Kosher Cooking Info Request -- Please!

Shalom!

This are questions for my Jewish brothers and sisters because I have a very dear long-time Jewish friend (who is getting older – thanks G*d – and forgetting a little) who keeps Kosher and for whom I would love to cook more. However, I want to make sure I do things “correctly”. :slight_smile:

  1. Are all new pots and pans Kosher?
    1a) . . . or do they have to be blessed (is that the word?) in a body of water or the special pond at the Temple?
    1b) Must the pot/pan be made of a specific material?
  2. Is glass always Kosher? That is, if a glass (those see through yellowish stove-top/oven pots) is used to roast meat, may it be used as a pareve pot later? I.e., to cook tomato sauce or would the tomato sauce then be “meat” instead of pareve? I want pareve tomato sauce so that she may have it with meats or with manicotti or stuffed shells.
  3. What are cooking knives considered? If they have cut meats while cold, are they now “meat”?
    3a) What if the meat is hot?
  4. I think have read something about a Kosher-keeping Jew may eat cold items at a non-Kosher restaurant. For example, ice cream, tuna salad, etc. Is that correct?
  5. To keep a brand new Boston bean pot pareve, what are the rules must I follow with the mixing spoon/ladle that I may use to mix ingredients in it?
    5a) May I use the bean pot in my oven or must it be their Kosher oven?
  6. May a regular oven be Koshered? If so how? I already know how to Kosherize a microwave.
  7. Are glass liquids/fluid\s measuring cups pareve?
  8. May I use parchment paper (unbleached, silicone coated) on the bottom of my bread pan for Date Nut breads, etc.? I use butter (or coconut oil if another person is lactose intolerant) and then dust it with a cinnamon-sugar mix I make.
  9. How are cooking items made Kosher? I heard something about burying them; if so, for how long? :confused:
  10. Are only specific wines Kosher? I think if I buy a bottle of wine, it must be brought over uncorked/unopened so that the Kosher-keeping person (or does the person only needs to be Jewish?) may open the bottle. Then that person is to have “custody” of it. Is that correct?
  11. Are hard liquor Kosher? I’d like to make some nice extracts such as lime, orange, etc., for my friend. Am thinking of using vodka and a little rum, would that be all right?

Am careful about mixing Kosher meats and milk (at my Friend’s home for I do not have Kosher meat pans/pots), and of course, would not cook anything with shell fish, etc. Any other information I should have in order to cook Kosher for my Friend? I kid around with my Jewish friends and tell them my body is Jewish because I appear to have an allergy to pork and shell fish! :thumbsup: The only part of the pork I may eat are the feet! :shrug:

Obviously I do not keep a Kosher kitchen, but I do have some separate items as milk or as pareve (I wash them by hand with the “proper sponge” (it is not a sponge, but I do not know what to call it)). I simply wan to make sure am not overcomplicating this and to see what else I can do to help my friend. At times I feel overwhelmed with the technicalities :o :blush:! The word use might not be correct, but I hope you may tell that the love is there. :love:

You may PM me if you wish. Thank you for your help! Happy Hanukkah!

Luz Maria

And don’t have too much funnaka!!!

I don’t know the answer for your questions, being a “goy”, however, I’m curious about the answers!

ICXC NIKA

As a Christian Jew I only follow some of the oral Torah , but i will try to help you where I can

  1. Only some should be
    2.you can use it to cook tomato sauce
  2. Sounds right
    5a Use theirs , maybe if they are humanistic or reform they are more lax on that .
  3. You can kosherize your oven , but that would require disassembly and reassembling the oven and cleaning it
  4. Only wines made by Jews are kosher , However some say it’s kosher if in the possession of observant Jews , but this also varies.
  5. Liquor is kosher
    As for separating meats and milk , also remember that this includes any dairy products

Hope that helps , keep the faith , and Happy Chanukah
Starwars

If you make a mistake they will most likely forgive ya , good luck :thumbsup:

I have Orthodox Jewish neighbors that I’d like to cook for so I’ve done some research from a Non-jewish point of view - and it’s a really blessing you’re doing for your friend, and I can tell from your questions you’ve also given it much thought.

1st thing: determine how exactly Kosher your friend expects their food.

Some of my Jewish friends adhere to ‘mostly kosher’ and just don’t eat disgusting things, pork, shellfish, or where milk products touch meat.

