Jesus


#1

Do you ever wonder what Jesus was like on a regular basis?

I was reading the gospels recently and it struck me that although Jesus was certainly an intriguing teacher, he doesn’t strike me as someone who was particularly friendly.

I’m guessing that has to do with the fact that the gospels spend a lot of time covering his dealings with arrogant people who are trying to trap him, or with people that are just asking stupid questions. I wonder what a regular day would be like with Jesus when he wasn’t preaching.


#2

Of course I wonder, but I may never know, therefore I try not to make the mistake by attempting to define Him. I can think about it, I can guess, but I can’t be sure.

Ironically Yours, Blade and Blood


#3

Some verses of the gentle side of Jesus…

Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of heaven belongs. I tell you solemnly, anyone who does not welcome the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” Then He put His arms around them, laid His hands on them and gave them His blessing.” [Mark 10:14-16]

“Jesus exclaimed, ‘I bless You, Father, Lord of heaven and of earth, for hiding these things from the learned and clever and revealing them to mere children. Yes, Father, for that is what it pleased You to do.” [Matthew 11:25-26]

.“Anyone who welcomes a little child like this in my name welcomes Me.” [Matthew 18:5]

“Shoulder your yoke and learn from Me, for I am gentle and humble of heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” [Matthew 11:29-30]

Jesus wept for his friend even though he knew He was shortly going to raise him from the dead.
He spent time with His friends, Mary and Martha, and defended Mary when Martha criticised her.

When he wanted to go off to grieve and pray after He’d heard of his cousin’s beheading, but the crowds were clamouring after Him, He “took pity on them” and gave up his intention and joined to crowds to teach them.

Stories He told, like the lost sheep, [Luke 15 4-7] show His compassion.

His teaching on ‘love of enemies’ eg [Luke 6 verses 27-35]

His teaching about forgiveness.

His teaching to ‘love others as you love yourself’

Teachings of a loving heart, of a loving man.

I could keep going! :slight_smile:


#4

You should watch the movie “The Gospel of John” (2003). That will probably change your mind.


#5

Oh, I think He was very friendly otherwise children would have not come to Him. Do you remember when the children came to Him and the disciples wanted them to leave?


#6

C. S. Lewis comments in his book Mere Christianity, that he found Jesus to be shy. Espescialy shy in regards to one aspect of his personality," his mirth."


#7

Yeah, that’s all very true that he taught many loving concepts, but many of his personal encounters with other people just don’t strike me as particularly friendly. He seems like an intriguing teacher, but not somebody I’d want to have a beer with.

But perhaps that it is a good thing.


#8

Very honest people and straightforward people are often not perceived as being very friendly. It probably is a positive quality of Jesus. When it comes right down to it, the compassion and love a person demonstrates in actions throughout their life is not the same thing qualitatively as friendliness.

“For this sake I came into the world, to testify to the truth.”


#9

:wink: Why not? Evidently quite a few people didnt mind sharing wine with him at a wedding celebration and I bet he just didnt sit there with the Blessed Virgin and not ernjoy the party some, probably with friends and maybe even some familSeriously, if you think about Our Lord probably had the perfect well rounded personality, arfter all are we not called to imitate His perfection the best we can?


#10

Haha, true. :slight_smile:

Seriously, if you think about Our Lord probably had the perfect well rounded personality, arfter all are we not called to imitate His perfection the best we can?

It just doesn’t strike me that way. Especially in the gospel of John. If he wasn’t God, I might even say that he seems arrogant at times.


#11

well walking up to one, two or a group of people and inviting them to come visit him where he lives, to share a meal with him, to listen to him and converse with him sounds like a very good start to friendship. Supplying a wedding feast with enough good wine to keep everyone cheerful for a week certainly shows he appreciated conviviality.


#12

That is pretty much how I see him too Puzzle!


#13

“Zacche;us, come down, I will dine in your house today.” sure sounds friendly to me.

“May I please have a drink of water.”

“Is no one left to judge you? then neither do I judge you, go and sin no more.”

