Just got back from my first Tridentine Latin Mass

All I can say is “WOW”. It was a very beautiful mass and noticeably different from the normal mass I go to on every Sunday. First off, I was really intimidated about going, because I don’t know Latin (I am trying to learn it though), and I was scared I wouldn’t know what was going on. I had a missal, but I still really couldn’t keep up with the progression of the mass, for the most part. I was able to keep up with it in a few spots, but they were few and far between. Is this normal? I hope I am not just an idiot. I can’t wait to go back. I know the more I go, the better I will become with understanding the progression of the mass and be able to keep up.

I also was not able to hear most of the Latin the Priest was saying during his prayers with his back turned towards the Church…I believe that is normal though, right?? I also liked how Communion is taken while knealing down. I was probably the youngest person there (25)…it was mostly older people. And the women dressed a lot differently than I am used to seeing at the mass at St. Joseph’s Cathedral.

Overall…I loved it and I can’t wait to go back. I have to study my missal more so I can keep up. I also plan on learning Latin as well. Anyone else have a similar first experience?

I had a missal, but I still really couldn’t keep up with the progression of the mass, for the most part. I was able to keep up with it in a few spots, but they were few and far between. Is this normal? I hope I am not just an idiot. I can’t wait to go back. I know the more I go, the better I will become with understanding the progression of the mass and be able to keep up.

Give it time and you will able to follow it - pay attention to the actions of the priests and the altar boys for clues as well as the words - sit as close to the front as you can while learning.

I also was not able to hear most of the Latin the Priest was saying during his prayers with his back turned towards the Church…I believe that is normal though, right??

So I am guessing it was a low Mass - that is not sung? There are certain parts of the Mass that are said silently or soto voce but you can read them along with him in the missal just the same.

QUOTE] I also liked how Communion is taken while knealing down. I was probably the youngest person there (25)…it was mostly older people. And the women dressed a lot differently than I am used to seeing at the mass at St. Joseph’s Cathedral

.

Well that may be in some parishes but most of the Tridentine Masses I have attended in several areas have a lot of young married couples with children. The dress was more modest, right? Also probably a lot of the women wore altar veils (little lace head dressings)

Overall…I loved it and I can’t wait to go back. I have to study my missal more so I can keep up. I also plan on learning Latin as well. Anyone else have a similar first experience?

Well my first experience was before Vatican II but my first experience after that was only about 8 years ago. I too had trouble following at first since it had been many years but it did not take long to keep up. I hope you can go to a high Mass as well - that is even more beautiful with the music.

So far I have only known one person who went and said they did not like it. But that person had already made up his mind I think. I had challenged him about posting negative things about the Tridentine Mass without ever having gone. So he went but did not change his mind about anything.

For some of us it iis like a drink of water in a spiritual desert or like spiritual food to a starving man - for others it may not be.

What is the difference between high and low mass, and when is high mass held?

I had many of the same questions when I started going earlier this year. There are portions of the Mass that are said by the Priest that you wont be able to hear, but within a few weeks you’ll be able to follow along more easily, I’m on about 3 months of regular attendance, and have no trouble following the Mass. I’m surprised to hear that most people there were older, my expirience has been that there are people of all ages that attend, but a bit of a gap in the 45-60 age range. I would also second the recommendation to attend a high mass, among other differences the Mass is sung, and incense is used, ask at your Church for the schedule.

Is there certain days that High Mass is done? Now that I have experienced my first Tridentine Latin Mass, I can’t get enough info on it. There is so much I want to learn about it…I can’t wait until I go back next Sunday.

Is the homily in English?

[quote=carol marie]Is the homily in English?
[/quote]

Yes, the homily is always in the vernacular. Also, ninety-nine times out of a hundred, the priest will either read the Epistle and Gospel in English before his homily or they will be printed in the tri-fold.

Low Mass is spoken, High Mass is sung.

During low Mass the responses are given by the Altar boys, and during a high Mass they are sung by the choir.

We had a High Mass today because of the Feast of the Assumption.

With a high Mass often the choir will sing the ordinaries and the Schola will sing the propers and the priest sings (chants) his parts.

When the sung part like the Credo, or Kyrie or Gloria take longer to sing than it does the priest to say it, he and all sit until the choir is done.

There is a lot more incensing too. It is very beautiful

At the end of the low Mass there will usually be the Lenontine prayers after Mass.

[quote=deogratias]Low Mass is spoken, High Mass is sung.

During low Mass the responses are given by the Altar boys, and during a high Mass they are sung by the choir.

We had a High Mass today because of the Feast of the Assumption.

With a high Mass often the choir will sing the ordinaries and the Schola will sing the propers and the priest sings (chants) his parts.

When the sung part like the Credo, or Kyrie or Gloria take longer to sing than it does the priest to say it, he and all sit until the choir is done.

