kneeling during consecration

I have recently come into a large quandry. The music team at my parish doesn’t wish to kneel during the consecration. They feel that they have other jobs to do such as leading the congregation in song. Does this exempt them from kneeling during consecration. I find this unsettling at best. I would love some text to clear this up.

Ditto that request. It’s probably been answered on here and I’ll look it up shortly. The choir I now sing for does not kneel either, and it disturbs me greatly.

the way our church was laid out before renovations it was impossible for the choir to kneel. They requested, and got, new chairs, that have kneelers on the back, but still offer flexibility of arrangement, so that they can kneel. They also worked on the positions of the mikes so the cantor can get up and lead the mystery of faith, and get up in time for the Amen etc. Before it was too awkward.

There should not be any music or singing during the Consecration, so they should be kneeling also.

For the record, there is such thing as reverent standing. For example, in the Maronite rite, there is no such thing as kneeling as a part of the Divine Liturgy: during the Consecration, everyone stands. In the Chaldean rite, there is no prescribed position, but most Chaldean masses I have been too, everyone kneels, except in the ones I have seen on TV where His Beatitude Mar Emmanuel III Delly Chaldean Patriarch of Babylon celebrates mass, everyone seems to stand there (perhaps due to lack of space?).

God Bless

I belong to a TLM parish.

Many times we have a very long “Sanctus” that will not finish until after the consecration. In this case the choir will stop singing the Sanctus just before the priest begins the consecration. They will then all kneel until after the consecration of the chalice. After the consecration they stand and finish the Sanctus. (Note the Canon or “Eucharistic prayer” in the TLM is done in silence - just a side note here)

In the Novus Ordo you have the “Memorial Acclamation” at that time our choir continues the Sanctus I have noticed… so if our choir can kneel, so can yours… and our choir is not out on display the way many Novus Ordo parish choirs are- what a great expression of the Catholic faith if they were all to kneel for everyone to see at that moment.

Ken

Depends on the situation.

Some areas where the choir sings, quarters are too tight for kneeling, so standing would be appropriate.

Jim


Guess I am getting forgetful in my old age but I can’t seem to remember the priest continuing to chant thru the Eucharistic Prayer to include the Consecration - it seems to me that the
words were spoken. A particular parish priest that seems to do many things with “self expression” chanted throughout and I
found it distracting and questionable. Fortunately I have a
great parish to belong to (if it had the Latin Mass it would be the world’s greatest) so I only attended this closer church because I couldn’t get to St Agnes which requires a 40 mile drive each way.

Got an answer for me? Thanks!

smileycentral.com/sig.jsp?pc=ZSzeb095&pp=ZN

This what the USCCB adaptations for the GIRM state:

This adaptation will be inserted at number 43, paragraph 3:

In the dioceses of the United States of America, they should kneel beginning after the singing or recitation of the Sanctus until after the Amen of the Eucharistic Prayer, except when prevented on occasion by reasons of health, lack of space, the large number of people present, or some other good reason. Those who do not kneel ought to make a profound bow when the priest genuflects after the consecration. The faithful kneel after the Agnus Dei unless the Diocesan Bishop determines otherwise.

usccb.org/liturgy/girm/fil2.shtml

Don’t forget, the Church has common sense.

In my choir loft, there are no kneelers, space is tight, and the choir is preparing for the next musical moment. Kneeling is just not practical or, really, even possible, especially in the cases of our members with bad knees.

I submit that all of these are the “good reason” (s) referred to in the document cited.

Now, maybe in other circumstances the choir can kneel. If that’s a possibility, then, yes, go for it.

But I wouldn’t worry if circumstances prevent. You’re not committing some grave sin.

This is the case at my parish. The cantor kneels along with the rest of us.

Kneeling during the Consecration is essential. Realistically, only a medical problem, a serious one, would be enough to prevent someone from kneeling. Kneeling has during the Consecration has been the norm since 1201 A.D. in the Roman Rite. As the previous poster quoted:

This adaptation will be inserted at number 43, paragraph 3:

In the dioceses of the United States of America, they should kneel beginning after the singing or recitation of the Sanctus until after the Amen of the Eucharistic Prayer, except when prevented on occasion by reasons of health, lack of space, the large number of people present, or some other good reason. Those who do not kneel ought to make a profound bow when the priest genuflects after the consecration. The faithful kneel after the Agnus Dei unless the Diocesan Bishop determines otherwise.

usccb.org/liturgy/girm/fil2.shtml

Even if there is no kneeler, I ask you to kneel. I have had to kneel on the concrete floor before when kneelers were not present. Why? Because Jesus Christ, the Son of God, comes to us. Bread and Wine become Jesus Christ. This is the Greatest Miracle on Earth. There should be no singing at this time - none. All should kneel in Adoration for the Paschal Lamb. Remember, the Mass truly is the Sacrifice of Calvary.

Except when the GIRM allows otherwise for “good reasons”.

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