LATIN: some simple discussions

I thought I’d follow the moderator’s suggestion and start one of the Latin threads. Maybe this thread could be a simple discussion for those who are just learning. If anyone can correct my horrible grammar, please do. :slight_smile:

salve! volo cibum iam.

(yes, it’s time for lunch. :smiley: I’ll be back.)

Of course, if you want to have long, complicated discussions, or somewhere in between simple and complicated, then go right ahead. :yup:

By the way, this is the link to the thread that was made asking if there should be a Latin forum. A moderator replied saying we should make threads in/about Latin, and maybe we’d end up getting a Latin forum.
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=49393

(so I took the hint)

ego disco latinam linguam…

Does that mean: I circle the latin tongue? or I like to dance to latin lyrics?:stuck_out_tongue:

I gotta find a good interactive vocabulary…

Cheers,
Jim

Cantabit vacuus coram latrone viator. Gradu diverso, via una. Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo.

in seriousness, can any tell me the title of a good book to teach myself latin? for spanish “el camino real” is s super good book.

when i was in high school most of my study periods were in the back of a latin class. i wish i had paid attention. or better yet had taken the class. all i remember is declension and genetive and case, and agricolae…

[quote=jimmytoes]Does that mean: I circle the latin tongue? or I like to dance to latin lyrics?:stuck_out_tongue:

I gotta find a good interactive vocabulary…

Cheers,
Jim
[/quote]

:smiley: Nice one. It means “I am learning the Latin language.” At least, I think it does, because no one has corrected me yet. :wink:

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Cantabit vacuus coram latrone viator. Gradu diverso, via una. Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo.
[/quote]

Ok, bear with me. I’ve got to look up that first sentence, and a lot of the rest. What I’ve got so far: “something something, one road. something something something, I did not want, but I often something.” I’m probably somewhat wrong. To make it more interesting, though, I don’t think I’ll Google. Maybe I’ll pull out my handy dandy Cambridge Latin book.

This is fun already… but don’t mind me. :whacky:

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Cantabit vacuus coram latrone viator. Gradu diverso, via una. Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo.
[/quote]

The penniless traveler will sing in the presence of the highwayman; a man who has nothing has nothing to lose, the same road by different steps. The drop hollows out the stone by frequent dropping, not by force; constant persistence gains the end.

[quote=jjwilkman]in seriousness, can any tell me the title of a good book to teach myself latin? for spanish “el camino real” is s super good book.

when i was in high school most of my study periods were in the back of a latin class. i wish i had paid attention. or better yet had taken the class. all i remember is declension and genetive and case, and agricolae…
[/quote]

I use the Cambridge Latin program, but I have a teacher, so I don’t know how it would be to use it on your own. I haven’t used any other books, but Cambridge has an interesting storyline and the grammar is taken in pretty good steps. Sorry I can’t help you very much.

[quote=jjwilkman]in seriousness, can any tell me the title of a good book to teach myself latin? for spanish “el camino real” is s super good book.

when i was in high school most of my study periods were in the back of a latin class. i wish i had paid attention. or better yet had taken the class. all i remember is declension and genetive and case, and agricolae…
[/quote]

My best teach-myself-Latin resource is a slim volume titled Learn Latin by Peter Jones. I wasn’t learning from tabula rasa, but this was the work that really resurrected the high school Latin that I’d allowed to lapse :banghead: for half a lifetime.

tee

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]The penniless traveler will sing in the presence of the highwayman; a man who has nothing has nothing to lose, the same road by different steps. The drop hollows out the stone by frequent dropping, not by force; constant persistence gains the end.
[/quote]

:bigyikes: Wow. Yes, I need to work on my Latin. I haven’t learned all my cases yet, it’s pretty obvious. :o I’m always amazed that so few words in Latin equate to so many words in English.

Anyway… :bowdown: Maybe you could start a thread for those who are more superior in their Latin skills.

What is the definition of the word Viduus? I found it in an obituary dating back to 1769 in reference to an ancestor of mine.

[quote=icequeen]What is the definition of the word Viduus? I found it in an obituary dating back to 1769 in reference to an ancestor of mine.
[/quote]

“Deprived” or “bereft” – Was your ancestor widowed (or even divorced, since more mildly it can mean “separated”)?

(PS. A very thorough dictionary can be found at Perseus Classics Collections)
tee

Here’s my mini encyclical. Perhaps I should forward it to Cardinal Ratzinger if he gets elected. :smiley:

Excommunicantur omnes qui abortionem vulgant sive licitam electu dicunt. Simili modo excommunicantur qui pro eis suffragium in urnam ferunt. Excommunicantur sacerdotes et omnes alii professores iunctiones homosexuales licitae docentes. Excommunicantur episcopi qui leges fert versus Romani pontificis edicta. Excommunicantur omnes sacerdotes qui ex libera voluntate non dicunt missam contra obligationem sive negligunt sacramenta administrare intra populum. Excommunicantur mollestatores et dimittendi sunt ex sacerdotione et puniendi protectores istorum. Excommunicantur qui testes puniunt quia in questionem mollestationis aut alia causa contra clericos dicerint nisi ob fraudem.

Semper ubum sub ubum!

Venit summa dies et ineluctabile tempus.

habemus papam! :dancing:

decorem est mihi dicere ille in Latina linguam. :yup:

“Deprived” or “bereft” – Was your ancestor widowed (or even divorced, since more mildly it can mean “separated”)?

The ancestor was a widower, supposedly at least three times. Thanks for the definition, it actually helps to settle the question of whether this was his death date or not.

Atinlay isay eallyray oolcay.

ita vero.

[quote=JimO]Atinlay isay eallyray oolcay.
[/quote]

Quid lingua est hoc? (I seriously doubt it should be said this way)

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.