“If you recall an offense between yourself and a friend, leave your gift at the altar, go first and be reconciled, then make your sacrifice.”

Yes, I would say he certainly understands and values friendship.


#14

I understand what Awake is saying. Friendliness is different than sharing and loving behavior. I also understand what he or she meant by “arrogance”, though I think what Jesus displayed was the furthest thing from arrogance. Everything Jesus said was unencumbered truth, without apology, without pretension, and without acknowledgment of the social positions of people. That, in and of itself, can be construed as “arrogant”, though I would call it “truthful”.


#15

[quote=Awake]Yeah, that’s all very true that he taught many loving concepts, but many of his personal encounters with other people just don’t strike me as particularly friendly. He seems like an intriguing teacher, but not somebody I’d want to have a beer with.
[/quote]

I also have this feeing about Jesus and I am relieved to know that I am not alone. People have said “I can’t understand how you see Jesus the way you do. It’s not in the Bible." But that’s where my view comes from.

I was certainly brought up on the gentle Jesus who loved little children but not on the corollary of him always being meek and mild. But it was still a shock in my teen years to find another side of Jesus which I found displayed lack of compassion and understanding.

I do see the friendly compassionate side of Jesus but I am more struck by the opposite. Condemnation of people who were trying their best to live what they believed in or how they thought they should behave.

This includes the Pharisees and the Sadducees and especially the older brother in the parable of the Prodigal Son.

Maybe it would have helped if I had been taught that the parables were parables and while maybe based on actual events were not actual events.

Also wondered why Jesus needed to asked to turn the water into wine at the wedding at Canaan – why didn’t he just do it.

[quote=kitkatty]Seriously, if you think about Our Lord probably had the perfect well rounded personality, after all are we not called to imitate His perfection the best we can?

Awake in reply- It just doesn’t strike me that way. Especially in the gospel of John. If he wasn’t God, I might even say that he seems arrogant at times
[/quote]

Again I agree.

I sometimes think I would have to be more judgmental not less if I followed some of Jesus actions.

Don’t tell a child I understand them feeling jealous when a sibling gets something they want or when they do not get the praise another child gets for the same action.


#16

I have to disagree very much with this. Jesus only condemned the Pharisees and Sadducees who tried to trap him in trick questions, who were hateful and prideful in their hearts while condemning of others for minor rule violations, and who condemned Him and His teachings. It is entirely untrue that the gospels shows Jesus going up to sincere and humble Pharisees who were just following their religious rules in the way they best knew how and condemning them.

The older brother was not just doing the best that he could, he was unloving to his younger brother. How is he without blame? There is no indication he doesn’t eventually forgive and be reconciled with his family, either.

As for the wedding at Cana, he never refused! His mother asked Him, and he seemed to think it was really unnecessary for the revelers to have any more wine. But he didn’t hesitate to fulfill her request. She doesn’t plead or beg, she simply knows He will do whatever she asks.


#17

[quote=Angels Unaware]The older brother was not just doing the best that he could, he was unloving to his younger brother. How is he without blame? There is no indication he doesn’t eventually forgive and be reconciled with his family, either.
[/quote]

And maybe he finally got the goat to have a feast with his friends.

And if so how sad he couldn’t have got it without having to be unloving.


#18

Salonika, I feel a lot of what you said. I’ve really tried to feel better about Jesus than I do. I pray and repent and nothing happens. I realize “ask and you will receive” is a metaphor, but it’s still frustrating.


#19

The thing is, Jesus is presented to us as being meek and mild. He did teach and do many things that were loving. I’m sure you all can think of some cases.

But yet the same Jesus instructed people to hate their father, mother, wife, and children. He told those who wanted to follow him, but first wanted say goodbye to their loved ones, that they weren’t fit for the kingdom of God. He taught not to give what is holy to the dogs (a very derogatory term referring to the gentiles).

He may have had a point he was making, but he just doesn’t come off as being particularly compassionate, or somebody I’d want to spend a lot of time with.


#20

True. If he is actually God, then of course I couldn’t call him arrogant. But if I met somebody else who acted and said things in the matter that Jesus did, I might.


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