Jews and sacrifice


#1

So, my priest is giving a lecture series on the euchrist, and so i am chattering in the back with another person about the foreshadoing of the OT sacrifices to Christ. and so Fr gets to the Q&A portion, and asks us what we are talkig about in the back. and so i ask, “If the jews were forbidden to consume the blood of the sacrifice because blood was the life and belonged to God, why are we given the blood of Christ if he is the sacrifice?” so he says he’ll look it up, and so playfully, he has given me some homework as well: What are they (jews) doing instead of sacrifices?

I know they do not have a temple to sacrifice in because it was destroyed and that when ever they try to rebuild, somthing interferes (especially now that there is a mosque on the mount), and besides as their priesthood is passed on by laying on of hands, they have no temple priests to sacrifice stuff. but what do they do instead??


#2

Hi Brain!

I don’t care for the mistranslation “sacrifice” for the Hebrew word korban, which actually is a cognate of a root meaning “to approach” or “to draw near/close to”) Because there is no Temple (and for other reasons as well), the order of offerings (as well as other Torah precepts which are dependent on the Temple & a fully functioning Aaronic priesthood, such as accepting tithes, administering the bitter waters to a suspected adultress, 7th and Jubilee years, etc. etc.) are also temporarily suspended :crying: .

The order of offerings on a regular basis ceased in CE 70, when the Romans destroyed the Second Temple. It was briefly reinstituted during the Bar Kokhba revolt against Rome (in CE 132-135, see us-israel.org/jsource/biography/Kokhba.html ). There are vague hints that it may have been reinstituted for an even shorter period during the brief reign of the Roman Emperor Julian (“the Apostate”) in CE 361-363 (see jewishencyclopedia.com/v…J&search=Julian). It probably was reinstituted for a short time after CE 614, when the Sassanid Persians captured Jerusalem from the Byzantines & turned the city over to us. But this interlude came to an end when the Byzantines retook the city a few years later. Since then, nada. :crying:

The order of Temple offerings was merely one part of the process whereby a Jew could repent of his/her sins; by itself, isolated, bringing an offering was insufficient. Since the order of offerings is, as I’ve said, temporarily suspended, we must rely, for the time being, on the other steps of the process.

What are the other steps of the process? Hosea 14:2-3 (read in synagogue on the Sabbath between Rosh Hashannah jewfaq.org/holiday2.htm and Yom Kippur jewfaq.org/holiday4.htm) says:

Return, O Israel, unto the Lord your God; for you have stumbled in your iniquity. Take with you words, and return unto the Lord; say unto Him: 'Forgive all iniquity, and accept that which is good; so will we render for bullocks the offering of our lips.

From this & other verses, we learn that the repentant sinner must understand, confess & acknowledge his sin (before God), promise not to do it again & then actually not do it again. This is basically it. A korban that was unaccompanied by a contrite heart, sincere confession, etc. was less than useless. Rabbi Avraham Yitzhak Hacohen Kook (us-israel.org/jsource/biography/Rav_Kook.html) taught that, “The most significant part of the sacrifice was never meant to be the savoury smell of the burning meat, but the trembling sincerity of the human heart.”

There were other kinds of offerings, other than those of a penitent/repentant sinner. See jewfaq.org/qorbanot.htm for a very good read on the whole issue of korbanot.

If you have any more questions, ask away & I’ll do my best.

Be well!

ssv :wave:


#3

Still,
I regret I didn’t get to contact you in Israel. I got sicker then a dog for about 3 days. So I just sort of took it easy and didn’t feel like doing much. However, I had a great time and everyone treated me very well. I enjoyed it immensely. Shalom


#4

Hi Father!

Still, I regret I didn’t get to contact you in Israel. I got sicker then a dog for about 3 days. So I just sort of took it easy and didn’t feel like doing much. However, I had a great time and everyone treated me very well. I enjoyed it immensely. Shalom

No prob’! We’re :cool: .

“God’s brass knuckles”…I like it. All the better to fight evil with!

Be well!

ssv :wave:


#5

bump


#6

Dear stillsmallvoice,

Thank you, thank you for your scholarship and for
your gracious sharing of same,
reen12


#7

Hi reen12!

Thank you! (BLUSHBLUSHBLUSH)

Be well!

ssv :wave:


#8

This is off of the thread subject but I’ll ask anyway. Did the ancient Jews believe in creation ex nihilo (out of nothing), or creation ex materia (out of matter that already existed)? What references can you point me to that tells us the answer?

Thank you.


#9

Tmaque will begin a new thread dealing with the new question. Otherwise this thread is closed.

God Bless


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.