King James Version...


#1

What is a coprehensive history of this verions, I’m arguing with my brother where it came from, and I’m almost clueless about it…


#2

Check you mail Valtiel. I sent you a long one with a history that you are looking for.

BTW…as a contemporary, you might wanna look into the Douay-Rheims version, which is Catholic and preceded the KJV by 2 years.
Pax tecum,


#3

Valtiel
Here is a short history, for longer histories use google and search for “kjv history”.
The KJV was commissioned by King James I in 1604. He wanted a new translation because he felt that the Bishops Bible was a poor translation. He had wrote to Bishop Bancroft and asked him to, “appoint certain learned men, to the number of four and fifty, for the translating of the Bible.” These men were the best biblical scholars and linguists of their day. Forty-seven men were eventually decided upon. They were organized into six groups. Group 1, 10 men met at Westminster and were assigned Genesis through 2 Kings. Grp 2 of eight men were at Cambridge and had 1 Chronicles - Ecclesiastes, while seven others handled the Apocrypha. Grp 3, seven men met at Oxford and translated Isaiah - Malachi, another 8 at Oxford occupied themselves with the Gospels, Acts and The Apocolypse.
They used Greek and Hebrew texts as well as past english translations, Tyndales, Matthews, Coverdales, Whitchurch and Geneva.
The translating was completed in 1611 and since has gone through numerous revisions. The most significant was in 1885 when the Apocrypha was removed.
This is a short history and very condensed, google it for a better history.
James


#4

Yes, also let him know the original KJV translation included the 7 books protestants left out. I gues the Holy Spirit changed his mind some time later!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_James_Bible#Difference_in_the_contents


#5

[quote=jako]The translating was completed in 1611 and since has gone through numerous revisions. The most significant was in 1885 when **the Apocrypha ** was removed.
[/quote]

You mean the deuterocanonicals. :slight_smile:

Five Myths About Seven Books
envoymagazine.com/backissues/1.2/marapril_story2.html


#6

[quote=Church Militant]Check you mail Valtiel. I sent you a long one with a history that you are looking for.

BTW…as a contemporary, you might wanna look into the Douay-Rheims version, which is Catholic and preceded the KJV by 2 years.
Pax tecum,
[/quote]

Thank you but I already had gotten that one from wikkipedia, word for word in fact…


#7

[quote=auhsoj88]Yes, also let him know the original KJV translation included the 7 books protestants left out. I gues the Holy Spirit changed his mind some time later!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_James_Bible#Difference_in_the_contents
[/quote]

Yes already checked it out, right after I made this post I thought to check wikkipedia…


#8

[quote=Church Militant]Check you mail Valtiel. I sent you a long one with a history that you are looking for.

BTW…as a contemporary, you might wanna look into the Douay-Rheims version, which is Catholic and preceded the KJV by 2 years.
Pax tecum,
[/quote]

Which codex was used for the King James version? Did the KJV come from the Latin Vulgate which came from the Alexandrian text? I would be interested in hearing a short synopsis of the different codices and their relative integrity. Which codex is considered best? Which is the worst?

Thanks in advance!


#9

God Himself decended on a cloud and handed it to King James.

See, here’s an ancient painting depicting the event.

http://img167.echo.cx/img167/8315/kjv8qx.jpg


#10

[quote=Trelow]God Himself decended on a cloud and handed it to King James.

See, here’s an ancient painting depicting the event.

http://img167.echo.cx/img167/8315/kjv8qx.jpg
[/quote]

You got it all wrong. God handed it to the apostles and then they made photocopies and passed them out to everyone.:stuck_out_tongue:


#11

[quote=auhsoj88]Yes, also let him know the original KJV translation included the 7 books protestants left out. I gues the Holy Spirit changed his mind some time later!

[/quote]

Man! I HATE when that happens! :eek:


#12

[quote=Genesis315]You got it all wrong. God handed it to the apostles and then they made photocopies and passed them out to everone.:stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

Yeah…right there at the Jerusalem Kinkos wasn’t it? :slight_smile:


#13

[quote=Fidelis]You mean the deuterocanonicals. :slight_smile:

Five Myths About Seven Books
envoymagazine.com/backissues/1.2/marapril_story2.html
[/quote]

Yes I did mean the Deuterocanonicals. I don’t like “apocrypha” either, it’s just easier to spell.:smiley:


#14

A very good history of the KJV has been published in the last three or four years. Probably still in print and available from Amazon.com. I can’t remember author or title and the actual book that I ordered was given as a gift to my daughter-in-law in California after I read it. Sneaky?


#15

Not to put too fine a point on it, but I have heard someone say seriously that if the King James Version was good enough for Paul and Barnabas, it was good enough for him.

There is also a strand of fundamentalist Judaism that teaches that God dictated the Torah word for word to Moses during the 40 days he spent on Mount Sinai. That’s the whole Torah, including the part at the end of Deuteronomy that describes the death of Moses.

  • Liberian

#16

Actually, King James did not commission the translation. It is unlikely that he ever even read it. The leading clergy in the CofE were the ones who saw the need for a standard translation. (There were a lot of them going around at the time.–Translations, I mean, not :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: leading clergy…)
King James agreed to the translation after some major flattery by those who saw the need. He insisted on it having his name on it, before he would agree. (Which begs the question: Why have we never “dumped” the old reprobate’s name? He’s been dead for centuries; I don’t :stuck_out_tongue: think we will end up in the Tower of London at this point…).


#17

Here’s a very comprehensive site on the KJV including the fact that The Deuteros were used in worship! In addition, it has photos of the of the original manuscripts.
They also provide a study of the errors in the KJV’s of the Bible that were acknowledged by the authors and the church of England and revised to conform to, guess what? The Douay Rheims.


#18

TNT wrote:

Here’s a very comprehensive site on the KJV including the fact that The Deuteros were used in worship! In addition, it has photos of the of the original manuscripts.
They also provide a study of the errors in the KJV’s of the Bible that were acknowledged by the authors and the church of England and revised to conform to, guess what? The Douay Rheims.

Well! Wadda Ya No! You just beat me to the button, TNT. I was just about to post the same URL!

This is a very good resource for material on this subject. I would add, however, that the Webmaster is Charles “the Hammer” Goldstein - a Rad Trad, Feeneyite associate of the brothers David and John Brindle. As such they are very hard-line St Benedict Center supporters and of the OSJ.


#19

[quote=Sean O L]TNT wrote:

Well! Wadda Ya No! You just beat me to the button, TNT. I was just about to post the same URL!

This is a very good resource for material on this subject. I would add, however, that the Webmaster is Charles “the Hammer” Goldstein - a Rad Trad, Feeneyite associate of the brothers David and John Brindle. As such they are very hard-line St Benedict Center supporters and of the OSJ.
[/quote]

I only use them for Prot. Apologetics. I’ve ever taken the time to read any internal maters to the Catholic Church.
Thanks.


#20

[quote=TNT]Here’s a very comprehensive site on the KJV including the fact that The Deuteros were used in worship!
[/quote]

You know I could never get that myself. The Anglican church said those books were not good for doctrines, but they were healthy to read to enhance your faith and they gave you a feel of the history of the time they were written (i.e. the Jews at the time of Christ believed in the intercession of saints, penance, and praying for the dead) but you can’t have that in your faith life. :confused: It’s even more confusing that they were read in church. The readings for July in one of the older versions of the KJV. had July 1st, the Visitation of Mary. July 6th, St. Anne (not mentioned anywhere in the Bible.)
With readings from Sirach for some days that month.


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