Jewish dietary restriction on cream?

I have a stupid question about a movie I was watching last night.

The movie was set in nazi Germany. There was a scene where Jew (hiding in plain site as a gentile)( had to eat with an SS officer, and the movie made it seem like the Jew had to eat a bite of cream on her pastry to keep up her act.

I’m moderately familiar with the Kosher restrictions, but is there a restriction on cream? Or is cream one of the food products required to be made by Kosher laws?? Or, was I just reading something into the movie???

It might depend on how the pastry was made, since you can’t mix dairy and meat if the pasty had involved use of any animal fats that might mean it was non-kosher.

There is also the factor of whether the cream used was Chalav Y’Israel (the milk used was sourced from an observant Jewish dairy farmer) or not.

As I recall, some particularly-strict advisory councils won’t even grant a hechsher (seal of approval for kashruth adherence) to a dairy product unless it is Chalav Y’Israel. There is also a mitzvah attached to only consuming Chalav Y’Israel products (supporting one’s fellow Jew and whatnot), so that is something to consider as well.

Okay, so other than the Kosher laws, there is nothing prohibiting Jews from eating cream. It might just have been something I was reading into the videography of the movie,

Thanks for the replies!

As Christians might put it, where angels fear to tread. :slight_smile:

youtube.com/watch?v=Y9e-nnLzUE4

I might have worked in ‘Angel Delight’ but it would probably be a bit rich for Irish tastes. :wink:

I’m quite fond of the butterscotch flavour of that stuff although I can’t stand any of the others at at all.

It might depend on how the pastry was made, since you can’t mix dairy and meat if the pasty had involved use of any animal fats that might mean it was non-kosher.

Without knowing all the details of the movie, this note above would be the likely correct answer. The prohibition against mixing meat and milk products (such as cream, etc.) is derived from a few verses in the Torah, namely Exodus 23:19 and 34:26:

“The choicest first-fruits of thy land thou shalt bring into the house of the LORD thy God. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother’s milk.”

and Deut. 14:21:

“Ye shall not eat of any thing that dieth of itself; thou mayest give it unto the stranger that is within thy gates, that he may eat it; or thou mayest sell it unto a foreigner; for thou art a holy people unto the LORD thy God. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother’s milk.”

The traditional interpretation of boiling a kid in its mother’s milk is derived to mean that one should not eat milk and meat at the same meal. The strict time frame between non-consumption of meat and milk is considered to be 6 hours, which comes from a teaching by Maimonides.

Nazis would not have followed these dietary restrictions, much less know their intricate details. By contrast, an Orthodox Jew would follow these dietary regulations.

The thing is that it had dramatic effect but the circumstances were such that the whole meal would have been non-Kosher - given all the rules and regulations about various foods, food additives, how they are prepared and stored, the treatment of utensils and so on.

So, it’s not just a question of mixing meat and dairy.

As to cream, well had the cow been certified as having lungs free from scabs and lesions? Was any gelatin used in the making of the cream certified Kosher?

You get the picture . . . .

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