Latin Rite Icons


#1

Hello Eastern Catholics,

Since iconography has continued within the Eastern tradition are you all aware of any Roman Catholic Icons that are made? I am specifically looking for an icon of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Thank you.


#2

[quote="rben20, post:1, topic:224965"]
Hello Eastern Catholics,

Since iconography has continued within the Eastern tradition are you all aware of any Roman Catholic Icons that are made? I am specifically looking for an icon of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Thank you.

[/quote]

Hello,

You would probably not find an Eastern rite icon of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, since that is primarily a Roman rite devotion. And icons are mostly written (is this the right term?) in the East. However, there are some (probably Western) icons of the Sacred Heart: google.ca/images?um=1&hl=en&rlz=1R2SNNT_enCA387&biw=1345&bih=529&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=Sacred+Heart+of+Jesus+icon&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

God bless :)


#3

Actually, there ARE pseudo-icons of the Sacred Heart. I’ve seen one.

They mirror, but in iconographic style, the western paintings of the sacred heart.


#4

[quote="Monica4316, post:2, topic:224965"]
Hello,

You would probably not find an Eastern rite icon of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, since that is primarily a Roman rite devotion. And icons are mostly written (is this the right term?) in the East. However, there are some (probably Western) icons of the Sacred Heart: google.ca/images?um=1&hl=en&rlz=1R2SNNT_enCA387&biw=1345&bih=529&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=Sacred+Heart+of+Jesus+icon&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

God bless :)

[/quote]

Yup, written is the proper term;)


#5

When we are talking about “icon” most of the time it is assumed that it is Byzantine, with Byzantine rule to produce it. Those icons conforming the “Byzantine” rule of icon writing called called true icon.

What about other tradition in the east apart from Byzantine?
For instance, it is prohibited to depict human heart in Byzantine iconography.
Is the same prohibition exists in other eastern traditions (Coptic, Ethiopia, Maronite, Syriac, etc)?


#6

Not exactly. the greek word Graphos is equally valid for painting and writing. And several iconographers, well versed in the theology, object to “writing”…

Writing or Painting are both equally valid terms, but painting is more honest to what is being done.


#7

I was only able to find two:

catholiccompany.com/divine-mercy-bell-shaped-florentine-plaque-high-gloss-p2014183/

catholiccompany.com/sacred-heart-jesus-bell-shaped-florentine-plaque-high-gloss-p2014186/

EDIT: Here's a diptych:

catholiccompany.com/immaculate-heart-sacred-heart-diptych-p2002071/

EDIT: This link has many that art framed art if that's acceptable:

catholiccompany.com/sacred-heart-c790/


#8

I didn`t know that Aramis, but I have usually heard icons referred to as being written.


#9

[quote="kitkatty, post:8, topic:224965"]
I didn`t know that Aramis, but I have usually heard icons referred to as being written.

[/quote]

Russian iconographers refer to themselves as "ikonpisatily", literally "ikon-writers" but when asked if they "write" ikons, they say no, they "paint" them....


#10

I had a conversation with a Greek Orthodox monastic who painted icons, and he assured me that ‘paint’ is the correct term


#11

Thanks for the correction, it`s always good to learn the correct terms.


#12

Yes. This one was painted by a Brother I know of named Br. Claude Lane. He’s a Benedictine monk at Mount Angel Abbey.

mountangelabbey.org/monastery/images/Sacred-Heart-2-700px.jpg


#13

There are lots of "icons" written (or PAINTED:p - I always heard it as "written":D) of Western saints published by a company that calls itself "Monastery icons", and they are they are very popular with Catholic bookstores and religious items stores, such as Leaflet Missal. (They include the "Sacred Heart of Jesus icon" which is the second item to appear at this link mentioned below: google.ca/images?um=1&hl=...=&oq=&gs_rfai= - you can always tell that this company produces them because of the characteristic tan background.)

This company is affiliated with an organization known as the Gnostic Orthodox Church, and it is really better to use icons from Orthodox or Catholic sources. I am very skeptical of the claims of demon worship going on at the "monastery" where the icons are written/painted, but they are certainly much more influenced by hermetic, gnostic, and Hindu influences than they should be. (Their "bishop" said he didn't need to be ordained because he already had been in a previous life.) As my Eastern Catholic spiritual father phrased it, the "monks" claim to follow the Coptic rite but follow it about as faithfully as Bob Marley followed the Ethiopian rite.

Just a warning.


#14

Icons really only stayed a part of the Western tradition in countries where there was a lot of natural cross-fertilization between the rites because of geographical proximity. I've seen the Our Lady of Perpetual Help icon (a Greek icon originally called the "Theotokos of the Passion") in Polish churches, and you will see a lot of frescoes in Sicily and southern Italy that look like icons (and in fact really are icons - the churches in question were originally of the Byzantine Rite, as was most of Italy). Blessed Fra Angelico is considered an iconographer in the Christian East (including in the Orthodox Church).

P.S. as a further caveat from my last post, I would also avoid the "icons" of Fr. McNichols of "St. Andrei Rublev Studio". It is not really compatible with the Christian faith to write an "icon" of a homosexual who was beaten to death after soliciting romantic involvement with someone who turned out to be heterosexual, nor to write an "icon" of Princess Diana, nor to write an "icon" of Al-Hallaj (whatever personal beliefs he or I may happen to have of his sanctity and the circumstances of his martyrdom - he may have offered up his life to "die in the confession of the Cross" as Fr. Massignon claims, but he wasn't baptized and professed Sufism to his death).


#15

Thank you for your replies. I have been trying to find something like my signature but I have been unlucky in that regards. Once again thank you for all your input. Did not know that Eastern traditions do not allow the heart to be painted?!


#16

Fun fact: Bob Marley was baptized into the Ethiopian Orthodox Church before he died. And when he went on tour later in life, it was the Orthodox faith he preached outside of Jamaica. :slight_smile:


#17

Interesting. Didn’t know this!:thumbsup:

(The priest I mentioned was obviously referring to Marley’s Rastafarianism, sans the actual Orthodoxy.)


#18

I found these guys a while back. I don’t know if they are the best or not, but they have one.

monasteryicons.com/product/sacred-heart-icon-548/icons-of-christ


#19

Yes and no.

There are Western images done in the style of iconography but they are not considered canonical.

I have traditional canonical icons and I have non canonical ones.

There is even debate about the canonicity issue at least among Orthodox.

russianicons.wordpress.com/tag/lord-sabaoth/

An icon of St Francis of Assisi is an icon but it’s not canonical.:shrug:

Also there are paintings in Western art that borrow heavily from Eastern iconography.

In some images the only difference is the medium.

Iconography is more than art it’s prayer because as other posters have said the icons are written.

Icons are also windows into heaven.


#20

It’s been rumored that Monatsery Icons are actually ran by a New Age/Pseudo christian monastery, but I could be wrong.

Regardless, it is known that, for Orthodox, “sacred heart” images will automatically render it not an icon, and is one of the points of contention between Catholic and Orthodox.


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