Just As I Am... I Can't Turn Away


#1

Hello… It’s Me Again,

I appreciate all of the prayers and answers to the many questions that I’ve had over the past few months. You may recall that a matter of weeks ago I ended my inquiry into Catholicism and decided that I could not join into communion with Her.

I WAS WRONG!

The more I think about all that I’ve read and heard I cannot turn my back on the truth. I cannot help but think that your prayers played a part in this, and I’m excited, but also a little scared.

  1. I have ZERO time to attend RCIA classes. I work everyday and I’m on call so I never know when I’ll have to work or when I’ll be home. So showing up at a weekly class is out of the question, any ideas? Do I have to go to RCIA? I’ve read the Catechism, Christ Among Us (the book the Rcia Pragrams around here use) and numerous others. I have a pretty good grasp of the faith.

  2. I’m not sure that my wife will join with me. she seems disinterested, at best. Being a Husband, and a Father, I cannot see myself going to one church, and my family going elsewhere. Any Ideas?

  3. By doing this, it’s going to cause problems with some of my older relatives that I’ve attended the Baptist church with my whole life. They just believe that Catholicism is wrong, and you all know how old people are set in their ways, and I’m afraid they’ll take it personally.

Again, thank’s for your prayers, and thanks for knowing what you believe and helping to preserve the faith of our Fathers.

Peace of Christ,
Matt


#2

speak to a priest in the parish you hope to attend…

and congratulations…

:slight_smile:


#3

Another Question:

The nearest parish to me is about 15 miles away, it’s very small. However, the church I’m hopingto attend is anout 20 miles away, across the state line. Can I go there or do I have to attend the parish that’s in the diocese where my home is?


#4

Well… Glory Be To God! :irish2:

I’m really happy for you my friend and I kinda know what you mean about all this since I only returned to the faith myself about 5 years ago.

  1. Call the local pastor and tell him what the deal is with your schedule and all. You also need a sponsor for RCIA…sort of the Catholic buddy system. Pray about asking for time off from work to attend just as you would for any classes that you might take for your job. Some RCIA classes are like Sunday School and so that may help. Believe me, they will understand about being on call. One of the guys in our RCIA group was a volunteer firefighter, and we had no problems with that.

  2. If your wife is disinterested, then perhaps it’s time to have an honest talk with her and ask her to attend Mass with you. The ground work for this may have already been laid for this in your previous church in a submission teaching of some sort. If nothing else, you can always tell her that this is what the Holy Spirit is leading you in and that you want the ones that you love most to share in it.

  3. I understand, and you may catch some flak, but if you know your faith as well as I think you do you have already answered their questions and objections in your own heart. :slight_smile: Just keep on loving them the same way that you always have, just Catholic and the grief (if any) will pretty much pass, and if not…well… they can kill ya but they can’t eat ya.
    As you have already seen, ya just can’t argue with the Holy Spirit now can ya?

  4. Go to the one that you like, though maybe the nearer parish will get better. BTW…did ya happen to think that it’s no accident that you live in that parish? They might just need a guy like you.

If you need anything…we’ll be here for ya and feel free to PM or e-mail me if I can help in any way.
KNOW that you are included in all my prayers.
Pax tecum,


#5

I’ll be praying for you, Matt, and your wife and family as well. You’re doing the right thing, God will not lead you astray. Scott Hahn was Catholic several years before his wife finally realized the truth herself. It was tough in the meantime, but in the end the truth prevailed.

There are many, many converts on these forums, and most of us know, to some extent, what you are going through. God wants you here. He will show you the way.


#6

Today the ordinary way to enter the Church is through RCIA, however I think that the parish priest or pastor is free to bring you in without RCIA if he can determine whether or not you know what you are doing in joining the Church. From what you said you have studied you probably know what is necessary. Before we had RCIA we used Christ Among Us in meeting with potential converts. Catholicism for Dummies is also a good book that covers the basics very well. It seems to me it costs well under $20 from Amazon.com


#7

Thank you all, again.

