Jury sentences Hasan to death for '09 Fort Hood massacre


#1

USA Today:

Jury sentences Hasan to death for '09 Fort Hood massacre

FORT HOOD, Texas — Nidal Hasan, the Army psychiatrist convicted in the November 2009 shooting rampage that left 13 dead and 31 wounded, was sentenced to death Wednesday by a military jury.Prosecutors had sought the death penalty, saying Hasan’s murderous rampage at the sprawling military base here left tragic and devastating loss for victims and loved ones.

Hasan, 42, was convicted last week on 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 charges of attempted premeditated murder. He appeared expressionless upon hearing the verdict, which came less than two hours of deliberations.
The death sentence required a unanimous verdict by the jury of 13 military officers. At minimum, Hasan faced life imprisonment. Still, while Hasan could be the first serviceman executed by the military since 1961, the appellate process could take years.

Before an execution date is set, there will be automatic appeals at military courts for the Army and the armed forces, said Victor Hansen, a military law expert at the New England School of Law. Hasan could also ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review his case and file motions in federal court. Moreover, the president must eventually sign off on a military death sentence, which would be carried out by lethal injection.


#2

The sooner the better. The more that we share the air that he breathes, the more that that air becomes polluted.


#3

Death is too easy for scum like him, IMO.


#4

Whether there is an execution will depend of course on who is president.


#5

So we send the message that killing people is evil is evil by killing people? In my opinion the only thing that could make this tragedy worse has just happened


#6

Unfortunately none of the current candidates would commute his sentence to life in prison without parole .


#7

why has it taken so long for the trial to take place?


#8

Presumably military death-penalty trials, being fortunately very rare in the US forces in peacetime, take a long time to set up.

ICXC NIKA


#9

In Hasan’s case, this makes him a martyr too; except they were calling this workplace violence, this was a terrorist act and he wrote the terrorist kingpin, Al-Awlaki.


#10

I’m not sure that letting him go free, which would ultimately happen, would be any better.

ICXC NIKA


#11

If HRC is elected, nominates Obama to the USSC, and a new Democratic Senate confirms, could the new USSC stop the execution?


#12

Do we not fine people who have stolen, and imprison people who have kidnapped others? The rather significant problem with your argument is that it equates punishment with sin, which is not exactly how the church sees the matter: “[FONT=Arial]punishment is the effect of justice”[/FONT]. (Aquinas)

It is also true that the church has never said that all killing is evil. The church teaches that murder is evil, but since not all killing is murder, not all killing is wrong. Your objection suggests you believe the church has countenanced evil for centuries inasmuch as she has always acknowledged exceptions to the commandment that one should not kill.

Ender


#13

This is the right question to ask. There is no apparent justification for it to have taken over five years to get to trial. Our justice system really is a mess.

Ender


#14

The linked article is 2 1/2 years old.


#15

The Church teaches that legitimate authorities may carry out capital punishment. While I’m mixed on the issue of the death penalty, I do want to mention to you a passage from Genesis 9:6:

Anyone who sheds the blood of a human being,
by a human being shall that one’s blood be shed;
For in the image of God
have human beings been made.

Also a quote from Pope Pius XII:

Even when it is a question of the execution of a condemned man, the State does not dispose of the individual’s right to life. In this case it is reserved to the public power to deprive the condemned person of the enjoyment of life in expiation of his crime when, by his crime, he has already disposed himself of his right to live.

While we must offer forgiveness and compassion to criminals, we shouldn’t throw away the Church’s tradition of allowing the death penalty in grave circumstances (which you can carry out while offering forgiveness to the criminal).

And yes there has been movement in the church towards abolishing the death penalty, at the same time we should be aware of what the Church has taught about this throughout the centuries.


#16

Ah, well there is that. Still one can legitimately wonder why three years were necessary for the trial, although it goes a long way to explain why decades can pass in the appeals process. Do we know what the method of execution is in military cases?

Ender


#17

Military mills grind slowly.

In my day, it was regulated as hanging. Had detailed manual on just how.


#18

I sometimes wonder if the rise of Trump, with his rhetoric of killing even the families of terrorists, is not in some way predicated by what has effectively been the marshmallow response that has become the norm in the Western world. Shouts of DEATH TO AMERICA!! are being met with negotiations to give those people the bomb. Any and every response to terrorist attacks are met with such soul searching and fretting and worrying that we might offend somebody and make them really, really mad at us.

Because the pendulum has swung so far that we place the life of such treasonous murderers above and beyond everything else, that pendulum swinging back has cleared the way for demagogues that know how to take advantage of the righteous anger and use it to their own selfish ends.


#19

You are very right in this. Yesterday Rush Limbaugh had some good commentary on this. Normal people have been shushed in this country for too long. Those who are not homphobic are called homophobic. Those who are not racists are called racists. Those who are not bigots are called bigots. They are marginalized because they have their beliefs.

But I don’t believe america will go to the other extreme. Trump, like the majority of Americans is fed up with political correctness but is not devoid of common sense and goodness. Americans have a good heart and do a lot of good in this world. They just want to stand up for themsleves for a change.

Link to rush. Very good reading.

rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2016/03/04/trump_phenomenon_is_the_cork_popping_after_years_of_political_correctness


#20

I don’t much like Trump.
But I regard him as more of a blowhard than a devil.

I don’t much think that most of his supporters really want the wives and children of terrorists to be executed either. They can distinguish between rhetoric and reality well enough. Unlike Democrats who cheer Obama on for enabling the ayatollahs to become a nuclear nation, even Trumps supporters recognize that it is not America that will be threat to the nuclear annihilation of the world.
I do think however that people are tired of having to be concerned about the welfare of every ant and centipede in an area when it comes to waging war against people that mean America harm.

Even for people who are against capital punishment and are in step with the Catholic Church’s recent efforts to abolish the death penalty, the better response to people like Hassan getting injected needs to be “So what ?”
This is not the kind of man that anyone needs to hold up as a poster boy in their campaign to change the laws on capital punishment.


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