My neighbors are Orthodox - and for some foods, I can’t even prepare them without having a Jewish person do some of the things like put the item into the oven. You’ll also need to figure out if you’re cooking exclusivly meat or dairy ( but not both with the same equipment) - never the twain shall they meet, and indeed some preparation items will need to be washed in a Mikveh. I can’t even serve them a bottle of Kosher wine, as having an non-Jew open and serve would diminish it.

So without knowing how Koser their requirements exactly are - you can run the gamut from ‘easy to hard’ and it would be hard for our Jewish friends here to give specific advice.

But, but, but, that’s what we have the most of!

Thank you for your help. I know I’d be forgiven if I make a mistake for we’ve been Friends for . . . many years.

We are going to try making those Latkes with egg whites! I tell you, they are GREAT Friends!

Thank you! Happy Hanukkah to you too!

Luz Maria

Thank you, BenJohnson! It is great that you also have an Orthodox Jew for a neighbor. I tell you, Jewish food is GREAT! Am doing a mitzvah but it is with loads of love:hug3:, so it is easy!:thumbsup: Oh, yes! I have thought about this for a while. My friend has taught me quite a bit throughout the years, but . . . is getting older (thank G*d!:extrahappy:–happy to have my Friend around!) and I can tell forgetting a little. I want to help and do not want to cause any stress!

My Friend: oh, really Kosher for sure and not “mostly Kosher”! With three sets of everything! I must remember where each set is kept when I go over! We go to the Temple and I have been taught what I cannot do over there, e.g.*, *shake hands/touch a male from the age of seven up (am always shaking hands). The first time at the Temple, everything went well until I washed my hands in the restroom and turned on the hot water :o:blush:; however, it was winter and everyone enjoyed the warm water. I then shot it off before leaving. I learned :curtsey:.

At times I prep things at my home up to the point where I need a Kosher prep item or pot and then bring it over and we finish it together at the Kosher home. Other times I buy the stuff and bring it over so that it is not even in a non-Kosher kitchen. Oh yes, the whole meal is ether meat or milk – like stuffed shells with a salad, etc., and one of my sweet breads (has milk in it) as dessert with a cup of coffee (with cream for me if it is a milk meal - no cream otherwise). Delish and Kosher!

. . . and indeed some preparation items will need to be washed in a Mikveh.

There must be a prayer that is said when doing this, right? May a gentile say it? Is it in Hebrew? I guess a gentile may not do this, but it is a guess.

I can’t even serve them a bottle of Kosher wine, as having an non-Jew open and serve would diminish it

I know; however, I do not think we (gentiles) diminish it. It is just that we are not Jewish. I relate it to the Catholic things we do (like receiving Communion) that a non-Catholic (even if Christian) may not do. It is fine. I enjoy the wine no matter who pours it ;).

It was certainly not my intention to put our Jewish friends at CAF on the spot or give a hard time. I am only a gentile trying to help and be a blessing to an Orthodox Jewish Friend.

Thank you for helping me and for helping your Orthodox neighbor. May G*d reward you a thousand fold. May Our Lord bless you and keep you. May His Face shine upon you and give you strength.

Luz Maria

What a great mitzvah. As I started answering these questions I realized you should really get ahold of a (kosher-observant…) rabbi for the more specific ones or if something comes up! Using www.chabad.org I’m 99% sure you can find a rabbi local to you. (Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with Chabad.)

  1. Are only specific wines Kosher? A wine absolutely has to have a reliable kosher symbol on the label. Here is a list of ones many people consider reliable: kosherquest.org/kosher-symbols/ Note that many kosher wines are imported from Israel.I think if I buy a bottle of wine, it must be brought over uncorked/unopened so that the Kosher-keeping person (or does the person only needs to be Jewish?) may open the bottle. Then that person is to have “custody” of it. Is that correct? The Jewish person should open and pour the wine. It shouldn’t be handled, once opened, by the non-Jew. If the label says the word “mevushal” on it then it may be opened, poured and handled by a non-Jew as well with no problem.
  2. Are hard liquor Kosher? I’d like to make some nice extracts such as lime, orange, etc., for my friend. Am thinking of using vodka and a little rum, would that be all right?
    Most Vodka and some rums are fine. Here is a VERY extensive list of acceptable alcoholic beverages: crcweb.org/LiquorList.pdf