If you could recommend one book about the Catholic faith, that is nicely written, easy to understand that I could give to my wife to help her understand all of this, which would it be? I’ve read books by Karl Keating, Scott Hahn, Pat Madrid, etc., and all of these accumulated to a great understanding of the faith, but none of them, by themselves, did a great job of systematic apolegy. I know my wife isn’t willing to read all of the books I’ve read or listen to all of the cd’s I’ve listened too, nor study the early Fathers like I have. So my question is, if you had to pick one book to explain the faith, or at least maximize someone’s interest in it, which one would it be?

Be Gods,
Matt


#8

[quote=Manphibian]Another Question:

The nearest parish to me is about 15 miles away, it’s very small. However, the church I’m hopingto attend is anout 20 miles away, across the state line. Can I go there or do I have to attend the parish that’s in the diocese where my home is?
[/quote]

you can attend either… or both… lol

:slight_smile:


#9

[quote=Manphibian]Hello… It’s Me Again,

I appreciate all of the prayers and answers to the many questions that I’ve had over the past few months. You may recall that a matter of weeks ago I ended my inquiry into Catholicism and decided that I could not join into communion with Her.

I WAS WRONG!

The more I think about all that I’ve read and heard I cannot turn my back on the truth. I cannot help but think that your prayers played a part in this, and I’m excited, but also a little scared.
[/quote]

I can so relate to this! I fought coming into the Church tooth and nail. I tossed and turned all night long for weeks on end trying to find a way out! But, the Holy Spirit is persistent, isn’t he?

  1. I have ZERO time to attend RCIA classes. I work everyday and I’m on call so I never know when I’ll have to work or when I’ll be home. So showing up at a weekly class is out of the question, any ideas? Do I have to go to RCIA? I’ve read the Catechism, Christ Among Us (the book the Rcia Pragrams around here use) and numerous others. I have a pretty good grasp of the faith.

You can schedule some time to be instructed privately by a priest or deacon. Inquire at a local parish or the diocese.

  1. I’m not sure that my wife will join with me. she seems disinterested, at best. Being a Husband, and a Father, I cannot see myself going to one church, and my family going elsewhere. Any Ideas?

You can attend with her on Sunday mornings and go to Mass earlier or to the Vigil Mass on Saturday evenings.

  1. By doing this, it’s going to cause problems with some of my older relatives that I’ve attended the Baptist church with my whole life. They just believe that Catholicism is wrong, and you all know how old people are set in their ways, and I’m afraid they’ll take it personally.

Yes, this can be quite hard, as many here can testify. But, if you let them know that you are not rejecting what they taught you but are endeavoring to enter into an even deeper relationship with Christ, in part due to their wonderful example to you, then they might be more accepting than if you tell them you are abandoning your faith for another, if you see what I mean. And truly, you aren’t abandoning your heritage, but building upon it because much of what our Baptist brethren believe is perfectly in line with Catholic teachings.

Again, thank’s for your prayers, and thanks for knowing what you believe and helping to preserve the faith of our Fathers.

Peace of Christ,
Matt

You are welcome! All the glory goes to God who has called many of us into apologetics where he can make use of our poor words to help each other grow in the faith of Christ in the Church he founded. God bless you. We will continue to pray for you, please pray for us! :slight_smile:


#10

[quote=Manphibian]Thank you all, again.

If you could recommend one book about the Catholic faith, that is nicely written, easy to understand that I could give to my wife to help her understand all of this, which would it be? I’ve read books by Karl Keating, Scott Hahn, Pat Madrid, etc., and all of these accumulated to a great understanding of the faith, but none of them, by themselves, did a great job of systematic apolegy. I know my wife isn’t willing to read all of the books I’ve read or listen to all of the cd’s I’ve listened too, nor study the early Fathers like I have. So my question is, if you had to pick one book to explain the faith, or at least maximize someone’s interest in it, which one would it be?

