Last Supper


#1

My knowledge of the last supper is somewhat limited to pictures that hung in my Grandpa’s kitchen and in my parish office. One has women and children included and one doesn’t.

I would suppose one of these is wrong. I didn’t see reference to the women and children in my Bible but it didn’t really say that only Jesus and the apostles were there either.

???


#2

A lot of people uncorrectly confuse St. John with St. Mary Magdalene…that is a misconception that has been perpetuated by “The Divinci Code”…which is a bastardly act of fiction…a cancer to the Catholic faith.

[quote=saturday5feb]My knowledge of the last supper is somewhat limited to pictures that hung in my Grandpa’s kitchen and in my parish office. One has women and children included and one doesn’t.

I would suppose one of these is wrong. I didn’t see reference to the women and children in my Bible but it didn’t really say that only Jesus and the apostles were there either.

???
[/quote]


#3

The picture I saw was a modestly crowded room with several non-apostle “extras.”


#4

[quote=saturday5feb]My knowledge of the last supper is somewhat limited to pictures that hung in my Grandpa’s kitchen and in my parish office. One has women and children included and one doesn’t.

I would suppose one of these is wrong. I didn’t see reference to the women and children in my Bible but it didn’t really say that only Jesus and the apostles were there either.

???
[/quote]

Are you sure you’re not confusing it w/ a picture of the Wedding Feast At Cana???


#5

I think you’re asking too much of artistic representations to always be historically or biblically precise (unless that is the stated purpose of the picture or other piece of art). Most are trying to convey one or a limited number of truths about the event being portrayed. Da Vinci’s Last Supper, for example, focuses on the moment when Jesus announced he will be betrayed by one of his disciples. It is alos worth noting that Jews in Jesus’ time did not sit straight-backed around a table for meals; rather they “reclined” on their left elbows and took food with their right.

The scriptural accounts mention only Jesus and his apostles, but as it was a borrowed room, we might assume that members of the family that lived there might be present or at least in the house. Also, SOMEONE (probably the lady of the house or her servants) had to cook and prepare the meal, and men didn’t cook much in those days (this was pre-Emeril).


#6

Hi Saturday,

I tend to think like the poster who mentioned the wedding at Cana, but if you come right down to it, serving 13 people at supper is no mean task. There must have been some cooks, servants, etc.

Verbum


#7

[quote=saturday5feb]My knowledge of the last supper is somewhat limited to pictures that hung in my Grandpa’s kitchen and in my parish office. One has women and children included and one doesn’t.

I would suppose one of these is wrong. I didn’t see reference to the women and children in my Bible but it didn’t really say that only Jesus and the apostles were there either.

???
[/quote]

You didn’t say which picture was where but let me take a guess the one with the womne and children was in the parish office?


#8

Yup, the office. Our pastor recommended that reading McBrien would be a good idea for lent… I’ll have to double check it wasn’t a wedding, and I can understand the cook angle but that doesn’t explain the kids. As I recall it looked like Grandpa’s with more people. Oh well.


#9

John’s gospel seems to make it clear only the 12 apostles were present.


#10

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