Kosher Boat

Hello Catholics,

I’m probably about to ask a rather obvious question that I don’t know simply because I lack the experience in your faith. Why don’t Catholics keep kosher? For that matter, why don’t they keep the 613 laws that pre-existed the Christian faith? I’ve heard Jesus (aka Yeshua) was Jewish; therefore, he must have kept the laws. If Christians are to be Christ-like, why not follow the 613.

This is related to specifically kosher foods, but also towards tattoos, pre-marital sex, and various other 'thou-shalt-not’s.

Sincerely,
Your Jewish Neighbor

I don’t know the place where you can find it in the bible, nor am I 100% sure that I am correct so fellow catholics correct me if I am wrong. But I believe that when Jesus came He appointed rules that we should follow such as love one another as yourself, thus making the old laws obsolete. I would also like to point out that Jesus did not actually follow Jewish laws all the time, again I don’t know exact scripture but there were times when He didn’t wash His hands before meals. Sorry if I am off on anything but that is just my take on it.

I don’t know the place where you can find it in the bible, nor am I 100% sure that I am correct so fellow Catholics correct me if I am wrong. But I believe that when Jesus came He appointed rules that we should follow such as love one another as yourself, thus making the old laws obsolete. I would also like to point out that Jesus did not actually follow Jewish laws all the time, again I don’t know exact scripture but there were times when He didn’t wash His hands before meals. Sorry if I am off on anything but that is just my take on it.

As I understand it, Jesus gave us a new convent in His blood - and we are no longer to keep the ceremonial laws that marked God’s people.

jesus brought a new and better covenant. for all people. God made it clear to peter that he could eat anything and with anyone.

Christians, including Catholics, do keep several of the 613 mitzvot, which is best translated and understood as “connections to G-d,” some of which surpass logic. (Translations such as commandments, laws, or good deeds are really incomplete.) The connections to G-d that Christians keep involve certain of the moral mitzvot, including one that you mentioned: not engaging in premarital sex. However, most of the more ritual mitzvot–which surpass logic–are believed to have been fulfilled by Jesus and His redemptive sacrifice, so they need not be maintained in their literal form. Further, it is not required for any non-Jews to keep all of the 613 mitzvot except for the seven Noachide Laws; nor Jews, for that matter, since many of the mitzvot cannot currently be maintained due to the destruction of the Temple, and will not be reenacted until the reconstruction of the Temple according to the Renewed Covenant.

In Acts 10:9 on, Peter is told in a vision to kill and eat. He says he can’t, but the Lord tells him three times. I think this released Christians from the strict dietary laws.

The Ethiopian Orthodox are the closest of all Christians to keeping kosher diet, though they do mix meat and dairy unlike Jews. They also observe the Sabbath, in addition to Sunday. These are ancient practices in their church, rooted in the traditional belief that their kings descended from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. So they have strongly Hebrew characteristics in their church, and do not eat pork or apparently the other animals considered unclean in Leviticus: guardian.co.tt/news/2011/04/21/ethiopian-holy-week-clashes-christians

They also keep the Sabbath as a day of worship, in addition to Sunday as the rest of the Christian world also does.

My church, the Coptic church, which is the mother church of the Ethiopian church, does not keep the exact same dietary rules as the Ethiopians (since we were not followers of Judaism, but mostly gentiles until our father St. Mark came), but it is also not very popular to eat pork among Copts, mainly for cultural reasons. It is not considered forbidden for us, but some of our popes have argued against eating it (like Pope Shenouda, who was pope before our current Pope, Tawadros). This does not really make a big problem for us, anyway, because we fast from all meat and dairy for almost the entire year thanks to the fasts in our church (both the Egyptians and the Ethiopians have the same liturgical calendar, so we all fast together in this way).

So some Christians are close to what you are asking, but none will be exactly like the Jews because we are not Jews. Our Lord Jesus Christ told us that what comes out of our mouths is most important.

anyone know what percent of jewish people in the u.s. keep the dietary laws anymore? no one in my circle of acquaintances.

As was stated, it has to do with how Jesus established His covenant. He specifically addressed the Jewish laws, including the dietary ones. He also released us from the circumcision requirement. Since the apostles were sent to convert gentiles as well, this would make things much easier for these new converts. It all makes sense, when you think about it.

