Judge orders homeschoolers into public school

wral.com/news/local/story/4727161/

“Her lessons also have a religious slant, which the judge said was the root of the problem.”

Meanwhile public school budgets are being slashed, teachers are getting laid off, class size is growing, and many schools are unsafe. :rolleyes:

It seems to me, the problem is that the parents are in conflict over how to educate their children. If both parents agreed to homeschool, there wouldn’t be a problem.

If both parents have parental rights in the divorce, and they can’t agree, then they turn it over to the court. Neither parent should have a veto over the other.

Yeah, the headline sounds suspect, but if you read the whole article you get the feeling that the mom pulled the kids out of public school after the divorce against the will of the dad. Also, the “Sound Doctrine” church apparently recommends (read - “tells”) their parents to homeschool. I have a feeling that the religious slant that the particular curriculum has is part of why dad is objecting.

It’s sad, but this is how it goes with divorce.

Regrettably, it sounds like Mom and Dad are using the kids for a game of tug-o-war. Sad. But often, in a divorce, the kids don’t count in the middle of the lawyering. The judge will need the wisdom of Solomon for this one.

There may also be the issue that Mom wants to indoctrinate the kids in a sect against Dad’s will.

When I stated previously that homeschooling was often parental selfishness, folks jumped all over me. Then situations like the above occur …

There are always people that would rather argue the exception than the rule.:shrug:

With all due respect, I worked in the court system for more than a decade with families in custody and other disputes. So, from what I have witnessed, I can assure you that my stated views on the impetus for homeschooling children was far from an exception.

I am not sure how much respect I am due, but working with families in dispute is hardly a place to form a well balanced opinion on homeschoolers.

The article states that all parties involved agree that the children are “thriving” in their homeschool environment. I would assume that means the father agrees that his kids aren’t being neglected with homeschooling. The conflict is the religious belief of the mother and curriculum. So, what’s that about that pesky separation thingy?? :slight_smile:

Barbarian observes:
It seems to me, the problem is that the parents are in conflict over how to educate their children. .

The article states that all parties involved agree that the children are “thriving” in their homeschool environment.

Given that the article takes one parent’s side against the other, I’m skeptical. And it’s irrelevant. Unless one parent has sole custody, he or she is not free to ignore the wishes of the other parent.

I would assume that means the father agrees that his kids aren’t being neglected with homeschooling. The conflict is the religious belief of the mother and curriculum.

Turns out momma isn’t the sole arbiter of her kids’ upbringing. Dad has rights too. Since they can’t agree, the court has to.

So, what’s that about that pesky separation thingy??

The old thing about your right to swing your arm ends where the next person’s nose begins. Religious freedom is not license to violate the rights of others.

Right - the court has to arbitrate this case, and the judge has explicitly stated that the children need to be exposed to ideas other than the Christian ideology they are currently being exposed to, regardless of the fact the children are doing much better than they would in a public school environment. How is that not a case of the judge infringing on the rights of the parent, regardless of which parent it is, and their free exercise of religious freedom?

Someone has to lose…it’s the nature of the beast. (Actually I think everyone in general loses in divorce).

My guess is that since the mom is homeschooling, then she must at least have primary physical custody of the children. That means the dad has little influence with his kids day to day. He objected to the way his kids were being educated. The judge could think that the only way to resolve the conflict is to order that the children go to a “religiously neutral” public school.

Now, I know everyone’s gonna holler, “Hey, Walden, don’t you know they brainwash kids into atheism and fornication in those public schools??” That’s where a careful parent’s moral influence comes in. If the mother is so concerned about what her kids are learning to homeschool them, then I’m sure she’ll be able to take the time to talk with her kids about what they’ve been learning at school and supplement that with sound moral teaching.

Beau,

With all due respect, you have no idea what you are talking about. Selfishness has nothing to do with it. My wife and I homeschooled our twin daughters all the way through high school and we gave up a lot to do it. My sister-in-law used to say that the only reason we home schooled was because we didn’t want to get up early and get them off to public school. Then she had to home school her own kids because of a particular reason and she realized how much work it takes.

I find it remarkable that you could look at this clear-cut example of judicial fascism and come away from it calling the mother selfish. What are you thinking?

Gary

Judicial fascism?? That doesn’t make sense. Is that code for “I don’t agree with the decision?” Don’t forget that the parents are the ones that thrust this matter upon the court. They are the ones that couldn’t agree.

This is a Humpty Dumpty case. Once the divorce was final, there is just no way that the pieces can ever be put back together again.

Not at all. The courts have no right to tell a parent that they cannot factor religion into their child’s education and upbringing. It is irrelevant who brought the issue before the court, the judge should have ruled that this decision was beyond the scope of his authority.

Gary

Not at all. The courts have no right to tell a parent that they cannot factor religion into their child’s education and upbringing. It is irrelevant who brought the issue before the court, the judge should have ruled that this decision was beyond the scope of his authority.

But it’s not. When there’s a divorce, and both parents have custodial rights, they have to agree on things like school and religious education. Or the courts have to settle it. That’s how it goes.

If both parents had been willing to sit down and work it out, this wouldn’t be happening. It seems like one parent is demanding to have total control.

No, the article doesn’t say when the move occurred, pre or post divorce. It says the kids have been home schooled for four years which makes me think it was pre divorce and the husband didn’t like the wife’s new place of worship. The fact that the kids are testing two grade levels above their own, in a state ranked 33rd academically, is significant.

I think it’s a matter of access. Dad feels he’s getting the short end of the visitation schedule, and mom is unwilling to b bend because she thinks her schedule has worked well so far. The end result, the kids go to a public school where they may or may not receive a comparable education. A three way loss.

Exactly.

Where the kids go to school is precisely the role of the court in divorce cases (along with others).

I mean, what else do you think the court is for except making decisions that the parents are incapable of making on their own?

If the parent without physical custody didn’t have recourse to the court system then their rights would be trampled upon. The mom can’t do whatever she likes.

I didn’t say the article DID say when the move happened. I had a feelin’! Just so you don’t think I’m making my feeling up.:smiley:

"My teaching is strictly out of the Bible, and it’s very clear. It is very evident so I just choose to follow the Bible,” Venessa Mills said.

In an affidavit filed Friday in the divorce case, Thomas Mills stated that he “objected to the children being removed from public school.” He said Venessa Mills decided to home school after getting involved with Sound Doctrine church “where all children are home schooled.”

To me, the bolded part suggests that the removal occurred after the divorce, or at least while they weren’t getting along.

Why can’t the dad just not want his kids homeschooled? Why does there have to be an ulterior motive like visitation. I’m not saying that there isn’t an ulterior motive, but he has as much of a right to decide where his kids go to school as the mom.

And I think this is irrelevant:

The fact that the kids are testing two grade levels above their own, in a state ranked 33rd academically, is significant.

What does it matter if they are doing good or bad? Does the dad get to be a parent only when the kids aren’t doing good?

(Personally, I hate that it had to come to this. You’re right…no winners here)

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