Last Rites

Am I right in saying that the Last Rites/Anointing of the Sick are the same, and that their purpose is possible healing of the body, and of sending one to Heaven, allowing them to bypass purgatory?

[quote=FuzzyBunny116]Am I right in saying that the Last Rites/Anointing of the Sick are the same, and that their purpose is possible healing of the body, and of sending one to Heaven, allowing them to bypass purgatory?
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Kinda sorta. Last Rites usually include the Viaticum.

[quote=FuzzyBunny116]Am I right in saying that the Last Rites/Anointing of the Sick are the same, and that their purpose is possible healing of the body, and of sending one to Heaven, allowing them to bypass purgatory?
[/quote]

The Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick is part of the Last Rites. The purpose of Last Rites is to prepare a person spiritually for the possibility of death.

The Last Rites actually encompasses three sacraments, Penance, Eucharist, and Anointing of the Sick. If the person is unconscious or unable to confess and/or receive the Eucharist, the Anointing of the Sick forgives the persons sins venial and mortal. Whether it would put one in a state to bypass purgatory I do not know for sure, but I think not…

Is not the annoining of the sick also called extreme unction?

[quote=rwoehmke]The Last Rites actually encompasses three sacraments, Penance, Eucharist, and Anointing of the Sick. If the person is unconscious or unable to confess and/or receive the Eucharist, the Anointing of the Sick forgives the persons sins venial and mortal. Whether it would put one in a state to bypass purgatory I do not know for sure, but I think not…
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From New Advent’s site:

The relics or effects of sin mentioned by the Council of Trent are variously understood by theologians to mean one, or more, or all of the following: spiritual debility and depression caused by the consciousness of having sinned; the influence of evil habits induced by sin; temporal penalties remaining after the guilt of sin has been forgiven; and venial, or even mortal, sins themselves. Of these only the remission of temporal punishment is distinct from the other effects of which the council speaks; and though some theologians have been loath to admit this effect at all, lest they might seem to do away with the raison d’être of purgatory and of prayers and indulgences for the dying and dead, there is really no solid ground for objecting to it, if passing controversial interests are subordinated to Catholic theory. It is not suggested that extreme unction, like baptism, sacramentally remits all temporal punishment due to sin, and the extent to which it actually does so in any particular case may, as with baptism, fall short of what was Divinely intended, owing to obstacles or defective dispositions in the recipient. Hence there is still room and need for Indulgences for the dying, and if the Church offers her prayers and applies Indulgences for adults who die immediately after baptism, she ought, a fortiori, to offer them for those who have died after extreme unction. And if temporal punishment be, as it certainly is, one of the reliquioe of sin, and if extreme unction be truly what the Council of Trent describes (Sess. XIV, De Extr. Unct., introduct.) as “the consummation not merely of [the Sacrament of] Penance, but of the whole Christian life, which ought to be a perpetual penance”, it is impossible to deny that the remission of temporal punishment is one of the effects of this sacrament.

Thanks Scott, I read your post with some joy as I was last anointed while unconscious after a major heart attack. It is conforting to know that if things had turned out diferently I would probably be before the throne of God at this point. :thumbsup:

Yes.

If the situation is extreme, it’s called “extreme Unction”

If the situation is serious, but not to the extreme, it’s called “Unction”

In other words, the name of the sacrament is “Unction” the word “extreme” is merely an adjective to be used only if it applies to the situation.

Yes, I did see that this thread is nearly 3 years old, but if people are still reading it, what’s the harm in responding?

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