Latin Mass weekday Readings

Is there a lectionary for weekday readings for the Tridentine Rite? My 1962 missal only has Sunday readings and some for the feasts and Saints days. For example, the church bulletin states one day is: Feria IV class. Does anyone know what this means? thanks

There are no weekday readings in the Traditional Latin Mass. On a given weekday a priest will say the Mass of the Saint or the Feast. If there is no feast on that day then the day is known as a feria. The priest will then say a Votive Mass - several are provided in the Missal and the Mass of any saint can be said as a Votive Mass - or he will say the Mass of the preceeding Sunday.

James

I’d like to amend what I wrote above slightly.

For the most part there are no weekday readings. However, there are specific readings assigned to some days of the year such as the weekdays of Lent and Easter.

This site might be helpful.

James

[quote=James0235]I’d like to amend what I wrote above slightly.

For the most part there are no weekday readings. However, there are specific readings assigned to some days of the year such as the weekdays of Lent and Easter.

This site might be helpful.

James
[/quote]

Thank you, good link. I’ve just recently started attending the Latin indult mass, and I see that today, Septuagesima, isn’t even in the N.O. calendar. Definitely will take some getting used to.

The Daily Missal can be purchased here
cantius.org/webstore/Missal.htm

Feriae are feastdays which are “ranked” with different levels of importance. From the most to least importance, these are solemnities, feasts, memorials, and optional memorials.

[quote=dljl]Thank you, good link. I’ve just recently started attending the Latin indult mass, and I see that today, Septuagesima, isn’t even in the N.O. calendar. Definitely will take some getting used to.
[/quote]

You are welcome.

Yep. The season of Septuagesima along with the Time after Epiphany and Time after Pentacost were changed into Ordinary Time.

You’ll get used to the differences with a little time.

God bless,

James

It looks like the Saints days have changed also. Is there a document I can look at to reference all the changes? Or should I look through the documents from Vatican II?
thx again!!

[quote=dljl]It looks like the Saints days have changed also. Is there a document I can look at to reference all the changes? Or should I look through the documents from Vatican II?
thx again!!
[/quote]

You will not find the changing of Saint’s feast days in the documents of VII. I am unaware of any specific Church document that lists all of the changes.

Alot of the Saints still have the same feast days. Some were moved or removed to make way for nore recently canonized Saints. And I believe that others were moved so that they ended up outside of the season of Lent.

One thing that I find very helpful in comparing the 2 Liturgical Calendars, especially when it comes to feast days of the Saints, is a calendar put out by Tan Books. It covers both the Nouvs Ordo and Tridentine Liturgical years. And it also has some feasts which were historically celebrated but are no longer celebrated in either rite.

James

[quote=James0235]You will not find the changing of Saint’s feast days in the documents of VII. I am unaware of any specific Church document that lists all of the changes.

Alot of the Saints still have the same feast days. Some were moved or removed to make way for nore recently canonized Saints. And I believe that others were moved so that they ended up outside of the season of Lent.

One thing that I find very helpful in comparing the 2 Liturgical Calendars, especially when it comes to feast days of the Saints, is a calendar put out by Tan Books. It covers both the Nouvs Ordo and Tridentine Liturgical years. And it also has some feasts which were historically celebrated but are no longer celebrated in either rite.

James
[/quote]

I’d love to hear what the rationale is for moving some of the saint’s feast days in the new calendar. I’ve got the Tan calendar, and I’ve noticed that on a few occasions a saint was moved just a few days. But, on the traditional feast day, no new saint was added to the new calendar. So in that case, why was it moved?

I’ve heard that some of the saints, like Christopher and Valentine, were dropped from the new calendar because we don’t have enough historical information about them. Others, it seems rather arbitrary.

[quote=Dr. Bombay]I’ve heard that some of the saints, like Christopher and Valentine, were dropped from the new calendar because we don’t have enough historical information about them. Others, it seems rather arbitrary.
[/quote]

Some of those Saints who were dropped have returned to the Calendar. St. Catherine of Alexandria has returned to the calendar on her traditional feast day, November 25th. St. Christopher was removed more because his feast day shares the feast day with St. James the Apostle (July 25th). The Feast of the Apostle has precedence over that of the martyr and that was emphasized at Vatican II. St. Christopher’s feast day may be celebrated only if you live in a parish or region that has always had a great devotion to him. Such as if your church is under his patronage. Why they just didn’t give him a new Feast day like St. Therese is beyond me.

It would be nice to see the two Saints you mentioned return to the Calendar. Especially since the secular and commercial world still celebrates St. Valentine’s day. People have no idea what’s behind that day, that it is a day in which for centuries honored the patron Saint of love. I still call it St. Valentine’s Day and say a prayer to him on that day.

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