Jewish explanation of temple veil torn?


#1

Please move this if it would be more suitable in another discussion forum.

How do Jewish people explain the veil of the temple having been torn on Good Friday?


#2

I’ll mention a few points about this event although I am reluctant to get into a protracted discussion and debate. First, there is no explicit mention of this occurrence in the Talmud, contrary to popular belief. Second, the accompanying earthquake and rising of the dead that supposedly took place are also undocumented by eyewitnesses and Hebrew writings. Third, the functioning of the Temple still continued as usual after this happening until 70 AD, when it was destroyed. Fourth, St. Jerome wrote about the torn veil of the Temple but only a few hundred years after it happened. That’s enough for now.


#3

The Jewish Annotated New Testament might be of some help if you can access a copy.

Thanks for the information.


#4

I have heard that the Talmud does say that for forty years, before the destruction of the Temple, the crimson thread remained crimson, the western light went out, the lot for the Lord always came up in the left hand and the Temple gates, that were closed at night, were found opened in the morning. Is this correct?


#5

[quote="JM3, post:4, topic:311403"]
I have heard that the Talmud does say that for forty years, before the destruction of the Temple, the crimson thread remained crimson, the western light went out, the lot for the Lord always came up in the left hand and the Temple gates, that were closed at night, were found opened in the morning. Is this correct?

[/quote]

All of these events in the Talmud did occur but they are attributed not to the appearance of the Mashiach but to the gradual decline in the moral behavior of the Jewish people that began centuries earlier and accelerated with the death of the High Priest Shimon HaTzaddik. The Talmud makes that clear. These occurrences were not meant as a sign that animal blood sacrifices would no longer be necessary for atonement, as Ezekiel relates these practices would actually be restored with the coming of the Messiah. In any case, Isaiah points to the fact that animal sacrifices are not a means of atonement for a people who have become wayward (and they were never regarded as the principal means of atonement in the first place), but rather acts of loving-kindness are the surest route to redemption.


#6

I would guess that the most likely answer is that modern day Jews don't believe that it happened. If you are a believing Jew today, you would not accept the Gospel accounts.

(No disrespect to Jews or Christians intended, but we do have different beliefs.)


#7

Thank you for your answer. One more question, if I may.

Was High Priest Shimon Ha Tzaddik the High Priest for forty years when the crimson thread turned white and is there a jewish commentary that discusses a correlation between the two? (ok, two questions disguised as one. :stuck_out_tongue: )


#8

[quote="PaulfromIowa, post:6, topic:311403"]
I would guess that the most likely answer is that modern day Jews don't believe that it happened. If you are a believing Jew today, you would not accept the Gospel accounts.

(No disrespect to Jews or Christians intended, but we do have different beliefs.)

[/quote]

It hasn't been established that Jews at any time believed it happened.


#9

Thank you for the information.

Please pardon me if I am misunderstanding this, but the earthquake that occurred and disrupted the structure of the temple, did this happen on Good Friday?

And if the earthquake did happen at the time of the death of Jesus, would that not be significant to any Jewish observers?


#10

Already answered in post #2


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