Kissing during the S O T C


#1

I have noticed that some people do not make the sign of the cross in the usual way, and it seems to be increasing. After the finish the sign of the cross they end by kissing the fingers they crossed with.

What does this mean, is it new, or is it associated with one group more that others?

:confused:


#2

If you make a loose fist with the thumb outside of the forefinger that will make a small cross that is why some people kiss their thumb as their personal cross. I have also observed some people of Italian descent do this, I think it is cultural and not sure what that means.:)


#3

As Tarrat said, they're making a cross with their thumb and first finger and kissing the cross. I see it largely among Latinos.


#4

As other have said, they are making a cross with their fingers and kissing the cross. Mostly people from countries or cultures which speak the Romance Languages.

These people will also kiss the Cross on their Rosary or necklace.

It's a public display of their lover for Christ.


#5

Vi-VA-la differance:thumbsup:


#6

Yes, I learned to do it that way.

We say, "Por la señal de la santa cruz" (By the sign of the holy cross)...making a cross over the face

"de nuestros enemigos",.(from our enemies).making a cross over the chest...and shoulders

"libranos Señor, Dios Nuestro" (free us Lord, Our God)

En el nombre del Padre, el Hijo, y el Espiritu Santo, Amen" (In the name of the Father, the Son, the Holy Spirit, Amen). ...Regular sign of the cross.

We will take a hand and make a small cross using a thumb and index finger and kiss it at the end.

It seems an acceptable way to do this, and I've even seen it taught in books as the correct way to make the sign of the cross here. They even teach it to children, in books.

It's how it's done here.


#7

I always kiss my fingers after making the sign of the cross. I was raised in Italy and it is common and I guess it is like blowing god a kiss.:) I never even thought anyone would watch me and question it.


#8

As others have said I think it's a Mediterranean/Latin American thing.


#9

[quote="ClearWater, post:6, topic:345864"]
Yes, I learned to do it that way.

We say, "Por la señal de la santa cruz" (By the sign of the holy cross)...making a cross over the face

"de nuestros enemigos",.(from our enemies).making a cross over the chest...and shoulders

"libranos Señor, Dios Nuestro" (free us Lord, Our God)

En el nombre del Padre, el Hijo, y el Espiritu Santo, Amen" (In the name of the Father, the Son, the Holy Spirit, Amen). ...Regular sign of the cross.

We will take a hand and make a small cross using a thumb and index finger and kiss it at the end.

It seems an acceptable way to do this, and I've even seen it taught in books as the correct way to make the sign of the cross here. They even teach it to children, in books.

It's how it's done here.

[/quote]

I wondered about this. Thanks!!!

-Tim-


#10

[quote="ClearWater, post:6, topic:345864"]
Yes, I learned to do it that way.

We say, "Por la señal de la santa cruz" (By the sign of the holy cross)...making a cross over the face

"de nuestros enemigos",.(from our enemies).making a cross over the chest...and shoulders

"libranos Señor, Dios Nuestro" (free us Lord, Our God)

En el nombre del Padre, el Hijo, y el Espiritu Santo, Amen" (In the name of the Father, the Son, the Holy Spirit, Amen). ...Regular sign of the cross.

We will take a hand and make a small cross using a thumb and index finger and kiss it at the end.

It seems an acceptable way to do this, and I've even seen it taught in books as the correct way to make the sign of the cross here. They even teach it to children, in books.

It's how it's done here.

[/quote]

That sounds familiar to the sign(s) I was taught to do during Gospel reading with a mental prayer.

May the Gospel be on my mind sotc with thumb on forehead,
On my lips sign on lips
And in my heart sotc on chest with thumb.


#11

I am currently away from home on business and don't have access to my library so I can't quote precisely. Pope Innocent III (?) instructed the faithful in the sign of the cross. Using the right hand, place the tips of the thumb and first two fingers together (reminding us of the Trinity) and the tips of the remaining fingers to the palm (reminding us of the two natures of Christ) touch the forehead, breast, right shoulder and left shoulder with the three joined fingers of the right hand while saying the prayer. End by kissing the joined finger tips symbolizing our love of God.
Note the the sign of the cross is not properly a prayer but a dedication of actions. It is said prior to and/or following some activity. By doing this we make our daily works a prayer offered to God. The sign of the cross reminds us to do everything as an offering to God. It also fulfills the scripture which says "Their prayer is the work of their hands." (Sirach 38, RSVCE)

Reb Levi


#12

[quote="drafdog, post:11, topic:345864"]
I am currently away from home on business and don't have access to my library so I can't quote precisely. Pope Innocent III (?) instructed the faithful in the sign of the cross. Using the right hand, place the tips of the thumb and first two fingers together (reminding us of the Trinity) and the tips of the remaining fingers to the palm (reminding us of the two natures of Christ) touch the forehead, breast, right shoulder and left shoulder with the three joined fingers of the right hand while saying the prayer. End by kissing the joined finger tips symbolizing our love of God.
Note the the sign of the cross is not properly a prayer but a dedication of actions. It is said prior to and/or following some activity. By doing this we make our daily works a prayer offered to God. The sign of the cross reminds us to do everything as an offering to God. It also fulfills the scripture which says "Their prayer is the work of their hands." (Sirach 38, RSVCE)

Reb Levi

[/quote]

You are absolutely right, without being aware of it I make the sign of the cross exactly as taught by Pope Innocent III. I guess that makes me traditionalist;)

There's an interesting article on this topic on the following site.
catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0129.html


#13

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.