Latin Rite Catholics


#1

Are Latin Rite Catholics just Roman Catholics that go to Latin Mass? Do you have to go through a course of study to become a Latin Rite Catholic?


#2

As far as I know, the Latin Rite is equivalent to the Roman Rite. American Catholics are generally members of the Roman Rite, even though the Mass of the Roman Rite is no longer in Latin.


#3

Would it be ok to participate in the Latin Mass and receive the Eucharist even though you might not understand all the latin parts of the Mass? Our Diocese offers the Latin Mass every day and I would like to try it.


#4

Yes, it is fine. you might try to find out if the Mass said in Latin is the rite of Paul VI, or what is referred to as a Tridentine Mass; the two rites have more similarities than many would suggest, but there are different prayers, no old Testament reading in the Tridentine rite, and the rubrics are more intricate.

I was out of state traveling during the week of Thanksgiving, and the Sunday before I arrived in Provo, Utah late enough that I ended up going to a Mass in Spanish. Considering I do not speak Spanish, and it has been decades since I studied Latin, I can understand your question about it being ok to attend Mass and receive the Eucharist if you don’t understand the language. however, prior to the change to the vernacular, most people did not understand latin, either; some used Missals, some did not, but it was still valid.

Oh, and the Mass was standing room only in a room that also served as a gymnasium. I was impressed with the attendance.


#5

The Catholic Faith is composed of 22 Churches spread across 6 Rites: [list]*]Alexandrean Rite
- Coptic Catholic Church
- Ethiopian (& Eritrean) Catholic Church

*] Antiochene Rite
- Syriac Catholic Church
- Syro-Malabarese Catholic Church
- Syro-Malankarese Catholic Church

*] Armenian Rite
- Armenian Catholic Church

*] Byzantine Rite
- Albanian Catholic Church
- Belarusan Catholic Church
- Bulgarian Catholic Church
- Croatian Catholic Church
- Georgian Catholic Church
- Greek Catholic Church
- Hungarian Catholic Church
- Italo-Greco-Albanian Catholic Church
- Melkite Catholic Church
- Russian Catholic Church
- Romanian Catholic Church
- Ruthenian Catholic Church
- Slovakian Catholic Church
- Ukrainian Catholic Church

*] Latin Rite
- Roman Catholic Church

*] Maronite Rite
- Maronite Catholic Church[/list] … so Latin Rite Catholics and Roman Catholics are pretty much the same thing.


#6

In essence then, being a Latin Rite Catholic has nothing to do with attending the Mass in the Latin language.


#7

Correct.


#8

[quote=Holland]Would it be ok to participate in the Latin Mass and receive the Eucharist even though you might not understand all the latin parts of the Mass? Our Diocese offers the Latin Mass every day and I would like to try it.
[/quote]

To expand on what otm said in post #4.

You could also inquire if they provide a translation to follow. The old “Tridentine” Missals provided the Latin text on the left page and the vernacular on the right so it isn’t difficult to follow and you don’t need to understand any Latin. It took me about 4 times to pick up on it and follow consistently. Some Catholic book stores can order a 1962 Missal or you could pick one up from the Intenet. I was lucky enough to get my grandmother’s. If the Mass is the current right, the parish might provide a text to read along. If not, you can pick up a current copy of the Missal and any good Catholic book store and the Latin text should be included. In mine, it is only in the Weekday edition so it would be really inconvenient if I wanted to use it on a Sunday.


#9

There are actually 2 Rites within the Latin Church: Roman and Ambrosian


#10

A “rite” is composed of one or more “churches” so your statement about there being 2 “rites” within the Latin “church” is incorrect.

There MIGHT be two ‘churches’ within the Latin ‘rite’ but not the other way around because every source that I have ever seen lists only six rites within the Catholic faith and only the Roman Catholic Church in the Latin Rite (reference).

Can you provide some additional info regarding “Ambrosian”? You now have me curious.


#11

By ‘rite’ I refer to liturgical practice. The Ambrosian rite is practiced around Milan, the see of St. Ambrose. The language is Latin, but the specific ways in which the liturgies are carried out are distinct and different from the Roman Rite. The Ambrosian cannot be called a distinct “church”, since the Archbishop of Milan does not function as the Patriarch of the Ambrosians; he is under the Patriarchate of the Bishop of Rome.