Am careful about mixing Kosher meats and milk (at my Friend’s home for I do not have Kosher meat pans/pots), and of course, would not cook anything with shell fish, etc. Any other information I should have in order to cook Kosher for my Friend? I kid around with my Jewish friends and tell them my body is Jewish because I appear to have an allergy to pork and shell fish! :thumbsup: The only part of the pork I may eat are the feet! :shrug:
**Meat has to have a reliable kosher symbol on it. Fish must be verified from a kosher species. All seafood besides fish is NOT kosher, and even some fish (e.g. catfish, swordfish) is not kosher. Meat and milk implements should not be washed together or put together with hot water. If they are wet they should preferably not be stacked on each other. Can’t think of anything else off the top of my head! **

Obviously I do not keep a Kosher kitchen, but I do have some separate items as milk or as pareve (I wash them by hand with the “proper sponge” (it is not a sponge, but I do not know what to call it)). I simply wan to make sure am not overcomplicating this and to see what else I can do to help my friend. At times I feel overwhelmed with the technicalities :o :blush:!

Don’t blush. Kosher laws are vastly more complicated than any other dietary system in the world. Rabbis study years to master the laws and one of their main jobs is answering questions about pots & pans! Kudos for trying to help your friend.

The word use might not be correct, but I hope you may tell that the love is there. :love:

You may PM me if you wish. Thank you for your help! Happy Hanukkah!
thanks!

Luz Maria

Moshe

Just to bring more joy to your life - don’t forget about fruit and vegetables.

Another poster pointed out the chabad.org site - there’s good info there, but the other recommendation to talk to your friends Rabbi would be best.

There’s some amusing workarounds we’ve done - the prep items I use are owned by my neighbor - I can’t own them or they need to go back to the Mikva. When they were immersed, there seemed to be a small blessing (or some ritual) involved. I know no Hebrew, so I can’t really offer any advice.

The only rule that sort of bugs me is the wine rule - but I we understand that the dinner table is almost like an alter or a ritual space then it doesn’t trouble me and I settle down.

It was certainly not my intention to put our Jewish friends at CAF on the spot or give a hard time. I am only a gentile trying to help and be a blessing to an Orthodox Jewish Friend.

I don’t think your post came across as anything but kind and inquisitive!

Thank you for helping me and for helping your Orthodox neighbor. May G*d reward you a thousand fold. May Our Lord bless you and keep you. May His Face shine upon you and give you strength.

Luz Maria

Thank you for being a good example of trying to work through in the command to ‘love your neighbor’ - I can say without a doubt that my Jewish friends and neighbors have been a blessing to me and my family, not only as good friends but good examples of faith, generosity, caring, and a determination to life according to G-d’s desires and not our own.

Awesome point Kaninchen, very important. Eating insects is actually worse according to the Torah than pork because there the prohibition is repeat five times throughout the Torah.

Oh thank you, thank you, thank you! WOW! So sorry I could not reply yesterday! Thank you about the mitzvah; we have been Friends for a very long time.

I did check the Chabad website and found a few near me. I feel . . . shall I say, strange calling a Rabbi about pots and pans. Would the Rebbetzin be able to help? Does she do this kind of help? Would that be proper? I know that my Friend’s Rabbi’s Rebbetzin helps quite a bit in the Temple’s kitchen. Cultures are funny because when we first came to the States (before cell phones and GPS), we got lost (on the road that is ;)) and sought a Rectory (Priests’ house usually next to the church) to ask for directions. Well . . . you should have seen his face when we asked him for directions! **:bigyikes: **We were so surprised at his reaction that we went away with out the directions!:rotfl: We found a mail. . .carrier because there was no police in sight! We knew we were in the area and we were looking for some kind of a monastery. Priests usually know.

Here are my questions to your reply to certain items in blue. Am not trying to be difficult.

