Latin Rite Catholics Only: Ritual Transfer


#1

I’m interested to know. Additional comments/stories are welcome.


#2

I think I am really more interested in learning more about the other rites than actually transfering. Does that make sense?


#3

I know I am not a Latin Rite Catholic but then there is really no such thing. You belong to a ritual church, in the case of Latin Catholics, it is the Latin (or Roman) Catholic Church and the Church belongs to the rite. But that is really just picking at nits.

My quesiton is, what is “American Orthodox”?


#4

[quote=ByzCath]I know I am not a Latin Rite Catholic but then there is really no such thing. You belong to a ritual church, in the case of Latin Catholics, it is the Latin (or Roman) Catholic Church and the Church belongs to the rite. But that is really just picking at nits.
[/quote]

You are correct. I chose to call it tranferring one’s “rite” because, de facto, tranferring one’s Church in North America usually means adopting a new Rite. The Ambrosian and Mozarabic Catholic Churches, which are the other Churches of the Roman rite, have no juridstictional presence on this continent.

My quesiton is, what is “American Orthodox”?

“American Orthodox” would refer to the emerging tradition within American Orthodoxy especially represented by the Orthodox Chruch of America (OCA) and perhaps the ROCOR. Although both are daughters of the Russian Orthodox tradition, originally brought to North America via Alaska, both reflect Orthodox developments native to America within the past 200-300 years. Among the factors are certainly: (1) the Russian Choral Tradition (2) influences from the American Byzatine Catholics (usualy Carpatho-Russian) who returned to Orthodoxy (3) American liturgcal scholarship, and (4) histoical/geographical factors.

Whether the OCA can be sufficiently distinguished from the Russian tradition is debateable, but it certainly has its own identity: the OCA is an autocephalous member of the Orthodox communion. It, of course, has no clear counterpart in the Catholic communion, thought it bears many similarities to kindred Slavic traditions represented within the Byzantine Rite.

I concede its mention is debateable, but I added it because it lacks a clear counterpart within the Catholic communion. Members of the OCA or ROCOR who transfer to the Catholic family usually choose between the Melkite, Byzantine-Ruthenians, Ukrainian, Russian, or other Churches.


Also, athough an Anglican Use exists within the Roman Cathoic Church of the US, i included it because of rumors that Anglican Catholics might someday be granted their own particular church. (sui juris) While I personally reject this idea… hey, ya never know.


#5

[quote=adventistnomore]“American Orthodox” would refer to the emerging tradition within American Orthodoxy especially represented by the Orthodox Chruch of America (OCA) and perhaps the ROCOR. Although both are daughters of the Russian Orthodox tradition, originally brought to North America via Alaska, both reflect Orthodox developments native to America within the past 200-300 years. Among the factors are certainly: (1) the Russian Choral Tradition (2) influences from the American Byzatine Catholics (usualy Carpatho-Russian) who returned to Orthodoxy (3) American liturgcal scholarship, and (4) histoical/geographical factors.

Whether the OCA can be sufficiently distinguished from the Russian tradition is debateable, but it certainly has its own identity: the OCA is an autocephalous member of the Orthodox communion. It, of course, has no clear counterpart in the Catholic communion, thought it bears many similarities to kindred Slavic traditions represented within the Byzantine Rite.

I concede its mention is debateable, but I added it because it lacks a clear counterpart within the Catholic communion. Members of the OCA or ROCOR who transfer to the Catholic family usually choose between the Melkite, Byzantine-Ruthenians, Ukrainian, Russian, or other Churches.


Also, athough an Anglican Use exists within the Roman Cathoic Church of the US, i included it because of rumors that Anglican Catholics might someday be granted their own particular church. (sui juris) While I personally reject this idea… hey, ya never know.
[/quote]

That is why I asked that.

Why would the Church create a whole new body when there are already multiple Byzantine Catholic Churches.

As for the Anglican Use issue, I have heard the same things as you and feel the same way as you do.