#12

[quote=Fidei Defensor]By ‘rite’ I refer to liturgical practice. The Ambrosian rite is practiced around Milan, the see of St. Ambrose. The language is Latin, but the specific ways in which the liturgies are carried out are distinct and different from the Roman Rite. The Ambrosian cannot be called a distinct “church”, since the Archbishop of Milan does not function as the Patriarch of the Ambrosians; he is under the Patriarchate of the Bishop of Rome.
[/quote]

Okay, now I understand. There are 6 main rites in the Catholic faith. Here, “rite” refers to “traditions”. When using ‘rite’ to refer to a ‘liturgical practice’, that is considered a ‘usage’. A “Usage” is a term of recent origin that ordinarily denotes limited, localized differences within a church itself (as opposed to Rescensions, which occur within a Rite). There are many ‘usages’, or liturgical practices, within the Roman Catholic Church – Ambrosian, Benedictine, Fransiscans, Dominicans, Jesuits, etc.; but they should not be confused with the six primary Traditions, or Rites.

So, to clarify, within the Latin Rite of the Catholic faith is found the Roman Catholic Church. In the Roman Catholic Church, are many ‘usages’ (liturgical practices or rites) such as Ambrosian, Benedictine, Fransiscans, Dominicans, Jesuits, etc.


#13

[quote=Holland]Would it be ok to participate in the Latin Mass and receive the Eucharist even though you might not understand all the latin parts of the Mass? Our Diocese offers the Latin Mass every day and I would like to try it.
[/quote]

I would suggest first that you just visit a Latin Mass and observe. Holy Communion is traditionally received kneeling at the altar rail in the mouth. If you have never done this before you may want to just watch for a few time. Of course any Baptized practicing Catholic in a state of grace can receive Holy Communion at any valid Catholic Mass. The actions and procedures however are different for different liturgies. The last time I knelt at an altar rail for Holy Communion was about 25 years ago at St. Judes in St. Petersburg and the last time I heard a Latin language Mass was 30 some years ago. I went to a Latin Mass offered in the diocese of Cleveland this past August. It all came back right away, however I was prepared to just observe and not receive Holy Communion.

P.S. There are 24 Churches that make up the Catholic communion of Churches using eight liturgical Rites. The other Western Rites were suppressed after Vatican II and it was agreed that the Liturgies of specific Religious Orders would not be used in public any longer.


#14

[quote=Br. Rich SFO] There are 24 Churches that make up the Catholic communion of Churches using eight liturgical Rites.
[/quote]

What two Churches and what two Rites am I missing in my above list? :confused: I’d like to keep it current and up-to-date for future reference :thumbsup:


#15

Hey, what about the extinct Gallican rite?


#16

[quote=patrick456]Hey, what about the extinct Gallican rite?
[/quote]

I think that falls under this statement … after Vatican II and it was agreed that the Liturgies of specific Religious Orders would not be used in public any longer


#17

[quote=Sir Knight]I think that falls under this statement … after Vatican II and it was agreed that the Liturgies of specific Religious Orders would not be used in public any longer
[/quote]

From what i recall, the Gallican rite isn’t a religious order rite.

newadvent.org/cathen/06357a.htm

Oh yeah, how about the Mozarabic rite?
Can anyone explain what it is?


#18

[quote=Sir Knight]The Catholic Faith is composed of 22 Churches spread across 6 Rites:
[/quote]

Sir Knight,

23 Churches and 7 Rites. The Chaldean Catholic Church, which uses the Chaldean Rite, is missing from your list. Additionally, the Syro-Malabarese are also of the Chaldean Rite, rather than the Antiochene Rite (formerly, the Chaldean Rite was often described as the East Syrian Tradition of the Antiochene Rite).

Joe


#19

I say 6 & 22, you say 7 & 23, Br. Rich SFO says 8 & 24. It appears that there is a difference of opinion here :slight_smile:


#20

[quote=Sir Knight]What two Churches and what two Rites am I missing in my above list? :confused: I’d like to keep it current and up-to-date for future reference :thumbsup:
[/quote]

This is the list I developed from several different sources when studying the Eastern Churches and Rites this past summer.

Churches:

Armenian

Coptic

Ethiopian

Maronite*

Chaldean

Syro-Malabar

Syrian

Syro-Malankara

Melkite

Italo-Albanian

Ukrainian

Romanian

Ruthenian

Byzantine

Greek

Greek Slav

Bulgarian

Slovak

Hungarian

Russian

Belarusian

Albanian

Georgian

Roman

Liturgical Rites:

Armeanian

Byzantine

Coptic

Ethiopian

East Syrian

West Syrian

Maronite

Roman or Latin

P.S. I’m not yelling. The font size is normal on the preview.


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