Jewish-Catholic Dialogue: Not an invitation to baptism

rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2009/10/jewiush-catholic-dialogue-not.html

Jewish-Catholic Dialogue: Not an invitation to baptism
On June 18, 2009, the Committee on Doctrine and the Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the USCCB issued the “Note on Ambiguities Contained in Reflections on Covenant and Mission” (please see the Rorate post on this document.)

Now a clarification on the clarification has been issued. On October 5, 2009, the USCCB issued a “Statement of Principles” affirming, among other things, that "Jewish-Catholic dialogue, one of the blessed fruits of the Second Vatican Council, has never been and will never be used by the Catholic Church as a means of proselytism – nor is it intended as a disguised invitation to baptism.” (Statement of Principles #3, emphasis mine). The statement of principles accompanied a letter from Francis Cardinal George and four other prelates responding to a letter from several rabbis attacking the June 18 “Note”. In their letter, in addition to affirming that they expect to encounter Jews “faithful to the Mosaic covenant” in Jewish-Christian dialogue, the bishops also stated that the following passage will be removed from the “Note on Ambiguities”:

"For example, Reflections on Covenant and Mission proposes interreligious dialogue as a form of evangelization that is 'a mutually enriching sharing of gifts devoid of any intention whatsoever to invite the dialogue partner to baptism.' Though Christian participation in interreligious dialogue would not normally include an explicit invitation to baptism and entrance into the Church, the Christian dialogue partner is always giving witness to the following of Christ, to which all are implicitly invited."

The final sentence had been the particular object of ire of certain rabbis, who considered it an invitation to “apostasy.”

http://ncronline.org/news/bishops-revise-commentary-catholic-jewish-dialogue

ncronline.org/print/15217

Bishops revise commentary on Catholic-Jewish dialogue
Article Details
Offending sentence cut from bishops’ note on dialogue

WASHINGTON – Five key officials of the U.S. Conference of Catholics Bishops have excised a controversial passage from a public note on Catholic-Jewish dialogue issued in June by two USCCB committees.

U.S. Jewish leaders had found the passage offensive and said faithful Jews could not enter into dialogue with Catholics if those Catholics were always at least implicitly seeking their conversion.

The church officials, who included Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, USCCB president, also issued a six-point “Statement of Principles for Catholic-Jewish Dialogue” that clearly affirms that God’s covenant with the Jews has never been revoked.

“Jewish covenantal life endures till the present day as a vital witness to God’s saving will for his people Israel and for all of humanity,” it says.

The six-point statement and an accompanying letter to heads of five leading U.S. Jewish organizations were dated Oct. 2 and released by the USCCB Oct. 6

Signing the letter and statement, in addition to Cardinal George, were Cardinal William H. Keeler, retired archbishop of Baltimore, USCCB episcopal moderator of Catholic-Jewish relations; Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta, chairman of the USCCB Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs; Bishop William E. Lori of Bridgeport, Conn., chairman of the USCCB Committee on Doctrine, and Bishop William Murphy of Rockville Centre, N.Y., Catholic co-chair of the USCCB consultation with the Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America.

The original note in question had been issued jointly by the USCCB doctrinal and ecumenical committees.

The most controversial passage in the note had said, “Though Christian participation in interreligious dialogue would not normally include an explicit invitation to baptism and entrance into the church, the Christian dialogue partner is always giving witness to the following of Christ, to which all are implicitly invited.”

That sentence and the immediately previous sentence, leading in to it, will be deleted from the note, the bishops said.

When the note was released, it immediately provoked criticism from several leading scholars in Catholic-Jewish dialogue.

Philip A. Cunningham, director of the Institute for Catholic-Jewish Relations at St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, told NCR at the time that the statement about implicitly inviting dialogue partners to enter the church reopened “a can of worms … a Pandora’s box that most of us who have been involved in dialogical work had thought had been resolved a long time ago.”

In August, in a rare joint letter, five of the leading U.S. Jewish organizations protested that the note “is antithetical to the very essence of Jewish-Christian dialogue as we have understood it in the post-Vatican II era.”

They said even an implicit invitation to enter the church in the context of interreligious dialogue amounts to inviting the Jewish participants to apostasize. Further, the language saying that “interreligious dialogue would not normally include an explicit invitation to baptism” implies that in some situations it could include such an explicit invitation, they said.

The Jewish organizations expressing concern were the Rabbinical Council of America, American Jewish Committee, Orthodox Union, Anti-Defamation League and National Council of Synagogues.

The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council America, the respective synagogal and rabbinical organizations of Orthodox Judaism, have an ongoing joint consultation with the USCCB.

The National Council of Synagogues, representing the synagogal and rabbinical organizations of Conservative and Reform Judaism, has a separate ongoing consultation with the USCCB.

While the AJC and ADL are not in formal consultation with the bishops, both are important voices in the Jewish community and longtime advocates of improved Catholic-Jewish relations.

In their letter to the heads of those organizations, Cardinal George and his fellow USCCB officials said their new six-point statement on dialogue and the amendment to the original note “make clear our intentions and hopes for future dialogue between committed Catholics and committed Jews.”

In the six points they reaffirmed Catholic belief that “Jesus Christ is the unique savior of all humankind” and that Catholics must “bear witness to Christ at every moment of their lives.”

But they added that “lived context shapes the form of that witness to the Lord we love. Jewish-Catholic dialogue, one of the blessed fruits of the Second Vatican Council, has never been and will never be used by the Catholic Church as a means of proselytism – nor is it intended as a disguised invitation to baptism.”

“In sitting at the table,” they said, “we expect to encounter Jews who are faithful to the Mosaic covenant, just as we insist that only Catholics committed to the teachings of the church encounter them in our dialogues.”

The six point statement can be found at www.usccb.org/seia/StatementofPrinciples.pdf [2]

The bishops’ letter can be found at www.usccb.org/seia/ResponsetoRabbis.pdf [3]

So I take it the Bishops do not think we as Catholics should in any way work for the conversion of the Jews? We apparently cannot even implicitly invite them to Christ.

Assuming Christ is necessary for salvation, and knowing the Jews reject Christ, is this not basically saying Catholics should abandon the Jews to their faithlessness and the inevitable result?

Or do these Bishops believe the Jews have just as good a chance of being saved without Christ and His Church? If so, I’m pretty sure this is heresy and guts the purpose of Christ’s founding a Church.

And if the point of inter-religious dialogue is not the eventual conversion of those we dialogue with, what is the point?

This, sadly, does not surprise me. It seems like many Roman Catholic hierarchs are going to such lengths as to not offend anyone. It’s a complete 180 from where the Latin Church was a century ago. Before you had bishops saying Jews and Protestants had to be converted to Catholicism, and now you have certain Catholic authors, such as Peter Kreeft saying Lutheran theology is a legitimate Christian expression.

I’m very sorry to hear this happening in the Latin Church. :frowning:

In Christ,
Andrew

What?! This is ridiculous. Christ came for ALL people, including the Jews. Ugh. The Latin church is so incredibly disappointing sometimes. :frowning:

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