There is a lot more incensing too. It is very beautiful

At the end of the low Mass there will usually be the Lenontine prayers after Mass.
[/quote]

The TLM is divided into three divisions:
Low Mass: recited
Sung Mass: sung by one priest; no subdeacon or deacon
High Mass: A Sung Mass with a subdeacon and deacon

The TLM is divided into three divisions:
Low Mass: recited
Sung Mass: sung by one priest; no subdeacon or deacon
High Mass: A Sung Mass with a subdeacon and deacon

\

Well I was trying to keep it simple for the new person but if we are going to be accurate lets do it

Low Mass - Recited by the priest, assisted by a server.

Missa Cantata - (sometimes called a high Mass) Sung by the priest with the assistance of a choir.

Solemn High Mass - Sung Mass with a choir and the ceremonies are quite elaborate. The priest is attended by a deacon, a subdeacon and acolytes.

We had a High Mass today also. It was my first time to a High Mass. It was the most beautiful service I have ever been too including Christmas. We had 7 priests 2 lay deacons and 4 alter boys. They had a procession after Mass around the church and out to the staue of the Blessed Mother and back in. The older priest sang the Mass. Some pople like the younger priest but the older one really speaks loud and it is easy to follow. We also had the women’s and men’s choir. The Mass ran about an hour and 45 minutes,
The Church I go to has alot of young familie. Very mixed age. I would say about a 1/3 are older and most are earlly 40’s to 20’s and families. I’m so glad I started going to the Latin service it may be long but so much more spiritual at least for me.
Kathy

[quote=Pandora]We had a High Mass today also. It was my first time to a High Mass. It was the most beautiful service I have ever been too including Christmas. We had 7 priests 2 lay deacons and 4 alter boys. They had a procession after Mass around the church and out to the staue of the Blessed Mother and back in. The older priest sang the Mass. Some pople like the younger priest but the older one really speaks loud and it is easy to follow. We also had the women’s and men’s choir. The Mass ran about an hour and 45 minutes,
The Church I go to has alot of young familie. Very mixed age. I would say about a 1/3 are older and most are earlly 40’s to 20’s and families. I’m so glad I started going to the Latin service it may be long but so much more spiritual at least for me.
Kathy
[/quote]

7 priests? 2 lay deacons? A Traditional Latin Mass only has one priest celebrating unless it is an ordination of priests or consecration of bishops. I don’t understand that? I’m confused. You go to HolyTrinity,Boston?

Man O Man, do I have the same feelings. I have been to the Brompton Oratory in London for Easter and Palm Sunday a number of times (on vacation) and it is indescribable, a chanted Passion, oh my gosh, wow. At St. John Cantius in Chicago, wow! I want the Latin Mass, it is so beautiful, so gorgeous, so reverent, as opposed to the all to common sing-songy NO. I just find it more prayerful, but that is just me.

Maybe it was a Priest, Deacons, Subdeacon and Acolytes and not 7 priests

Here are some pictures of a Solemn High Mass

unavoce.org/jubilee2000buffalo.htm

It might have just been priests and deacons, but just sitting on the side. :cool:

[quote=Catholic Eagle]7 priests? 2 lay deacons? A Traditional Latin Mass only has one priest celebrating unless it is an ordination of priests or consecration of bishops. I don’t understand that? I’m confused. You go to HolyTrinity,Boston?
[/quote]

Allright…I am more consused now. LOL

I was an altar boy and all masses in my days were in Latin.

Though I can agree that it can be beautiful - the music, the hymns, the mystery of it all.

It is akin to going to an opera - everything in Italian but you don’t understand a word (maybe some).

Ok I can understand the Credo, Kyrie, Gloria and Angus Dei, so they are meaningful and spiritual for me

BUT

Latin mass, lovely as it is, is more entertaining than meaningful for a non-Latin speaking person.

Masses were made vernacular after Vatican II so that we all can appreciate the meaning and spirit of the mass better.

Want a more beautiful and inspiring vernacular mass? - Get the choir to buck up.
:slight_smile:

Latin mass, lovely as it is, is more entertaining than meaningful for a non-Latin speaking person

Well that’s your opinion anyway. I don’t speak Latin but I can read English printed in the missal beside the Latin. I don’t go to be entertained. I find it much more spiritual and far less “entertaining” than the modern Masses. .

[quote=bob]I was an altar boy and all masses in my days were in Latin.

Though I can agree that it can be beautiful - the music, the hymns, the mystery of it all.

It is akin to going to an opera - everything in Italian but you don’t understand a word (maybe some).

Ok I can understand the Credo, Kyrie, Gloria and Angus Dei, so they are meaningful and spiritual for me

BUT

Latin mass, lovely as it is, is more entertaining than meaningful for a non-Latin speaking person.

Masses were made vernacular after Vatican II so that we all can appreciate the meaning and spirit of the mass better.

Want a more beautiful and inspiring vernacular mass? - Get the choir to buck up.
:slight_smile:
[/quote]

The current vernacular stinks. ICEL has done a horrible job at translatiing the Mass into English, HORRIBLE!!

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