Jesus without original Sin


#1

Posted by Todd Easton
Even after baptism, your soul (and mine) suffers from the effects of Original Sin (concupiscence). Jesus’ soul (and Mary’s soul) did not suffer from the effects of Original sin while he (and she) walked the earth.

This might sound dumb to some of ya’ll but, please humor me. If Jesus didn’t have to deal with any of the bad effects of Original Sin wouldn’t that have lessend his sacrifice scince it wasn’t hard for him not to sin?


#2

[quote=Montie Claunch]This might sound dumb to some of ya’ll but, please humor me. If Jesus didn’t have to deal with any of the bad effects of Original Sin wouldn’t that have lessend his sacrifice scince it wasn’t hard for him not to sin?
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Baptism takes away both original sin and actual sin.


#3

[quote=Montie Claunch]This might sound dumb to some of ya’ll but, please humor me. If Jesus didn’t have to deal with any of the bad effects of Original Sin wouldn’t that have lessend his sacrifice scince it wasn’t hard for him not to sin?
[/quote]

That would be true IF Jesus’ sacrifice was not sinning. In reality, his sacrifice was dying a long and painful death for a pathetic creature infinitely below his level of glory. Jesus’ sinlessness didn’t prevent him from feeling physical pain. And it made him feel all the more sorrow at knowing how much we sin.


#4

[quote=Montie Claunch]This might sound dumb to some of ya’ll but, please humor me. If Jesus didn’t have to deal with any of the bad effects of Original Sin wouldn’t that have lessend his sacrifice scince it wasn’t hard for him not to sin?
[/quote]

I wouldn’t say that it wasn’t hard for Him not to sin, just that it wasn’t impossible. Also, the nature of the sacrifice has more to do with uniting the human and divine natures. Human nature, in this theological context, has nothing to do with concupiscence.


#5

[quote=Kristina P.]I wouldn’t say that it wasn’t hard for Him not to sin, just that it wasn’t impossible. Also, the nature of the sacrifice has more to do with uniting the human and divine natures. Human nature, in this theological context, has nothing to do with concupiscence.
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OTC, Kristina, it was quite impossible for Him to sin, since He is God Incarnate and God cannot sin. This is the teaching of the Church, that the God-Man was impeccable (could not sin).

Christ as a healer must have what He is going to share, i.e., must be fully, i.e., perfectly human and Divine or He could not heal us. He gives us the health, as it were, He has. If He did not have this health we, being sick, could not receive healing.

He therefore has the fully human nature, i.e., one not wounded by sin. His humanity is therefore graced and in harmony with the Divine. For us to be tending toward sin is for us not to be fully human; therefore we are not the vantage point of healing of our wounded nature but He is. It follows that for Him to heal our infirmity He must bring health to our infirmity. We can’t give what we don’t have, so He must have this health of being fully human, i.e., in harmony with God in order to give it to us by grace. He therefore could not sin, which makes him perfectly human, not less human.


#6

Hebrews 4:15
For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet was without sin.

Adam and Eve did not have orginal sin and were able to be tempted.

so this really is not a problem.


#7

[quote=FCEGM]OTC, Kristina, it was quite impossible for Him to sin, since He is God Incarnate and God cannot sin. This is the teaching of the Church, that the God-Man was impeccable (could not sin).

Christ as a healer must have what He is going to share, i.e., must be fully, i.e., perfectly human and Divine or He could not heal us. He gives us the health, as it were, He has. If He did not have this health we, being sick, could not receive healing.

He therefore has the fully human nature, i.e., one not wounded by sin. His humanity is therefore graced and in harmony with the Divine. For us to be tending toward sin is for us not to be fully human; therefore we are not the vantage point of healing of our wounded nature but He is. It follows that for Him to heal our infirmity He must bring health to our infirmity. We can’t give what we don’t have, so He must have this health of being fully human, i.e., in harmony with God in order to give it to us by grace. He therefore could not sin, which makes him perfectly human, not less human.
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Sorry, I realize my error in wording there. I meant that it wasn’t impossible for Him not to sin. The double negative kind of makes it hard to read. Of course I don’t believe the divine nature could sin. I just meant that the inability to sin wasn’t due to lacking the taint of original sin. Your second paragraph, by the way, is wonderfully eloquent and precisely true.


#8

But, If Jesus couldn’t sin, Why did Satan tempt Jesus out in the wilderness? Why waste his time? Why not go for someone who could acctually sin? Please help me I am a really trying to figure this out. Thanks and God bless.


#9

[quote=Montie Claunch]But, If Jesus couldn’t sin, Why did Satan tempt Jesus out in the wilderness? Why waste his time? Why not go for someone who could acctually sin? Please help me I am a really trying to figure this out. Thanks and God bless.
[/quote]

Montie, remember that Satan did not know Who the Lord Jesus was. He would have recognized, though, that this was a man “dangerous” to his evil intent and therefore would have done his utmost to foil whatever God’s plans were through this individual (not unlike his temptations of us).

So the Lord experienced “temptation” in a way as we do. But in another way He doesn’t; He was not bent towards sin. He would not have experienced inordinate lust or greed, or gluttony, etc… His trials came from outside though they are experienced inside, e.g., suffering and death. While He has consciousness of being the Son, in His sacred humanity He is able to suffer from forces outside Himself (hunger, thirst, obduracy of others, etc.); and as Man He acquired sensible knowledge, had human emotions and thus could feel sorrow and fear; so He brings what He encounters in His Body to His Father because He is in relation to Him and is the Perfect Man at prayer, submitting His human will (Christ Jesus has two wills, Divine and Human) to the Will of the Father.

Further, realize that it is abnormal for human nature to suffer and die. Our Lord chose to suffer and die. Again, temptation for Him is not exactly the same as for us. The world and the devil would tempt Him from outside, but there was no concupiscence in Him that could pull Him towards sin within His humanity. What He experienced in the Passion is the natural repulsion of the flesh which ought not to die, is not supposed to die, to undergo that separation of body and soul.

Since He was fully human, He would have felt this separation and its preliminaries more than we do. Moreover, He would have felt the abandonment of His Father more than we do (since He was closer to Him than we ever were or could be). It is because He could not sin that when he undergoes this separation of death.


#10

[quote=Montie Claunch]This might sound dumb to some of ya’ll but, please humor me. If Jesus didn’t have to deal with any of the bad effects of Original Sin wouldn’t that have lessend his sacrifice scince it wasn’t hard for him not to sin?
[/quote]

You forget - Jesus was God…the Word Incarnate…God cannot sin…


#11

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