John 15: 1-8


#1

I was just curious… why was the Gospel for the 5th Sunday of Easter (JN 15:1-8) was also used for today’s Gospel reading (Wednesday of the Fifth Week of Easter)?


#2

=KD8TZC;12953356]I was just curious… why was the Gospel for the 5th Sunday of Easter (JN 15:1-8) was also used for today’s Gospel reading (Wednesday of the Fifth Week of Easter)?

I’m adding you to my daily prayer list:)

PRAY MUCH!

As to the reading

I can see the tie-in with the Resurrection and the “vine” being closely related. It explains how the Resurrection can be conditionally possible for us

As to why it is repeated, there are many lessons to be learned from these passages. Why we need Christ in our lives, the need to be an Informed, fully Practicing Catholic, that our actions DO have consequences are just some of the Lessons to be taught and learned from these passages.

May God Bless you; the Holy Spirit guide you and our Blessed Mother intercede for you

Seek a Peaceful resolution to your inner conflict

Patrick

Patrick


#3

This does happen from time to time throughout the year, remember that we have the 3 cycles of readings for Sundays, A, B and C. So this only occurs once every three years for this particular reading.

There are certain texts that the compilers of the Lectionary seem to think are important during certain seasons such as Easter, this seems to be one of them.


#4

If you wish, take a look and compare these two lists:
Index to readings for Sundays and Major Feasts
and
Index to readings for Weekdays
I am curious but didn’t want to spend all day on it, so I looked for identical readings only within the Gospel of John. Of those, most pairs do indeed occur within the same week. A few pairs are not even close, occurring in different liturgical seasons.

John 1:1-18
Christmas Mass during the day, Years A, B, and C
7th Day of Christmas Octave (Dec. 31), Years 1 and 2

John 1:29-34
2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B (mid-January)
Jan. 3, Christmas Weekday, Years 1 and 2

John 1:29-34
2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A (mid-January)
Jan. 4, Christmas Weekday, Years 1 and 2

John 2:1-11
2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C (mid-January)
Jan. 7 (if Epiphany is Jan. 8), Years 1 and 2

John 6:1-15
17th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B (around late July)
Easter, Week 2, Friday, Years 1 and 2

John 6:60-69
21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B (around late August)
Easter, Week 3, Saturday, Years 1 and 2

John 8:1-11
5th Sunday of Lent, Year C
Lent, Week 5, Monday, Years 1 and 2

John 10:1-10
4th Sunday of Easter, Year A
Easter, Week 4, Monday (except Year A), Years 1 and 2

John 10:11-18
4th Sunday of Easter, Year B
Easter, Week 4, Monday (Year A)

John 15:1-8
5th Sunday of Easter, Year B
Easter, Week 5, Wednesday, Years 1 and 2

John 16:12-15
Sunday after Pentecost: Holy Trinity, Year C
Easter, Week 6, Wednesday, Years 1 and 2

There are other pairs of reading that overlap (having some verses in common). I did not count those.


#5

It happens often…there is a reading from Mark 16 on the great commissioning a week from Sunday and it was a weekday reading just a few days back… I think it has to do with the daily mass readings being on a two year cycle and Sunday readings on a 3 year, so occasionally there is overlap.


#6

It does happen on occasion that readings used on Sunday are repeated during the week that follows. In fact, some years readings would repeat on Monday after being used on Sunday–in those cases, the Lectionary has an alternative reading to use.

The reason is that, typically, the Gospels on Sundays are semi-continuous in one book (During Easter, from the Gospel according to John), while the weekday Gospels are also semi-continuous (during Easter, also from the Gospel according to John). Usually the Sunday readings are the “more important” texts or ideas–and it would be odd to leave them out when in that section for the weekday texts.

But the readings as a whole are not identical. For example, Sunday of the Fifth Week of Easter (Year B) also had readings from Acts 9 and First John 3, and the Responsorial Psalm was from Psalm 22 besides the Gospel. Wednesday of the Fifth Week of Easter had a reading from Acts 15, followed by a Responsorial from Psalm 122. Taken together, these may well give a different flavor to the Gospel and its message. Sunday has examples of remaining on the vine: 1 John 3 speaks of loving in deed and truth, not just in word. Acts 9 has Barnabas doing just that for Paul, introducing him to the Jerusalem community. And today, Wednesday, Acts 15 shows a different way–when the dispute between the “Judaizers” (to use Paul’s term from Galatians) and Barnabas and Paul gets heated, they appeal to the Mother Church in Jerusalem for a judgment–so they remain “on the vine” as part of the universal Church.

This is one example of how different interpretations of one text may be suggested by the different contexts we read them in.


#7

Thanks all… that’s sort of what I figured, but it just seemed strange that it repeated so quickly.

I wonder how many priests used the same homily that they did on Sunday.


#8

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