Knights of Columbus

Can someone discerning religious life join the Knights of Columbus?

If so, what will happen to there membership once they join an order like the Capuchin order for example?

I assume so. I spent a year in seminary, and most of the men were Knights. If men who are discerning the priesthood can be Knights, I don’t see why men discerning the religious life can’t.

As for what happens after you’re professed, you might be invited to be the Council’s chaplain. Of course, if you join a cloistered order, it’s not likely that you’d be able to make it to the meetings.

My guess is that it would depend on the Order/Congregation (ie. you should ask them).

All the religious priests at our College are Knights for example.

Most religious brothers are not priests. One must be in holy orders to be a chaplain.

The answer to your question is a most definite "yes!" I am a founding member of the Knights of Columbus, St. Sebastian Council, Pittsburgh, PA. Although the chaplain is required to be an ordained priest, we currently have two active members who are local seminarians.

So please, do not miss the opportunity to join a local council and become active in service to your fellow man.

Yes a person that is discerning joining a religious Order can join the Knights of Columbus. There is nothing baring that. As long as you pay your annual membership dues you will continue to be a member. However if you do join a religious Order they will have the ultimate say in what meetings outside of your Order you are allowed to attend. You can request to go to certain meetings but your superior can so no for a number of reasons. It may conflict with important community times. It may interfere with an outreach or some other thing going on in the Order. Under obedience you will have to obey them.

Go ahead and join, especially since you are still in a stage of discernment. If you were farther along I would suggest talking to the superior of the Order to which you are discerning membership.

My group has an abbot and several brothers, so I'd say yes.

Yes, it's fine - don't worry. I am a Knight and I am sure of this.

I am a third degree knight and in our council we have several priests, deacons and seminarians. There is no conflict and in fact each discipline compliments the other.

True, but the poster was asking specifically about a member of a religious order.

I went through the Fourth Degree Exemplification with an Abbott of a Trappist Monastery. Pretty neat.
Plus Religious and maybe seminarians get a free membership. ie no dues.

The K of C certainly welcome seminarians, diocesan and regular priests as well as religious brothers. The K of C requires that chaplains be ordained.

As to whether or not the religious can be a Knight, that depends on his superior. He must have permission, which is not the case with a diocesan priest, since they are not consecrated men. Therefore, they do not vow obedience. Most religious superiors that I know have great respect and affection for the K of C. It’s not difficult to get permission.

Not always. There are many religious brothers who are chaplains. The requirements depend on the needs of the organization doing the contracting. In my community we have two that are hospital chaplains. When anointing or confession are needed, they simply contact the patient’s parish priest. They do all of the counseling, take communion to the sick, do spiritual direction and they also serve as the moral conscience of the healthcare team. There are many duties to a chaplaincy beyond confession and mass.

In the case of the K of C, they don’t need much more than confession and mass. It makes sense that they require ordained chaplains. They get all of the other services from their home parish.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:

My council has two priests as members, one being our chaplain. Many (or most) councils support seminarians financially during their studies.

[quote="JReducation, post:12, topic:274416"]
Not always. There are many religious brothers who are chaplains. The requirements depend on the needs of the organization doing the contracting. In my community we have two that are hospital chaplains. When anointing or confession are needed, they simply contact the patient's parish priest. They do all of the counseling, take communion to the sick, do spiritual direction and they also serve as the moral conscience of the healthcare team. There are many duties to a chaplaincy beyond confession and mass.

In the case of the K of C, they don't need much more than confession and mass. It makes sense that they require ordained chaplains. They get all of the other services from their home parish.

[/quote]

That is what we were discussing, K of C chaplains, not hospital chaplains. My comment referred to the K of C in this context.

[quote="Chatter163, post:10, topic:274416"]
True, but the poster was asking specifically about a member of a religious order.

[/quote]

And why would that be different from all the clergy I mentioned?

Nowhere in your post did you mention “priests, deacons and seminarians” as being part of a religious order. Most clerics are secular clergy.

[quote="Chatter163, post:16, topic:274416"]
Nowhere in your post did you mention "priests, deacons and seminarians" as being part of a religious order. Most clerics are secular clergy.

[/quote]

As is so happens our priests are part of a religious order so that distinction didn't come to mind, I do get the source of the question though.

[quote="Bob_Aliano, post:15, topic:274416"]
And why would that be different from all the clergy I mentioned?

[/quote]

About 70% of priests and about 99% of deacons are secular Catholics. They are not religious.

Priests who are religious are in a whole different category. They are not secular men. They are consecrated men, not because they're priests, but because they're in vows. There are two vows that come into play here that diocesan priests do not make: obedience and chastity.

Through the vow of obedience, the religious gives us his will, desires, wishes, aspirations and lays his life in the hands of the superior and of his brothers. The promise of obedience that secular deacons and priests make only requires them to obey the bishop's policies. The bishop has no say in their other activities.

Through the vow of chastity, the religious no only promises to be celibate, bur he also commits himself to the common life. The diocesan deacon and priest makes a promise of celibacy, which is a promise never to marry. There is no commitment to community. He has time and freedom to do what he wants.

It's not the K of C who set the rules for the chaplains. They only define their needs. The superior, if the man is a religious, is the one who decides whether or not his brother will be a member of the Knights.

In the case of the secular clergy, this is not necessary. They do not have to get permission from the bishop. He just needs to be informed.

The priest who is a religious is a religious first and a priest second, that's the difference.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)

We have the Disciples of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary as our clergy, I believe they are a Religious Order.

You have many consecrated religious in the K of C. The point was that they can only join with the permission of their superior, whereas a secular priest does not need to ask for permission to join the K of C. He HAS to inform his bishop. Informing is not the same as saying, “May I?”

Religious superiors look kindly toward the Knights. It’s an easy permission to get. To the best of my knowledge, the Knights have never been heretics or wild. There are some individual Knights that a tittering on being excommunicated, but that’s not the whole order. The order is very Catholic.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:

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