LAST RITES

I only recently learned that the sacarment of Extremunction (mispel) has been replaced by the “Blessing of the Sick”. How can they even be the same? One is for the dying, the other for the sick. Did our Holy Father make this change and when did it happen? I am one of the dying but have not yet received this gift but do so want it. Appreciate any and all responses. Thank you.

The sacrament was called “Extreme Unction”. It is now called the “Anointing of the sick”, and Yes it can be given to either some one who is on their death bed or someone who is very sick or in danger of dying, e.g., before a major operation.

Call your parish office and ask for a priest to come to you to be anointed.

[quote=Bob Baran]The sacrament was called “Extreme Unction”. It is now called the “Anointing of the sick”, and Yes it can be given to either some one who is on their death bed or someone who is very sick or in danger of dying, e.g., before a major operation.

Call your parish office and ask for a priest to come to you to be anointed.
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I have received the sacrement of the sick several times, especially before I had cancer surgery, and it was a great comfort to me and to my family. I remember way back when that when the priest came for the last rights, (just like in the movies) everybody had given up hope for the person. But thank God, that has changed. It is now a sacrement of the living as well as the dying.

[quote=KowboyM]I only recently learned that the sacarment of Extremunction (mispel) has been replaced by the “Blessing of the Sick”. How can they even be the same? One is for the dying, the other for the sick. Did our Holy Father make this change and when did it happen? I am one of the dying but have not yet received this gift but do so want it. Appreciate any and all responses. Thank you.
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Not much has really changed with the Sacrament itself. Even back in the pre-Vatican II days the Sacrament was always available to the seriously ill. One did not need to be at the point of death to receive it. The focus was placed wrong. Today it is encouraged that those who are sick, weak or aged receive it. We still have what is refered to as Last Rites for the dying. It is as has always been a trio of three Sacraments. Reconciliation (Confession), Anointing of the Sick and Viaticum (Holy Communion for the journey). Family members should be reminded that they should call a priest when a person is near the point of death, and not to wait too long to do this. Even if the person has received the Anointing of the Sick within the last few weeks, they should still call.

It may also be administered to someone who because of advanced age has compromised health, even though not in danger of death or suffering from a diagnosed disease. It should also be given to a child or youth who has been injured in an accident, or diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening or compromising disease. this includes mental illness.

They just changed the vernacular. The name to something that is more easily understandable to lay people.

[quote=Bill_A]They just changed the vernacular. The name to something that is more easily understandable to lay people.
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Nope not really. Before Vatican II the Sacrament of Extreme Unction forgave all mortal sins but today it doesn’t. This is a huge change

[quote=katolik]Nope not really. Before Vatican II the Sacrament of Extreme Unction forgave all mortal sins but today it doesn’t. This is a huge change
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That is incorrect. The Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick always forgives all sins for anyone incapable of receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation,(such as being unconscious) it always has and always will. Anyone receiving the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick must always receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation before the Anointing if they are aware of Mortal sin and capable of Confessing it. This is also why ONlY a priest can celebrate the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick specifically because of it’s ability to forgive sins which only a priest or Bishop can do.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]That is incorrect. The Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick always forgives all sins for anyone incapable of receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation,(such as being unconscious) it always has and always will. Anyone receiving the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick must always receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation before the Anointing if they are aware of Mortal sin and capable of Confessing it. This is also why ONlY a priest can celebrate the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick specifically because of it’s ability to forgive sins which only a priest or Bishop can do.
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Really??? You learn something new every day

[quote=katolik]Really??? You learn something new every day
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Thanks all who replied to this, it has been a real learning lesson. I have emphsemsa, copd, half of my lungs, on nebulizer & oxygen. I will make an appointment next week after the holidays for the receiving of this special Sacrament, 'cause I am in danger of leaving this life at any time. Again, thanks all.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]That is incorrect. The Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick always forgives all sins for anyone incapable of receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation,(such as being unconscious) it always has and always will. Anyone receiving the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick must always receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation before the Anointing if they are aware of Mortal sin and capable of Confessing it. This is also why ONlY a priest can celebrate the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick specifically because of it’s ability to forgive sins which only a priest or Bishop can do.
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Nah nah nah nah nahhhh naahhh. PPllllbbbbBbbb

Get well soon Cowboy.

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