That being said, some of the laws were quite intelligent. Keeping meat and dairy separate from fruits and vegetables, especially before refrigeration, probably helped prevent illness. Not consuming pork may have a scientific basis, before the time of Jesus, due to certain zoonotic diseases that were common in pigs, such as trichinosis. Trichinosis is caused by a nematode parasite and can infect the brain in humans. It is still the number one cause of seizures in Mexico, due to the consumption of under-cooked pork. Of course, if the pork is cooked properly, it isn’t an issue.

Estimates run from about 15 to 20 percent. But this is tricky because the level or degree of maintaining kashrut varies between more orthodox and less orthodox Jews. It’s not just a matter of refraining from certain foods and combinations of foods, but also preparing foods according to dietary regulations, ensuring kosher dishes and utensils, waiting a certain period of time after eating meat dishes (which varies culturally), and so on.

thank you!:thumbsup:

What do you think when you hear of Christians trying to keep kosher?

If this is too personal, you don’t have to answer but do you keep kosher? Why or why not?

I don’t find it disturbing if Christians want to keep kosher: it’s their prerogative. I do not keep kosher in the way that would pass the test of Orthodox Jews. However, I do refrain from eating certain foods and do not mix meat and dairy products.

Yeah, there are many more reformed Jews now that do not keep kosher. Orthodox Judaism, Hasidic Jews that is abstain from pork and other forbidden foods/mixtures, but you make a valid point that not many of us follow all of our laws. I’m asking for scriptural or cultural explanations for why the Catholic did away with kosher.

i think you got them, yes?

If you enjoy a good laugh every now and then, the following video explains the distinction that most modern Christians make between Ceremonial and Moral Law (Hebrew Catholics, Jews for Jesus, etc. obviously excluded). Viewers be warned, this video was made as a response to angry Internet trolls, not kind people on forums seeking to understand another religion. :slight_smile: Hopefully it’s entertaining and informative.

The lesson begins at 1:55. youtu.be/4r2m_cffRjI

They have no problem obeying the Leviticus exhortation about homosexuality but seem to cheerfully ignore the rest it’s often puzzled me

Horus Reads the Internet
Why Christians are no longer bound by Jewish Ceremonial Laws

youtube.com/watch?v=4r2m_cffRjI&feature=youtu.be

Partial Transcript:

Something that is made clear throughout the scriptures is the distinction between the Moral Law and the Ceremonial Law. The Moral Law is the stuff found in the 10 Commandments: things like, “You shall have no other gods”, “Don’t murder”, and “Don’t commit adultery.”

The Ceremonial Law on the other hand is the stuff found primarily in the book of Leviticus that the Israelite people were required to observe: things like, “Don’t eat pork or shellfish” and “Those who engage in homosexual acts must be put to death.”

The Bible also teaches the Moral Law and the Ceremonial Law have two very different purposes. According to Romans 5, for example, the purpose of the Moral Law is to show us our sins so that we can see our need for Christ and his forgiveness. And because all of us are sinners who need to have our sins set before us in order to see our need for Christ, the Moral Law still applies to us today.

According to Exodus 19, the Ceremonial Law is quite different. The purpose of the Ceremonial Law was to mark the Israelites as the people from whom the Messiah was going to come. In other words, the Ceremonial Law formed the way the Israelites worshipped, dressed, ate, worked and practiced justice, this was God’s way of reminding the Israelites that the savior of the world would come from them. And so, when that savior finally came in the person of Jesus, the purpose of the Ceremonial Law had been fulfilled. So, in the same way that you don’t need to hang up flyers for a concert once the concert is over, after Jesus died and rose again, it was no longer necessary to follow the Ceremonial Law.

This is why in the Book of Acts, Chapter 10, God tells Peter that all of the animals are now considered clean and that the Gentiles who didn’t follow the Ceremonial Law were welcomed into the Christian faith. So, the reason that Christians can eat pork and shellfish isn’t because we don’t take our faith seriously, it’s because we take our faith so seriously that we’ve actually read the Bible, and the Bible tells us that we are now free to eat these things.

Yes. My cousin knows someone who owns and operates a kosher Chinese restaurant. A rabbi visits every so often to certify it as kosher. I don’t know what city it is in.

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