Be Gods,
Matt
[/quote]

Try Catholicism for Dummies (the title is meant to be humorous homage to the whole “This subject for Dummies” series of books not a description of those who might read it. :wink: )


#11

Congratulations, and WELCOME!!!

May God ever be your guide!

God Bless,
RyanL


#12

[quote=Manphibian]If you could recommend one book about the Catholic faith, that is nicely written, easy to understand that I could give to my wife to help her understand all of this, which would it be?
[/quote]

I think the personal conversion stories are a great way to start. Scott & Kimberly Hahn’s “Rome Sweet Home” and/or his conversion story on tape are both great. Also the series “Surprised by Truth” with several conversion stories in one book are great.

By the way, congratulations on your decision to join the Church and welcome home!


#13

[quote=Manphibian]Thank you all, again.

If you could recommend one book about the Catholic faith, that is nicely written, easy to understand that I could give to my wife to help her understand all of this, which would it be? I’ve read books by Karl Keating, Scott Hahn, Pat Madrid, etc., and all of these accumulated to a great understanding of the faith, but none of them, by themselves, did a great job of systematic apolegy. I know my wife isn’t willing to read all of the books I’ve read or listen to all of the cd’s I’ve listened too, nor study the early Fathers like I have. So my question is, if you had to pick one book to explain the faith, or at least maximize someone’s interest in it, which one would it be?

Be Gods,
Matt
[/quote]

Unabridged Christianity by Fr. Romero…absolutley amazing!


#14

One book? I am partial to the Lamb’s Supper, by Scott Hahn. However, I did not come from a Baptist background. But it was the Eucharist that brought me home. And his book just made every sense in the world.

But whatever book you decide on, I personally think a book that quotes lots of Scripture is one of the most helpful ones. I mean, she knows that it is God’s inspired word, she just needs to be shown the proper interpretation. :slight_smile:

God Bless you and may God’s will be your family join you soon.

Maria


#15

[quote=Manphibian]Hello… It’s Me Again,

I appreciate all of the prayers and answers to the many questions that I’ve had over the past few months. You may recall that a matter of weeks ago I ended my inquiry into Catholicism and decided that I could not join into communion with Her.

I WAS WRONG!

The more I think about all that I’ve read and heard I cannot turn my back on the truth. I cannot help but think that your prayers played a part in this, and I’m excited, but also a little scared.

  1. I have ZERO time to attend RCIA classes. I work everyday and I’m on call so I never know when I’ll have to work or when I’ll be home. So showing up at a weekly class is out of the question, any ideas? Do I have to go to RCIA? I’ve read the Catechism, Christ Among Us (the book the Rcia Pragrams around here use) and numerous others. I have a pretty good grasp of the faith.

  2. I’m not sure that my wife will join with me. she seems disinterested, at best. Being a Husband, and a Father, I cannot see myself going to one church, and my family going elsewhere. Any Ideas?

  3. By doing this, it’s going to cause problems with some of my older relatives that I’ve attended the Baptist church with my whole life. They just believe that Catholicism is wrong, and you all know how old people are set in their ways, and I’m afraid they’ll take it personally.

Again, thank’s for your prayers, and thanks for knowing what you believe and helping to preserve the faith of our Fathers.

Peace of Christ,
Matt
[/quote]

Wow…what a post. You’ve been on an amazing road to the Faith—this really shows the power of the Holy Spirit working in your life, drawing you to His Church. God bless!!

As for your questions:

  1. Talk to a priest and see what can be done. He might be able to work with you personally, when your schedule permits. Make sure he’s a good, solid orthodox priest!

  2. I’m so sorry about this, and I’m sure it causes you pain—but don’t give up. Go to Mass, and go with her to her church if that makes life easier (though do not partake of their communion). Above all, be the best, most loving husband you can be: let your actions show that becoming a good Catholic Christian, ever striving for holiness, makes you a better husband.

