Just a quick question


#1

I’m looking at the schedule of a church where I will be visiting next week.
They list a “Shrove mass” on Tuesday. I know what the word shrove means, I’m just wondering if anyone knows what makes this sort of mass special? Is there a special confession part in it?

I’ve been to mass where there was, where everyone in the congregation got to quickly confess to a priest during the mass.


#2

I’m looking at the schedule of a church where I will be visiting next week.
They list a “Shrove mass” on Tuesday. I know what the word shrove means, I’m just wondering if anyone knows what makes this sort of mass special? Is there a special confession part in it?

I’ve been to mass where there was, where everyone in the congregation got to quickly confess to a priest during the mass.


#3

You know that day we call “Mardi Gras” and we throw parties, and then wake up next day to realize it’s Ash Wednesday, Lent just begun, and we must fast and abstain from meat? Well, that day is actually called Shrove Tuesday. It marks the end of the Pre-Lent (Septuagesima) Season.

However, since the discipline was relaxed after the liturgical reform, now we don’t have a Pre-Lent season :o so we don’t hear about Shrovertide or Shrove Tuesday any more…in fact, we don’t enter a penitential season until the sharp transition between Ordinary Time and Lent, which is as sharp as jumping from Mardi Gras to Ash Wednesday!

Anyways, back to topic. Shrove Tuesday marked the end of the Pre-Lent Season. It is also known as “Shrovetide Tuesday”. It takes its name from the English verb “to shrive”, which means to confess one’s sins and also to administer the sacrament of Confession. This recalls the custom of the Early Church that in the time immediately before Lent, the people were called to confession in order to be assigned a proper penance for Lent. And penance wasn’t as simple as giving up chocolate…

The Church repeatedly made efforts to check the excesses of the carnival. During the sixteenth century in particular a special form of the Forty Hours Prayer was instituted in many places on the Monday and Tuesday of Shrovetide, partly to draw the people away from these dangerous occasions of sin, partly to make expiation for the excesses committed.

About Confession during Mass: no, there is no special liturgy mixing these two Sacraments. The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments has affirmed the preference for celebrating reconciliation outside of Mass; yet, the canonical norm stating that “Reconciliation may be carried out at any time and day” allows for a non-celebrating priest to hear confessions during Mass.


#4

Is it normal on the Shrove mass to have the congregation confess?
I’m thinking about a mass I once attended, where in the middle of the mass, everyone was invited come up to the priest, who was stationed near the altar, and be confessed.

They had brought in two other priests so everyone got to confess privately to a priest, and then the rest of the mass was celebrated. I’m looking for that sort of mass to go to next week. I don’t know what to call it. I thought a “Shrove mass” might indicate it was that sort of mass…the schedule says this mass is and hour and a half, so I thought maybe, the extra time was for this sort of thing.


#5

If you need the Sacrament of Confession, you should go to any parish and ask to talk to a priest. They are canonically bound to hear your confession. Usually there is always a priest available even beyond the regular “time of confession”.

The Sacrament of the Eucharist is a liturgy with very clear rubrics. Innovations and changes are not allowed. To pause the Mass to offer the Sacrament of Reconciliation (or anything else) is , as far as I can tell, a liturgical abuse. I personally would not want to deliberately delay the Holy Mass by walking to the celebrating priest and confessing!


#6

By using the old word Shrove, the Parish is just using the old term for the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent.
To find out about the details in your inquirey, why not pick up a telephone and call the Church’s Rectory? They should be able to tell you, not the people on the internet.


#7

Likewise, check the web site of the Church.


#8

I will, thanks.


#9

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