#6

That’s the Mass I would attend! Unfortunately, the Anglican use parish in our diocese died out before I moved here. Even then, it was supplied by a Latin Rite priest, not an Anglican convert (I guess that doesn’t matter). This is one reason that I try (I really do) to be respectful of those who are attached to the TLM celebrated under the Indult: people monkeying around with what is already beautiful is never a good idea (witness the old 1928 Anglican Consecration Prayer with one option in the new Episcopalian prayerbook that we, when I was Episcopalian, called "the Star Wars Prayer of Consecration), though I love the Mass of Paul VI, as that is what I’ve known since I entered the Church.


#7

[quote=JKirkLVNV]…“the Star Wars Prayer of Consecration…”
[/quote]

Haha, why was it called that?


#8

No. But that not preclude us from attending any of the Easter Rites in the Catholic Church.

The Chaldean Catholic Cathedral is only about a half mile away from where I live. I plan on attending a Divine Liturgy there as well as at a Melkite Catholic Church that Deacon Ed mentioned on his BBs.

BTW: I consider myself a Catholic who just happens to belong to the Latin Rite.

PF


#9

Roman rite all the way, though I respect and love the other folks without a problem.


#10

I am confirmed Roman Rite and I am fine staying where I am.


#11

I’m a convert from a rad-trad Anglican communion. When I became convinced that the Catholic Church possessed the Fullness of Faith, I was compelled to convert, but the dreadful Novus Ordo Mass was a dead turn-off for me (coming from the grandeur and dignity of the traditional Anglican “mass”). I briefly considered converting to one of the more traditional Rites where worship is more dignified, but I lacked the cultural connection to identify with these Rites.

But if the Church approved a traditional Anglican Rite, I would seriously consider it.


#12

Trying to compare the different Rites or Churches of Catholicism is like trying to compare the Tridentine Rite to the Novus Ordo Missae. Both have advantages and disadvantages, both are a source of grace. I would entertain the idea, but why would I change? We have the universal pastor as our patriarch. Not to mention our cassocks look soooooo cool!


#13

[quote=twiztedseraph]… is like trying to compare the Tridentine Rite to the Novus Ordo Missae.
[/quote]

I was not aware that there was such a thing as a Tridentine Rite.


#14

[quote=DavidFilmer]I was not aware that there was such a thing as a Tridentine Rite.
[/quote]

Thats because there is no such thing.


#15

I am VERY interested in attending a Byzantine rite mass…it sounds so beautiful from what I’ve heard on EWTN (the ritual, the reverance, the music…). Unfortunately, there’s nothing within an hour’s drive.


#16

You can always go to a Byzantine Divine Liturgy, and it will fulfill your Sunday obligation, since we’re all catholic. You can even go to confession and receieve communion as well, in fact the vatican encourages you to do so. If you were to start going to Divine Liturgy on a regular basis, you still have to observe all the Latin rite feast days.


#17

I would like to attend a Byzantine Rite Church at some point also. I love to learn more and more about our beautiful 'Bride of Christ".


#18

While I’m aware of the Byzintine and Melkites and a couple of others I understand there is a total of aproximatly 25 different Catholic Rites.

Can someone show me a link or list all the different cathlolic rites and if possible their percentages relative to all catholics.

Thank you.

While I do not believe I will change rites I would most definitly be intersted in going to a non-latin rite mass just to get the another taste of other Cathlolic sister churches.


#19

[quote=Micael]While I’m aware of the Byzintine and Melkites and a couple of others I understand there is a total of aproximatly 25 different Catholic Rites.

Can someone show me a link or list all the different cathlolic rites and if possible their percentages relative to all catholics.

Thank you.

While I do not believe I will change rites I would most definitly be intersted in going to a non-latin rite mass just to get the another taste of other Cathlolic sister churches.
[/quote]

There are 5 Rites and 23 Churches within those Rites.

If you do a search on the forum for Rite and such you will find a wealth of information that has already been posted.


#20

[quote=Micael]Can someone show me a link or list all the different cathlolic rites and if possible their percentages relative to all catholics?
[/quote]

Here’s at least a summary of the former:

credo.stormloader.com/ritesofc.htm


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