1a) . . . or do they have to be blessed (is that the word?) in a body of water or the special pond at the Temple? **If you own them, they do not have to be immersed in a ritual bath (mikveh). If a Jew owns them, they need to be immersed by a Jewish person and a blessing is recited upon doing that. **Yes I do own them – and do keep them as milk or “pareve”. I relate “areve” to neutral and food cooked in it may be eaten with (Kosher) meats or milk items. I wash them separately and keep them so.
2) Is glass always Kosher? That is, if a glass (those see through yellowish stove-top/oven pots) is used to roast meat, may it be used as a pareve pot later? I.e., to cook tomato sauce or would the tomato sauce then be “meat” instead of pareve? **This is really two questions in one. If glass is used to roast meat, it should not be used to cook dairy. This is standard contemporary practice, although you might find a rabbi who will say it could be done. Secondly, anything cooked in any meat pot, as long as it’s CLEAN, is parve - with an important exception, that it should not be eaten mixed with dairy. So, one could eat the parve thing and have dairy right afterwards (unlike if it were meat), but not mix it with cheese and noodles. In that case you would need to cook it in a dedicated parve vessel (or dairy). **I thought noodles without a milk ingredient were pareve. Was I wrong? Am not “talking” about Passover time. That is another whole million dollars! No disrespect intended, I just know what my Friend goes through preparing.
3) What are cooking knives considered? If they have cut meats while cold, are they now “meat”? **Yes, if you slice even cold meat with them they should be considered meat. **All right. I had bought a new knife (and cutting board) to cut fruits, etc., I’ll keep it/them for those items.
4) I think have read something about a Kosher-keeping Jew may eat cold items at a non-Kosher restaurant. For example, ice cream, tuna salad, etc. Is that correct? **Not really. In specific circumstances it could be done but this is complicated. Definitely no prepared foods. **Sorry, English is my second language, what is prepared food? Is it the same as cooked? Tuna salad is prepared, but not cooked.One time I went into a Ben & Jerry’s and was able to order ice cream after the server lifted the commercial container out of the freezer to show me the kosher certification on the packaging. I understand.
5) To keep a brand new Boston bean pot pareve, what are the rules must I follow with the mixing spoon/ladle that I may use to mix ingredients in it? **You can use any ladle as long as it’s CLEAN. Don’t use a knife as a mixing implement in a pinch! **The ladle must be pareve and not one I have used for my non-Kosher chicken soup (am not putting meats in the baked beans - unless my Friend wants it and which, of course, would be Kosher). I looked at the Molasses’ label and it is Kosher.:slight_smile:
5a) May I use the bean pot in my oven or must it be their Kosher oven? **kosher oven only. **I’ll bring the bean pot over with the soaked beans (yes in a new container). Who knows, maybe my Friend will want me to bring the baked beans to Temple (we’d go together and I would carry it) to share with everyone. It would be made all from scratch.
6) May a regular oven be Koshered? If so how? I already know how to Kosherize a microwave. Yes. Only practical way for you to do it is if your oven has self-clean. Clean it well with a detergent and then r****un the self-clean cycle, and you will have a kosher oven. Doesn’t work for stovetop. Then what are stovetops? :confused:
9) How are cooking items made Kosher? I heard something about burying them; if so, for how long? :confused: **No such thing. They have to be “kashered” or “kosherized” and this is very technical in Jewish law. Not recommended. **That burying thing did not sound “right”, but what do I know?:hmmm:

Continued…

  1. Are only specific wines Kosher? **A wine absolutely has to have a reliable kosher symbol on the label. Here is a list of ones many people consider reliable: kosherquest.org/kosher-symbols/ Note that many kosher wines are imported from Israel. **I think if I buy a bottle of wine, it must be brought over uncorked/unopened so that the Kosher-keeping person (or does the person only needs to be Jewish?) may open the bottle. Then that person is to have “custody” of it. Is that correct? **The Jewish person should open and pour the wine. It shouldn’t be handled, once opened, by the non-Jew. If the label says the word “mevushal” on it then it may be opened, poured and handled by a non-Jew as well with no problem. **Very informative. Thank you.
  2. Are hard liquor Kosher? I’d like to make some nice extracts such as lime, orange, etc., for my friend. Am thinking of using vodka and a little rum, would that be all right?
    Most Vodka and some rums are fine. Here is a VERY extensive list of acceptable alcoholic beverages: crcweb.org/LiquorList.pdf Oh wow! You should have seen me with the bottle of Vodka and Rum to see if they are Kosher! I think I gave Our Lord a laugh! They are, by the way.

