Latin Question

How would one say either,

Seeker of Truth and Truth Seeker

in latin? Next,

Defender of Truth and Truth Defender?

petens veritatis, or amans veritatis
defensor veritatis

The previous post comes to you, courtesy of my husband the Latin teacher.I, being an old Latin major, would have said
Quaesitor veritatis, veritatis quaesitor
Defensor veritatis, veritatis defensor.

Mys husband was using the present participle of peto and amo as
nouns,

Thank you!

so which one is right?

[quote=Aurelia]The previous post comes to you, courtesy of my husband the Latin teacher.I, being an old Latin major, would have said
Quaesitor veritatis, veritatis quaesitor
Defensor veritatis, veritatis defensor.

Mys husband was using the present participle of peto and amo as
nouns,
[/quote]

They are all “right” in a sense, but the emboldened offerings above get my vote as the best renderings.

tee
Latin afficianado, but by no means expert

[quote=CatholicBerean]so which one is right?
[/quote]

I only have 2 years of Latin from high school back before the bicentennial, but I remember enough to share that it’s good to know that in Latin the sequence of words is of absolutely no importance.

This is why for folks who haven’t been made familiar with the construct of Latin words, themselves may trip over learning Latin and think that Latin is so DIFFICULT to learn.

You don’t just learn singular and plural for each noun. You learn 5 declensions (if I remember right, Aurelia?) for each singular and plural of the same noun for whatever grammatical purpose of 5 standard grammatical purposes that noun happens to have in that sentence.

Not only do nouns have the characteristic of being either male or female (like in Spanish) but they might instead be neutral.

Nouns have their own declensions that indicate whether that word is the subject or the object of the sentence. Or is taking another role in grammar like the object of a preposition. If it’s the object of the preposition, the word iends differently than if it’s the subject of that particular sentence or if it’s the object of that particular sentence.

It doesn’t matter at all WHERE in the sentence the subject appears. The subject can occur last or in the middle of the sentence and still be the subject.

So… it’s the same thing for whether it’s:

Quaesitor veritatis or veritatis quaesitor

Defensor veritatis or veritatis defensor.

Defensor means “defender of” as the subject of the phrase.
Veritatis means “truth” as the object of the phrase because “is” ends the word that means “truth,” itself. “Truth” as the subject would start with the same stem “veri” and end with a different ending to make it the subject.

Have I lost you yet? Sorry… but I don’t remember offhand what the stem in Latin for “tuth” is… :frowning:

Does this help?

Does anyone have a link to Latin text of prayers? Perhaps the Rosary in Latin as well?

[quote=GregKlecan]Does anyone have a link to Latin text of prayers? Perhaps the Rosary in Latin as well?
[/quote]

The Thesaurus Precum Latinarum is the best. :thumbsup:

Can you translate this for me? In believe that it rhymns in Latin.

"Words teach but example motivates.

Thanks

[quote=Micki]Can you translate this for me? In believe that it rhymns in Latin.

"Words teach but example motivates.

Thanks
[/quote]

Rhymes are easy in such a regular inflected language. :slight_smile:

Verba docent, exempla movent

(NB: to make it a rhyme rather than an assonance, it has to be “…examples motivate”)

A far more common maxim (by about 2 orders of magnitude, according to Google) is

Verba docent, exempla trahunt

which is more akin to “Words teach, examples compel”

(In case I’m doing someone’s homework for them: Everything I said might be wrong! :rotfl: )

I would agree with the others–*petens veritas *is truth seeking. *Defensor veritatis *is defender of truth. :thumbsup:

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