Latin in the Mass


#1

Does your parish use any Latin during Mass?


#2

I’m confused–how do these two options differ?


#3

durning Lent and Advent we sing the Kyrie, Sanctus, Agnus Dei, preface dialogue, memorial acclamation and Pater Noster in Latin. We did this for the confirmation Mass because the kids know it and they voted for it. It helps because there are a lot of bi-lingual Masses during those seasons and it helps even things up. We have a worship aid and the pastor has taken great care and time in teaching these parts to the parish.


#4

The parish I attend has in Latin:

chant
Kyrie (Greek obviously)
Credo
Sanctus
Parts of the Eucharistic prayer
Mysterium Fide
Pater Noster and Doxology
Agnus Dei
and the responses vary between English and Latin depending on the celebrant.

I like it because the parts of the mass that don’t change can be easily memorized in Latin but the parts that do change (like the readings) are said in English so you don’t have to follow along in a missal.


#5

In Germany, where I happen to live now though I am American, it has never passed out of common usage to have the ordinary in Latin/Greek. This is typically done in organ-accompanied plainchant alternatim between choir and congregation.


#6

Ever since Vatican II, up untill now, my parish church sings the

Alleluia and the great AMEN in Latin :smiley:


#7

As follows, at the Mass where I sing in the choir:

Kyrie: Greek

Gloria: Latin

Sanctus: Latin

Mysterium Fidei: Latin

Amen: Latin (:rolleyes:)

Agnus Dei: Latin


#8

[quote=Vox Borealis]I’m confused–how do these two options differ?
[/quote]

If you watch the daily Mass on EWTN, parts of it are said in Latin. My parish says the Mass ALL in English. No Latin, at all.


#9

I don’t know how to vote on this one. I think during Christmas, we sang Gloria once :wink: .

At another parish I frequent, Our Lady of Peace shrine, they have a Mass in Latin (non-Tridentine). That Mass has a lot of latin in it. :smiley:


#10

No Latin in Sunday Masses. Much Latin in daily Masses, but only for Associate pastor.

I think it is coming though, the pastor is holding a Lenten workshop on saying the Mass prayers in Latin. I am guessing it will lead to something…I’m excited!!!

But, I am certain we will still sing the banal new hymns.


#11

[quote=LeahInancsi]If you watch the daily Mass on EWTN, parts of it are said in Latin. My parish says the Mass ALL in English. No Latin, at all.
[/quote]

OK, I reread it–I thought the second option meant “No mass (not any mass) entirely in the vernacular” rather than “No, the mass is entirely in the vernacular.” My fault.

Our parish celebrates a very solemn high mass–incense, chanting, etc.–but entiely in the vernacular most of the time. On sunday a month, however, we celebrate what our pastor calls the “Traditional Latin Mass.” Of course, it is really a Novus Ordo with the ordinary in Latin, the rest in English. Very nice mass–I wish we would celebrate thus every week.


#12

I have a question about when Mass was almost entirely in Latin. Were homilies in Latin or the vernacular? I think they were in the vernacular, but I’m not sure.


#13

[quote=LRThunder]I have a question about when Mass was almost entirely in Latin. Were homilies in Latin or the vernacular? I think they were in the vernacular, but I’m not sure.
[/quote]

The homily is in the vernacular and the priest reads the Gospel and Epistle in the vernacular (after the Gospel and Epistle are first read in Latin).


#14

[quote=SFH]The homily is in the vernacular and the priest reads the Gospel and Epistle in the vernacular (after the Gospel and Epistle are first read in Latin).
[/quote]

Thanks.

One of the benefits of these forums is I learn more and more everyday. :slight_smile:


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