Just wondering...what do Catholics and Protestants like about each other?


#1

I am curious about the following…

First, for all the Catholics who care to answer…

Is there anything, anything at all, that you sincerely admire about the Protestant churches?

Conversely, for all the Protestants out there, is there anything you sincerely admire about the Catholic Church?

To get this started, I (as a Protestant) deeply admire the sense of reverence and awe towards God that is evident in the Catholic litanies…on top of which they are gorgeous expressions of prayer that most of the Protestant churches I have encountered don’t seem to include. Also, the idea that great beauty and worship don’t have to be mutually exclusive :thumbsup:

Anyone else?

Zirconia


#2

I like the Zeal of the Protestants as long as they don’t say that the Pope is the Anti-Christ and that the Vatican is the whore of Babylon.

Seriously though, I admire their commitment against abortion and other immoralities that we Catholic also condemned.

I also like the fact that they love Jesus and the Scripture. It’s a pity I could not share the Blessed Sacrament when them.


#3

When they are not trying to beat me over the head with it, their reverenve and love of Scripture. However this is not to say that this same love and reverence can’t be found with us Catholics (this site more than proves that).

God bless


#4

I admire the warm fellowship and sense of community found in Protestant churches. As a former Protestant, that is maybe the only thing I truly miss now that I’m Catholic.

I also admire the vibrancy of Protestant youth. Most of the Protestant communities I know are very effective at engaging their young people in learning and living their faith.


#5

The things I admire most about Catholics…

Their flexible worship service times, you can usually go as early as 4pm on Saturday and up to 100 pm on Sunday, very family friendly to do it that way.

The beauty of their churches.

The recent Popes attempt to unify Christianity.

Commitment to the poor in my area.

Great schools.

Liturgy liturgy liturgy.

More things of course. But thats a start.
BH


#6

To be honest and true to myself and God.

I am Anti-Protestant because I am Anti-Heresy.


#7

All I can say is that, in practical cricumstances, there is rightly fellowship where there was once enmity. One cannot say the same about sects of Islam.

Let me tell you a little story. I am Catholic. I’ve been a church organist all my mature life (I played my first service, which was a Mass, when I was 15). For pecuniary as well as artistic reasons, I have been more in the employ of protestant denominations more than with the Catholics. I have also always lived alone.

About five years ago, I contracted a horrible disease that would surely have proved fatal if I had been left alone or only with the medical establishment to deal with it. In fact, I have had a complete recovery that still has the doctors scratching their heads, but the unsolicited intercession of St. Jude and the Blessed Virgin aside, it was my “protestant” faith community (they were United Methodists, if you must know) that truly saved my life. In the United States at least, church is family, and within that context people are the only important thing. The sabbath was made for man, not man for the sabbath.


#8

I like the wonderful way most Pentecostal and Evangelical type organizations are able to get huge crowds of young people to sing about Jesus through rock/pop/upbeat music.

Hillsong comes to mind.


#9

What I love about Protestants: Pot luck dinners.

I’ve been to many many delicious picnic/potluck dinners held by Protestant Churches. Those ladies can cook! I miss that.

:slight_smile: CM


#10

I agree with one of the above posters. I loved the warmth and fellowship of the Protestant church that we used to be members of. As Catholic converts we have not really felt that and it is a huge loss to us. Although we love the Catholic Church and truly feel like we’ve come home we don’t feel the familial ties that we expected. Maybe with time we’ll develop those strong relationships.


#11

Well as a protestant i love Catholicism doctrine and their dogma. However as a protestant probably i would like to share with the Catholics to see an additional importance of

  1. Fellowshipping after/before Mass
  2. Tithing
  3. Ministry
  4. Evangelizing
  5. Spend more time reading the bible

#12

Great thread. In no particular order.

EWTN rocks over anything non Catholic I have seen on the tube.

Pope JP II and Mother Theresa.

Catholics know, love, and appreciate their history. Non Catholics are history illiterate.

Communion once a week plus a spirit of reverence and honor in communion.

Confession.

As over-the-top as it can get here at times, nonCatholic forums are generally worse.

Catholics who get their faith are remarkably loyal and decidated Christians. They are not moving back and forth in search of the latest fads du jour.

From what I have seen, Catholics who get their faith generally stay with their faith at a larger percentage than nonCatholics.

The Catholic Charismatic movement does not seem as wierd as some of the nonCatholic Word of Faith churches.

Benny Hinn is not Catholic.

The consistency of Catholic worship. Catholicism doesn’t need to reinvent itself every 10 years or so.

Catholic church buildings are nice and beautiful. Too many nonCatholic churches are warehouses.

That’s good enough for starters I 'spose.


#13

Hi,

Please don’t forget the Episcopalians, in my opinion with us you get the best of both traditions! :slight_smile:

God Bless,
Jokerz


#14

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


#15

I have to second the :rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:


#16

The fellowship at evangelical churches is wonderful.

When the Passion of the Christ was first released one of the local evangelical churches offered a study group for it. And since my Catholic church didn’t (inspite of the wonderful resources available) I participated in theirs. It was wonderful to engage in a discussion like that. And even though I was an unfamiliar face I was warmly welcomed and included in the discussion.


#17

Hi,

I love the CC buildings. They are breathtaking!

The short services.:o The fact that there are many services available.:o

The fact that the CC doesnt cave into secular movements.

They have CCD–formalize teaching of their faith. Although we do too but it is not required. I want it too be required. Im working on it in my church:thumbsup:


#18

A few thoughts, from a Lutheran –

Some things I like about Catholics and Catholicism:

  1. Faithfulness to the Triune God
  2. Liturgy (I really appreciate the Latin Mass)
  3. EWTN
  4. Ecumenical Outreach (e.g., the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification)
  5. Reverence toward the Blessed Sacrament

Expanding on the OP’s request, here are a few things that I’m on the fence about::confused:

  1. Invocation of the saints
  2. Devotion to Mary (I’m not saying that she should not be honored for her role in salvation history)
  3. Eucharistic adoration
  4. The authority of the Pope (I certainly admire the late John Paull II as a leader within the Christian community)

And, in a further expansion, some things that drive me nuts::banghead:

  1. Catholics (and Lutherans) who continue to live in the 16th century with regard to our relationships with each other.
  2. The argument that Luther started a new religion (I consider Christianity to be a religion – Lutheranism is within that religion)

As I look at it, perhaps the latter two categories should be separate threads.

Peace,
Pastor Gary


#19

Definitely one thing I love about Protestant churches (and miss the most) are the classic hymns. I remember growing up we would sing all of the verses to the hymns. There is such beautiful music in Protestant churches.


#20

Here’s a few more:

Understanding that not everyone has the gift of Holy Matrimony
Frequent reception of Communion

And I am most definitely in agreement with the posters who have mentioned the glorious churches dedicated to the glory of God (swoon)…

Zirconia


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