  3. You have a difficult road. Again, just be the best son-in-law you can be. Don’t let yourself be drawn into arguments (from what you say, it’s unlikely that you will change their minds), but if they attack specific doctrines you can give them reading material—the articles at catholic.com are good for that purpose. That’s a fairly benign way of dealing with arguments.

  4. As for attending one parish over another: it’s handy to live close by if you become involved in parish life (which I would heartily recommend—we’re supposed to be a community), as it will be less of a big deal to commute. However, a vibrant and orthodox parish wins hands down, in my book. I drive 45 minutes to go to my parish because it is orthodox, vibrant, beautiful, and distinctly Catholic. The parishes around here that are much closer aren’t. I will say that being so far away is a challenge (I really go through the gas…) because I’m very involved in our parish.

You’ll be in my prayers.


#16

SHERLOCK!

Man those cd’s were really great and a HUGE help! PM me with your address and I’ll get them back to you! Thanks for all of your help.

Matt


#17

Matt:

Congratulations on your epiphany!!! As the others have already said, expect sacrifices and difficulty. Use them as your offerings for your intentions.

One book: Theology for Beginners by Frank Sheed. If I may offer some suggestions, leave the books lying around so that it’s always available for your wife to pick up. I’m sure somewhere in her she’s wondering what the heck happened that you have to make such a drastic change. And she might peruse through them one time or another.

RCIA is the normal route. Seeing others in the same journey is comforting. To a certain degree, this comraderie although not essential is great support.

God bless your path. Keep us posted.

in XT.


#18

[quote=Manphibian]Hello… It’s Me Again,

I appreciate all of the prayers and answers to the many questions that I’ve had over the past few months. You may recall that a matter of weeks ago I ended my inquiry into Catholicism and decided that I could not join into communion with Her.

I WAS WRONG!

The more I think about all that I’ve read and heard I cannot turn my back on the truth. I cannot help but think that your prayers played a part in this, and I’m excited, but also a little scared.

  1. I have ZERO time to attend RCIA classes. I work everyday and I’m on call so I never know when I’ll have to work or when I’ll be home. So showing up at a weekly class is out of the question, any ideas? Do I have to go to RCIA? I’ve read the Catechism, Christ Among Us (the book the Rcia Pragrams around here use) and numerous others. I have a pretty good grasp of the faith.

  2. I’m not sure that my wife will join with me. she seems disinterested, at best. Being a Husband, and a Father, I cannot see myself going to one church, and my family going elsewhere. Any Ideas?

  3. By doing this, it’s going to cause problems with some of my older relatives that I’ve attended the Baptist church with my whole life. They just believe that Catholicism is wrong, and you all know how old people are set in their ways, and I’m afraid they’ll take it personally.

Again, thank’s for your prayers, and thanks for knowing what you believe and helping to preserve the faith of our Fathers.

Peace of Christ,
Matt
[/quote]

Dear Matt

I was so happy and excited for you when I read this post, that I actually went back and read every post you have made here on CAF. I think my mouse is a little dented actually :wink:
Wow! What an amazing journey. Im so grateful to everyone here that helped you. Im humbled by your efforts on finding the Truth.
Oh and that first paragraph on your very first post on August with the “dented mouse” thing was priceless :slight_smile:

Welcome Home

:blessyou:

Oh and one more thing, you need to change your religion on your profile now :wink:


#19

I second the poster who recommended Rome, Sweet Home by Scott and Kimberly Hahn. Not only because it is a great book, but because each of them tells their own story. Maybe reading Kimberly’s own words will help your wife in some way. Anyhow, leave it to the Holy Spirit. It’s His job.

Peace,
Linda


#20

If I had to pick 2 books for your use with your wife, I’d recommend
"We Believe…" By Fr. Oscar Lukefahr which can be got FREE from The Catholic Home Study Service . It’s part of a Catholic Course series, but the book itself is so good that even if she doesn’t take the course she’ll get a lot out of it… Maybe you take the course and she reads the book?

The other I recommend is any of the “Surprised By Truth” books, especially the very first one.
Pax tecum,


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