Kids 'Thank' Michelle Obama for 'Mystery Mush' School Lunches


#1

Yahoo!

Kids ‘Thank’ Michelle Obama for ‘Mystery Mush’ School Lunches

WASHINGTON — School kids are giving thanks to first lady Michelle Obama just in time for the holiday – with a sarcastic Twitter hashtag about unappealing school lunches.

Along with photos of unsavory-looking school meals, the hashtag #ThanksMichelleObama was among the top trends on Twitter within the United States for a time on Friday.

The first lady has become the symbol of healthier school meals as she has pushed standards implemented in 2012 that require more fruits, vegetables and whole grains in the lunch line in an effort to combat childhood obesity. There are also limits on sodium, sugar and fat.

While many schools have put the standards in place successfully, others have said some of the new foods end up in the trash can.

Many of the photos have a Thanksgiving theme – think sad-looking stuffing – while others are everyday meals. The hashtag appears to have started around two years ago, but didn’t really catch on until Friday after several websites picked it up.

Ungrateful brats! Don’t they know she’s trying to help them?


#2

The result of the lunch changes have made for some really strange lunches in the school that I work for. Combinations like chicken nuggets and hummus or a taco and mashed potato. Normal combinations no longer meet the guidelines. However, the “mystery mush” shown in the link is clearly an error in preperation, not in content.


#3

One of the schools in the Chicago suburbs dealt with the problem in a very clever way.

The school officials were frustrated that the “healthy” foods were ending up in the wastebasket, and that the kids were so hungry by the time they got home that they were wolfing down easy-to-prep junk food.

This was costing everyone money.

So the school decided to jettison their federal funded lunch program and hire a private caterer to prep school lunches and make food that the kids actually liked and ate. The results were as you would expect–the kids loved the food and ATE it. Less waste, less hunger in the afternoon.

Private enterprise–it’s the best!


#4

Last week I shared a Thanksgiving lunch with my grandson. It was a typical thanksgiving with turkey, cranberries, green beans, mashed potatoes, and stuffing. The turkey and cranberries were the only 2 items I thought tasted halfway decent. I told him next year he can take his lunch to school on that day. Many other kids were not participating. He tried to warn me it wasn’t very good. I looked forward to my school lunches back in the 50’s and 60’s.


#5

Interesting. I never realized she had actually put guidelines in place for schools to follow. I missed that I guess. I knew it was her “campaign”, but I thought only from an educational standpoint. From the pictures, it looks pretty gross. Kids need to eat during the day while at school!


#6

And it’s exactly the same lunch that’s served at Sidwell Friends… oh, wait… it isn’t?

And yes, I know SF is a private school. The point is, the “regular kids” are supposed to be happy with gruel being served to them, rather than something that’s both nutritious and appealing.


#7

Private enterprise is great when you can afford it. Where does this school’s lunch program leave lower income kids? If they opt out of the federal program I’m assuming they don’t have to provide free or reduced lunch. The story I found didn’t mention the details of how it works, just how profitable it is for the school.


#8

Like something out of “Oliver Twist,” isn’t it? “Please, Mrs. Obama, may we have some more?” Who knew that the job description of a First Lady included dictating public school lunches?


#9

I just knew the focus of the original post would move from the subject to a political commentary…just took longer than I thought!


#10

It also reminds me of the lunch scene with Winston and Syme in 1984 where they get their “regulation lunch” that contains “pink ish-grey stew”. Stay hungry my friends!

Anyways, that mush is gross. Did anyone actually ask anyone who knows about nutritional meals what would be a good option for lunches? Probably not.


#11

The OP was a political commentary. What I find it absurd is that the federal government is getting involved in what local school districts serve their students .


#12

At least where I live, this has turned into a money-maker for the school. The school has vending machines for other food and, not surprisingly, kids have turned to them in large numbers.


#13

HASHtag? Mystery MUSH? Am I the only one who thought that this juxtaposition was funny?

:smiley:


#14

Perhaps you could enlighten me as to how my post was in any way inconsistent with, or more “political” than, the OP.


#15

We used to call it SOS


#16

I’m just guessing, but a school administration that can figure out how to beat a bad system can probably figure out how to feed their students who are low-income. I doubt that poor students are allowed to go hungry all day at that school. If they are, then the students, teachers, administrators, and parents in that school are monsters.

Give people credit for being charitable and kind to each other. It’s easier to be charitable when the government doesn’t do it all for you. When the government does it all, then we tend to not even notice the hungry and the poor because we assume that they are being taken care of.


#17

One of my favorites when I was in the Air Force :smiley:


#18

Devastating point. All children are equal … but some are more equal than others. Reminds me of how in the old Soviet Union “the people” owned all the cars … but it was the party members got to drive them.

Such well made nutritional plans! Such an unexpectedly bad result! But when the importance of a program outweighs the importance of the people it “serves” - well - garbage resulted here. :shrug:


#19

I was thinking “Soilent Green”.


#20

They may not taste great, but they ARE less filling. :wink:


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