Joining a monastery


#1

What are the requirements to become a monk in Catholicism


#2

To have a vocation to that life from God, confirmed by the community through the Abbot.

If you mean what are the requirements of the life, that depends on the rule. Most Catholic monks follow the Rule of St. Benedict, which you can read online to find out more.

Catholic monasteries welcome visitors to come there for a time of spiritual recollection, if you are interested in learning more about their life I recommend paying a visit to one in your area for a day or two, and try to pray with the monks in the church as often as possible.


#3

You have to start by having the basic requirements for religious life. To be single,with no dependents on you, either for money or physical or psychological support. To be Catholic, baptized, confirmed and converted for about two years (I never have gotten a firm answer on this). No police record, at least no felonies. You need recommendations by your parish priest who knows you well, your spiritual director if you have one, a medical clearance with up to date dental records and treatments and vaccinations, and often a psychological evaluation which you have to pay for yourself. Several visits to the monastery with at least a weekend or live-in, and evaluations by those in charge of formation.


#4

[quote="TuAutem, post:2, topic:247111"]
To have a vocation to that life from God, confirmed by the community through the Abbot.

If you mean what are the requirements of the life, that depends on the rule. Most Catholic monks follow the Rule of St. Benedict, which you can read online to find out more.

Catholic monasteries welcome visitors to come there for a time of spiritual recollection, if you are interested in learning more about their life I recommend paying a visit to one in your area for a day or two, and try to pray with the monks in the church as often as possible.

[/quote]

Technically all monks follow the Rule of St Benedict. This was something that Charlemagne did as Holy Roman Emperor.

Those who live a monastic lifestyle but do not follow the Rule of St Benedict are called other things like friars, hermits, or canons.

Each monastery will have its own guidelines for entry. If they have a website some of them may be listed there. You could also contact the vocations director of the monastery for more information.


#5

[quote="ByzCath, post:4, topic:247111"]
Technically all monks follow the Rule of St Benedict.

[/quote]

Don't forget the Carthusians! Also some Camaldolese live as hermits within a community (although those who are not hermits do follow the rule of St. Benedict, as I understand.) And I'm sure there are Eastern Catholic Basilian monks.

I will grant, though, that while all of the above are monks who don't follow the rule of St. Benedict, strictly speaking none of them follow any other rule, since the Carthusians have constitutions, and the hermits and Basilians are also following a tradition, rather than a rule strictly speaking.


#6

The Brigittine Monks use the Rule of Saint Augustine, or would that technically make them Canons?


#7

[quote="TuAutem, post:5, topic:247111"]
Don't forget the Carthusians! Also some Camaldolese live as hermits within a community (although those who are not hermits do follow the rule of St. Benedict, as I understand.)

[/quote]

Though they may have some community aspects both Carthusians and Camaldolese are hermits.

And I'm sure there are Eastern Catholic Basilian monks.

Charlemagne's ruling only affected the Western Church.

I will grant, though, that while all of the above are monks who don't follow the rule of St. Benedict, strictly speaking none of them follow any other rule, since the Carthusians have constitutions, and the hermits and Basilians are also following a tradition, rather than a rule strictly speaking.


closed #8

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