful not to mix the two when reading about the “Eastern Church”.


#6

[quote=PDR1234]I read that the Coptic Rite (and other Eastern Rites) holds that Jesus was divine but not human or not fully human. Can’t it be believed that Jesus could do all that He did for us (Redemption, Atonement, etc.) and not have been completely human? How would disregarding the complete humanity of Christ affect the Theology of Christianity?
[/quote]

You may also be confusing “person” with “nature”. It is a dogma that Christ was one divine person with two natures (human and divine).

From the CCC:

**481 **Jesus Christ possesses two natures, one divine and the other human, not confused, but united in the one person of God’s Son.


#7

[quote=PDR1234]But if He is God then He could make propitiation for our sins as God.
[/quote]

If He were not likewise human, we should likewise deny that He ever suffered on the cross, because God, as God cannot suffer. Hence His Passion would not be truly sacrificial, but merely instructive. By assuming or clothing Himself with human nature, and becoming one like us, it became possible for Christ to feel pain, and suffer. Therefore we must confess that Christ is fully human, and fully divine, united in the one person of the Son.

Gerry :slight_smile:


#8

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]Yes, you may find some of the early Christological heresy in the Eastern ORTHODOX Church, not the Eastern Catholic Church. Be careful not to mix the two when reading about the “Eastern Church”.
[/quote]

I respectfully ask that you take back this slanderous statement regarding the Eastern Orthodox Church, of which the Copts are not in communion. The Eastern Orthodox Church holds fully to the beliefs stated by the seven ecumenical councils. The Copts reject Chalcedon and all the councils which followed.

John.


#9

[quote=prodromos]The Copts reject Chalcedon and all the councils which followed.

To reject Chalcedon is to accept the of the Monophysite heresy that this Catholic Church Council condemned.

[/quote]


#10

So, are they Monopysites, or not? That is interesting.


#11

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]To reject Chalcedon is to accept the of the Monophysite heresy that this Catholic Church Council condemned.
[/quote]

That is a wierd way of apologising :frowning:
As I stated before, the Eastern Orthodox Church holds fast to all of the Seven Ecumenical councils. There are no Christological heresies in the Eastern Orthodox Church. The Catholic church also believes this of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

I believe you are confusing us with someone else, but your post as it stands is slanderous.


#12

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