Jesus is"Lamb of God" because of sheep paper?


#1

I am in college and I had a philosophy professor tell me an interesting “fact” today. He was discussing how books used to be made from the stomach lining of sheep back in the middle ages and earlier. So, when it is said that “Jesus is the Word”, or the “Word of God” and lastly, the “Lamb of God”, it is somewhat (or completely) referring to the actual physical pages. In other words, because the Bible is the Word of God and so is Jesus, since the Bible is made out of sheep (lamb), we get that Jesus is the “lamb” of God. Is this just a pun gone horribly wrong? OR, does it have to do with English translation? Or is it just terribly misguided? Thank you!


#2

you can safely say it is a pun…

the best advice i can give you about college…

if college serves no other purpose then to cause you to ask why…

then it has served it purpose…

other than that… keep your parascope up on some of those professors… they have no idea the damage they do sometimes… and they can do damage, unintentionally sometimes… sometimes not:cool:


#3

I think it’s an attempt at a post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. . . After this, therefore because of this.

IOW, parchment was used (sheepskin or goatskin).
Jesus was referred to in the Bible as “Lamb of God” and “Word of God”.

Therefore, obviously, He was called this because parchment was made from sheepskin.

A fallacy, pure and simple.


#4

[quote=IsaacSheen]I am in college and I had a philosophy professor tell me an interesting “fact” today. He was discussing how books used to be made from the stomach lining of sheep back in the middle ages and earlier. So, when it is said that “Jesus is the Word”, or the “Word of God” and lastly, the “Lamb of God”, it is somewhat (or completely) referring to the actual physical pages. In other words, because the Bible is the Word of God and so is Jesus, since the Bible is made out of sheep (lamb), we get that Jesus is the “lamb” of God. Is this just a pun gone horribly wrong? OR, does it have to do with English translation? Or is it just terribly misguided? Thank you!
[/quote]

yes that makes sense…and sounds “cool/funny”…but obviously your professor has not done much bible reading. Jesus is referred to as the lamb in revelations. He was the lamb because the lamb was the ultimate sacrifice in jewish law, and jesus was the ultimate sacrifice, the innocent lamb without blemish. Jews in the O.T. were saved by spreading “the blood of the lamb” on their doorpost so death would pass them by. Then Jesus blood was shed for us.

You should do a little research…then ask him if he really believes this and where he heard it.


#5

I would go a little further than Space Ghost did. I would say that your professor is an idiot of a man. :mad: This is completely blasphemeous and heretical. :mad:

Jesus is the Lamb of God because he was the ultimate sacrifice. So much more perfect than the original Passover sacrifice. Ask your brilliant professor why God chose a lamb for the Passover meal to be the sacrifice. Ask him why the lamb had to be the first born and without blemish. Ask him why then the Israelites had to eat the lamb and were only spared by the “blood of the lamb” on their lentils and doorposts. Oh my goodness, this sounds like God was giving us a taste of the Ultimate Sacrifice made by His only (firstborn) and unblemished Son. This also sounds like the Eucharist. Is it a coincidence that Christs Passion all centered around Passover. Maybe, just maybe this is why John refers to Jesus as the Lamb of God.

It is amazing how PhD’s can dumb a person down. Please tell me this is not a Catholic college you attend.

May God Bless You, and good luck in you classes.


#6

[quote=Seven Sorrows]yes that makes sense…and sounds “cool/funny”…but obviously your professor has not done much bible reading. Jesus is referred to as the lamb in revelations. He was the lamb because the lamb was the ultimate sacrifice in jewish law, and Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice, the innocent lamb without blemish. Jews in the O.T. were saved by spreading “the blood of the lamb” on their doorpost so death would pass them by. Then Jesus blood was shed for us.

You should do a little research…then ask him if he really believes this and where he heard it.
[/quote]

This is exactly correct!!!I would add that the OT sacrifices were imperfect and did not offer eternal salvation, and the sacrifice of the Lamb was the perfect sacrifice which did in fact save us.


#7

Near the beginning of Exodus, when Moses was telling the Jews the orders that God had given about what they were to do before leaving Egypt, the sort of came up. They were to “sacrifice” a lamb. It must be the first born and unblemished. The blood of this lamb must be put on the door frame, and the flesh eaten. No flesh was to be left after the meal. If there were any left, it was to be burnt.

Then Jesus came along, and John the baptist called him “the Lamb of God who will take away the sins of the world.” Jesus was more than this. He was “sacrificed” during the passover. His blood “causes” God to “passover” our sins. Also, we are to “eat” his flesh. That is the Eucharist. I think your professor needs to go back to school himself.


#8

[quote=jaz1976]Jesus is the Lamb of God because he was the ultimate sacrifice. So much more perfect than the original Passover sacrifice. Ask your brilliant professor why God chose a lamb for the Passover meal to be the sacrifice. Ask him why the lamb had to be the first born and without blemish. Ask him why then the Israelites had to eat the lamb and were only spared by the “blood of the lamb” on their lentils and doorposts. Oh my goodness, this sounds like God was giving us a taste of the Ultimate Sacrifice made by His only (firstborn) and unblemished Son. This also sounds like the Eucharist. Is it a coincidence that Christs Passion all centered around Passover. Maybe, just maybe this is why John refers to Jesus as the Lamb of God.
[/quote]

Just to reiterate, God ordered that the paschal lamb had to be eaten (Exodus 12:8, 46). And after a thousand years of imperfect sacrifice, to hear John the Baptist proclaim: “Behold the Lamb of God” is perfect beauty.


#9

Your professor’s explanation of the phrase “lamb of God” is the funniest thing I’ve heard in a long time. Talk about your popular (and false) etymologies!


#10

Your professor obviously got his “BS” degree from Dan Brown’s school of fictional theology.

Just as others have stated, the term “Lamb of God” comes from the Old Testament, forshadowing the new.


#11

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