Jobs that serve the Catholic Chirch


#1

Hi, I'm new to the forums and just looking for guidance as I grow in my Catholic faith. I'm getting close to the time in my life where I should be looking at jobs/careers, but I've honestly been pushing it off out of fear. With the new year here, I've decided I need to start exploring possible career paths.

As I analyzed my options, I immediately knew I wanted a job somehow connected to the Catholic Church. I definitely don't want to be a priest, deacon, or anything along those lines to be honest. My sister said there were plenty of "behind-the-scenes" jobs like canon law and so on. I feel something along these lines would really interest me.

I'm just asking for some interesting jobs that serve the Catholic Church directly. I realize being a doctor and lawyer could potentially be honorable professions serving the Lord, but I would like to explore possibilities DIRECTLY involved with the Church.

Thank you in advance, and God bless :)


#2

Nursing has always been a job in which the Catholic Church serves. Many religious and laypeople have served the Church in a nursing capacity. Why is medicine and law not an option? They directly serve the Church too.

And really, any employment can serve the Church.....


#3

A friend of mine is a public policy analyst for the church. Any institution of that size has a multitude of behind the scenes work. Check with your Catholic Social Services and your diocese, as quick places to start.


#4

Teaching and healthcare are two major fields to explore.


#5

It takes many different types to run a parish or diocese. Civil lawyers work full time for a diocese as do accountants, development people, communications, IT, business managers, social workers. Many hospitals are run by the Church. There is always teaching professions. Many jobs you can do on the outside you can do for the Church.


#6

Check out the website of your Diocese and see if they offer any careers. I know my Diocese offers some.


#7

Catholic lay minister, either at a college or church, and Catholic relief services are some other options.


#8

tachers, catechists, accoutants, office managers…etc too


#9

I'm studying Social Work and want to work for a Catholic charity or organization where I can help people.


#10

I was just wondering... what is involved in becoming a Cannon Lawyer? How much education do you need, and in what ways can you serve the church? Could you do it in the United States or would you need to work at the Vatican?


#11

All dioceses have canon lawyers working for them. In addition to an undergraduate degree, you’ll need a graduate degree, preferably in theology, and you’ll need a good command of written Latin. I think the canon law degree is another 3+ years beyond the graduate degree. Most canon lawyers are priests as well, ones that have earned a licentiate (J.C.L.) degree or doctoral degree (J.C.D.), so that limits the number of openings available to laity.

If that sounds overwhelming, just know that the Church everywhere hires about every job description imaginable - including CPAs, architects, property managers, etc.


#12

Jobs on the parish level are a bit more limited. They need a maintenance worker, a receptionist and or secretary, business manager, director of religious education and perhaps an outreach director or music director. Bigger parishes may have more need for additional bookkeeper, more maintenance or administrative workers. A lot depends on how big and how much money a parish has.

On the diocesan level there is a lot more types of positions available. Financial, law, directors of different offices, human resources, communications, social work, almost any position any big business might have.

Canon law is a specialized field and I believe only Catholic Univ. in DC grants a degree in that here in the US.

Other more direct areas such as catechetical leader you probably need an MA in theology or religious studies, but there are poorer parishes who might hire someone without a degree. In our area you have to have one or be working toward the degree to get a position as a DRE.

Look to see if your diocese has a lay formation program that prepares people for ministry. It’s no guarantee for a job but you at least get some good formation that will help in your search.


#13

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