Joshua the movie also how should a Catholic act towards non-Catholic groups.

I have always had a little problem with accepting other religious beliefs. Today I was watching the TBN (Trinity Broadcasting Network), and there was a show called “Joshua”. Here is the link to the movie…

joshuathemovie.com/

Now i found the movie kinda Anti-Catholic, just a little bit. The about A man that arrives in a small town. At first, no one knows his name; no one knows where he came from. He’s strong. He’s smart. He’s “easy on the eyes.” The locals want to call him a stranger, but when they meet him, he makes them feel quite the opposite - like they’ve known him their whole lives. Joshua is seemingly everywhere at once, making the kind of impression that few have ever felt. But it is exactly this influence that creates a division between the stubbornly orthodox Father Tardone and the well-meaning but less-than-confident Father Pat, two priests who believe very strongly in the same thing, but in very different ways. When the reluctant priest finally recognizes the way, finally says the word through a whisper and a tear, it comes with a force of a revelation.

1.) Would’ve you watched this movie, I just saw a priest and got kinda happy. But I was disappointed.

2.) Now in the movie, a Baptist church was damaged and Joshua pulls the town together to rebuild the church, even a local priest. Now my question is, us as Catholics, would it have been acceptable to assist the Baptist rebuild their church. If it were me as of right now, I wouldn’t have helped them, but what would be the “right” thing to do.

Thanks to all.

[quote=RomanRyan1088]I have always had a little problem with accepting other religious beliefs. Today I was watching the TBN (Trinity Broadcasting Network), and there was a show called “Joshua”. Here is the link to the movie…

joshuathemovie.com/

Now i found the movie kinda Anti-Catholic, just a little bit. The about A man that arrives in a small town. At first, no one knows his name; no one knows where he came from. He’s strong. He’s smart. He’s “easy on the eyes.” The locals want to call him a stranger, but when they meet him, he makes them feel quite the opposite - like they’ve known him their whole lives. Joshua is seemingly everywhere at once, making the kind of impression that few have ever felt. But it is exactly this influence that creates a division between the stubbornly orthodox Father Tardone and the well-meaning but less-than-confident Father Pat, two priests who believe very strongly in the same thing, but in very different ways. When the reluctant priest finally recognizes the way, finally says the word through a whisper and a tear, it comes with a force of a revelation.

1.) Would’ve you watched this movie, I just saw a priest and got kinda happy. But I was disappointed.

2.) Now in the movie, a Baptist church was damaged and Joshua pulls the town together to rebuild the church, even a local priest. Now my question is, us as Catholics, would it have been acceptable to assist the Baptist rebuild their church. If it were me as of right now, I wouldn’t have helped them, but what would be the “right” thing to do.

Thanks to all.
[/quote]

And Jesus asks “who is your nieghbor?”

I have not seen the movie but heard it from a co worker. The way he explained it came across to me to be anti catholic in a very subtle way. I personally don’t care to watch the movie. I don’t know why but as he was telling me about the movie it somehow made me think of St Francis of Assisi. What really got me was the tone he had when he was telling me about Joshua going to see the Pope. It sounded negative to me and made want to question why would a protestant want to go to see the Pope for some kind of confirmation. Like I said I have not seen the movie. I am just going with what my co worker said about the movie. At this time I have no desire to watch the movie unless of course there is just absolutely nothing good on tv to watch.

God Bless

embertx

While evangelicals tend to like Joshua, the novel was written by a Catholic priest. Hence the obsession with Catholicism. I haven’t seen the movie, but I found the novel to be full of cliches and very facile in its thinking–in a way I generally associate with “liberal” Catholics. So that’s the pigeon-hole I’d tend to put it in. The most ridiculous caricature, actually, is of the Episcopal priest. I can’t believe that Fr. Girzone has actually known many Episcopal priests, since few if any of them are anything like the character he creates.

In Christ,

Edwin

[quote=RomanRyan1088] in the movie, a Baptist church was damaged and Joshua pulls the town together to rebuild the church, even a local priest. Now my question is, us as Catholics, would it have been acceptable to assist the Baptist rebuild their church. If it were me as of right now, I wouldn’t have helped them, but what would be the “right” thing to do.
[/quote]

Ryan,

I have to admit that it concerns me greatly that a young Catholic in this day and age would ask this question or even have a doubt in his or her mind as to the answer to it.

The following is an excerpt from a web report about a fire that destroyed Christ the Saviour Melkite Greek-Catholic Church in Yonker, NY a few years ago:

thanks to the hospitality of Fr. Miroslav Trojanowski and the parishioners at St. Michael’s Ukrainian Catholic Church a few blocks away. They provided me with their second priest’s apartment (currently vacant) and have opened the church and all it contains to us. …

In the meantime we are grateful for the calls, gifts and expressions of concern which came from our own clergy as well as nearby clergy and friends of our community. The Antiochian Orthodox church offered the use of its facilities, the Carpatho-Russian Orthodox church, the nearby Capuchin monastery and an area Presbyterian church also extended offers of assistance.

If you were to research the aftermath of the gas explosion that leveled St. Mary’s Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church in Colchester, CT, a few months ago, you would learn that fund-raising events to assist that small parish (only 55 families) to rebuild were held by churches in the town (and surrounding communities) of virtually every denomination.

These stories and identical responses to such happenings are played out every week across the US. And with good reason.

Priests of the Maronite Catholic Church bow to the altar and recite a final prayer at the conclusion of the Service of the Holy Mysteries; a virtually identical prayer is recited by priests of the Syriac Catholic and Orthodox Churches at the conclusion of the Holy Qurbano. The prayer acknowledges the holy part played in God’s worship by the altar on which the liturgical service occurs and recognizes the temporality of both the priest and the altar.

Remain in peace, Holy Table of the Lord; I pray that I may return to you in peace. May the Sacrifice which I have been blessed to offer upon you forgive my sins, help me to avoid faults and prepare me to stand blameless before the Throne of Christ. I know not whether I shall ever again be blessed to return to you and again offer this Holy Sacrifice upon you. Remain in peace, Holy Table of the Lord.

Consider for a moment that, for every person, of no matter what faith, their house of worship, be it church, synagogue, temple, or mosque evokes a deep, spiritual pull on them that is much like that evoked by a family member or the dearest of friends. Watch the news the next time that a house of worship is destroyed by fire or otherwise and listen as members of the congregation are interviewed. Hear the sobs in their voices and see their tears flow. And consider, in charity, what the answer should be to your question.

Many years,

Neil

You know I disagree with alot of the health, wealth and prosperity doctrine they preach on tbn. That being said my hat is off to them,because the have now added ArchBishop Fulton J.Sheen to their line up.So we might want to keep those Churches open:) :blessyou:

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