"Jesus Pray for Us." v.s. Lord hear our prayer


#1

Our pastor introduced this change to our response in the prayers of the faithful last week.

I don’t like it. It suggests to me that Jesus is not coeternal and not consubstantial with God. It suggests He merely intercedes for us like the Mother of God or other saints. It suggests that He is not God.

Does this sound like Arianism revisited to anyone else?


#2

Yessir, it sounds to me that the priest has been breathing too much of the Liberal air from the left-wing state - Oregon. The priest wants make you think tha Jesus is NOT one of the three personalities of the Trinity it seems. That Jesus IS NOT God.


#3

I don’t like that EVEN ONE LITTLE BIT why on Earth? It makes Jesus sound like a Saint or Angel rather than a member of the Trinity. This is seriously problematic. Is Jesus going to pray to Himself? Makes no sense!

This is troubling to me, send it to the “Ask an Apologist” and see what advice they can give you. This is disturbing.


#4

I prefer “Lord have mercy!”


#5

[quote=Seattle.RC]Our pastor introduced this change to our response in the prayers of the faithful last week.

I don’t like it. It suggests to me that Jesus is not coeternal and not consubstantial with God. It suggests He merely intercedes for us like the Mother of God or other saints. It suggests that He is not God.

Does this sound like Arianism revisited to anyone else?
[/quote]

:eek: :eek: :eek:

Jesus Christ is Our Lord and Our God - therefore, we do not ask for His prayers.

Complication - He is also Our great High Priest (see Hebrews 7) and as such “He lives to makes intercession for us”. (Which is perhaps what your priest had in mind.) And, it is quite true, that for the first two centuries it was thought unfitting to address prayer to Him; prayer was offered to the Father,“in [His] Name”, as He Himself commanded.

However, His intercession and mediation is not entirely like that of the Saints: for it is universal; needs no prompting from us but is, rather, the cause of our awareness of our needs; and is the intercession of One Who knows us intimately and entirely. He does not simply intercede - He is also Our Mediator: that is, He both prays on our behalf to His Father, and, “bridges the gap” between His Father and us: no creature can do this - He identifies Himself with us, and already has the interests of His Father at heart also.

FWIW - it seems curious to change the form of prayer provided in the Liturgy.

Instead of worrying about your priest’s orthodoxy - why not ask him why he did as he did ? ##


#6

I completelyagree,
Thats not good at all. It clearly suggests that Jesus is outside of God. Lord hear our prayer
Love Always In Christ,
April


#7

I completelyagree,
Thats not good at all. It clearly suggests that Jesus is outside of God. Lord hear our prayer
Love Always In Christ,
April


#8

[quote=Seattle.RC]Our pastor introduced this change to our response in the prayers of the faithful last week.

I don’t like it. It suggests to me that Jesus is not coeternal and not consubstantial with God. It suggests He merely intercedes for us like the Mother of God or other saints. It suggests that He is not God.

Does this sound like Arianism revisited to anyone else?
[/quote]

I don’t know enough about Arianism to answer your question. I will say, though, that a primary apologetic defense about praying to saints is that when we pray to saints we say “Pray for us” because on their own they can do nothing for us. When we pray to God we say “Have mercy on us” or “Hear our prayer” or something of that sort–certainly not “Pray for us.” The idea of asking Jesus to pray for us undercuts that defense completely. I don’t like it at all; I would consider taking the matter up with the bishop. Someone else has suggested asking an apologist here; this would be an excellent first step. But the bishop is the only person who can do anything about it, if you decide that something should be done about it.

  • Liberian

#9

Invocations to God the Father, Jesus, or the Holy Spirit, and stuff identified with them (Lamb of God, Sacred Heart, for example) are always answered with “Have mercy on us” in litanies. Invocations to the saints, including our Lady, are answered with “Pray for us.”


#10

I myself have heard of this but I can’t for the life of me remember if it has even been in my own parish! I am really glad to have read this post as I had questioned it myself but for some reason have been “asleep at the wheel” about the matter. I will be watching “Ask an Apologist” myself to find out what they say.

Blessings,
Teelynn

“St. Michael the Archangel defend us in battle”…


#11

In the footnote on Romans 8:35-38, in the 1859 edition of Haydock’s Catholic Family Bible and Commentary, it says, in part:

In fine, another argument to prove we ought to have a firm hope in God, is that Christ Jesus, who sits at the right hand of God, also intercedeth for us. Christ, as man, intercedeth, prayeth for us, is our advocate and chief mediator See Hebrews vii. Christ is truly said to pray for us in heaven, though it is not the custom of the Church to call upon him in this manner, “Christ pray for us;” because being God, as well as man, he has all things under his command.


#12

I have heard this same change at Mass, but can’t remember where. It might have been at a Life Teen Mass. shudder I agree, I don’t care for it either.

:wink:
cecilia


#13

Sounds like Liturgical abuse. :eek:


#14

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.