Am careful about mixing Kosher meats and milk (at my Friend’s home for I do not have Kosher meat pans/pots), and of course, would not cook anything with shell fish, etc. Any other information I should have in order to cook Kosher for my Friend? I kid around with my Jewish friends and tell them my body is Jewish because I appear to have an allergy to pork and shell fish! :thumbsup: The only part of the pork I may eat are the feet! :shrug:
**Meat has to have a reliable kosher symbol on it. Fish must be verified from a kosher species. All seafood besides fish is NOT kosher, and even some fish (e.g. catfish, swordfish) is not kosher. **I leave the buying of meat and fish up to my Friend or go to the same Kosher butcher. I do not want to risk it. **Meat and milk implements should not be washed together or put together with hot water. ****If they are wet they should preferably not be stacked on each other. **I already do that. Thank you for the reminder. I will keep doing it.**Can’t think of anything else off the top of my head! **

Obviously I do not keep a Kosher kitchen, but I do have some separate items as milk or as pareve (I wash them by hand with the “proper sponge” (it is not a sponge, but I do not know what to call it)). I simply wan to make sure am not overcomplicating this and to see what else I can do to help my friend. At times I feel overwhelmed with the technicalities :o :blush:!

Don’t blush. Kosher laws are vastly more complicated than any other dietary system in the world. Rabbis study years to master the laws and one of their main jobs is answering questions about pots & pans! Kudos for trying to help your friend. Oh thank you! I feel much better. Well . . . I guess that keeping pots and pans the “correct way” is part of keeping a Kosher kitchen. It is understandable. Oh my Friend has “trained” me well and knows how careful I am about the keeping Kosher. It is just that I noticed a little bit of confusion the last time I asked about “Kosher” in order to bring something. When one has known a person for many years, one knows those little things. I do not want to give more pressure, so I came here.

The word use might not be correct, but I hope you may tell that the love is there. :love:

You may PM me if you wish. Thank you for your help! Happy Hanukkah!
**thanks! **You are mos welcome.

Luz Maria

Thank you again, Moshe! That is another Friend’s (RIP) name! Brings back great memories!

I wish there were more people like you. May G*d reward you a thousand fold for all your help! May you and your loved ones have people who genuinely care for you all your lives.

Luz Maria (given Hebrew name by my Friends: Hannah)

I did not know that! However, I sure do not want insects in my food! To make sure of insect removal in things like broccoli, parsley, etc., I wash swishing them in very salty cold water & then rinse the food with plain water. Apples, fruits, etc.: in 1 cup of water with 1 tablespoon of white vinegar and then rinse off. Is there a Kosher way of doing it or would this suffice?

Thanks again!

The instructions were linked to in my post - just click here.

I do love my Friend who is getting older! Like all of us! :smiley: Yes! I whole heartedly agree . . . the same about my Jewish friends. I learn so much from them, our elder Brothers and Sisters! Have you noticed how well-behaved the children are? They may be children while playing, etc., but come time to pray the Blessing at the meal (specially Friday night) or at Temple and these children are little men and little women – and dressed like little men and little women at Temple. Oh yes! Quite good examples in many ways. My Pastor (Priest in charge of a parish) once asked me where and how I learned to do something and when I told him I learned it from my Jewish friends he told me that, sadly, he was not surprised. It was not in bad tone, but a tone of “I wish we were more like these good Jewish People”.:smiley:

I do not know if I have Jewish neighbors right now. I hope I do.

Thank you for your help, BenJohnson. G*d bless you always.

Luz Maria

Oh my! Thank you! Sorry Kaninchen! How did I miss your post? :o This is really great! You got me going! :smiley: Now am going to look for a similar chart for tropical fruits and vegetables! Am fluent in Spanish, so I’ll look for it in either language.

Thanks again!

I’m not sure how to quote everything including the blue, so I’ll answer here in reference to your earlier posts.
2. They are parve, but there is a special condition that if they were cooked in a milk pot, then they preferably should not be mixed with meat in the same dish - and vice versa with a meat pot. However, if they were already mixed, then the mixture is acceptable. Best to cook in a parve pot.
4. Yes, sorry for not being more clear but tuna salad is in my definition of “prepared” foods. I meant anything that has to be cut, mixed or blended by the eating establishment rather than pure food. Like, you can buy an apple or banana anywhere, obviously. But with tuna salad, as one example, there is no way to know if the mayonnaise in it is kosher-certified or if a non-kosher oil was blended in.
5. Right, no ladle that was used with non-kosher. If the food is cold, you don’t even need to use a parve ladle, just a clean, kosher one. If it is warm then you must use a specifically parve ladle.
6. Stovetop is the gas or electric range where you place frying pans or pots to boil. Making that kosher is much more complicated. The oven, for baking, can be set on self-clean as I said.
9. :slight_smile:

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