Latin: translation help

translate english into latin
The sturdy farmers of italy labor with great diligence in fields

Agricolae Italiae validi (cum) diligentia magno in agris arant

is this right?

Agricolae robusti Italiae magna cum diligentia agros colunt. (they cultivate fields)

Or … magna cum diligentia in agris laborant. (they work in the fields, strictly speaking)

thanks

I feel like I am back in my freshman year class! (runs screaming away).

No problem. Feel free to PM me any time.

Alright, I need some translation help, too. I was starting to read just a little of the Vulgate, to see how it matches up with the Bible in English. I was reading from John. The first part is “in principio erat Verbum et Verbum erat apud Deum et Deus erat Verbum”. I read in English “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.”

Now, I was just wondering (and pardon my ignorance), isn’t “Verbum” at the end of the sentence accusative? Wouldn’t it be “God was the Word”? Thanks for any help.

*This is where I found them!
sacred-texts.com/bib/vul/joh001.htm
usccb.org/nab/bible/john/john1.htm

[quote=KatarinaTherese]Now, I was just wondering (and pardon my ignorance), isn’t “Verbum” at the end of the sentence accusative? Wouldn’t it be “God was the Word”? Thanks for any help.
[/quote]

I am so happy to see so many Latin threads popping up on the forum! I’ll just chime in on this one :slight_smile:

“Verbum” at the end of the verse from the prologue to John’s gospel that you quote is actually in the nominative. This is because sum (from which erat comes) is intransitive (doesn’t take a direct object) and verbum is neuter and so can be nominative.

However, there’s no reason why one shouldn’t translate the Latin sentence “God was the Word” - the word order even suggests it.

The reason why one sees the translation “and the Word was God” is because of the original Greek text. The Greek is much more specific than Latin can be. The Greek for “Word” - ho logos - includes the article “the” (“ho”) while God -theos- is not thus making it clear that God is being predicated - is being “said of” or is describing- the Word and not vice versa.

Hope that makes sense - bet that’s about as clear as mud to most people!!

  • from peregrinator, a certified Classical language :nerd: :slight_smile:

[quote=abcdefg]translate english into latin
The sturdy farmers of italy labor with great diligence in fields

Agricolae Italiae validi (cum) diligentia magno in agris arant

is this right?
[/quote]

Make sure you keep the adjective(magno) in agreement with the noun(diligentia) in case, number, and gender.

[quote=KatarinaTherese] “in principio erat Verbum et Verbum erat apud Deum et Deus erat Verbum”.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.”

Now, I was just wondering (and pardon my ignorance), isn’t “Verbum” at the end of the sentence accusative? Wouldn’t it be “God was the Word”? Thanks for any help.

[/quote]

No, verbum is a predicate nominative. The verb “erat” is from the verb “Sum”, which means “to be”. This verb has no direct object. Since the object refers back to the subject, it would be in the nominative case. So Deus and verbum are both in the nominative case.

[quote=peregrinator_it]I am so happy to see so many Latin threads popping up on the forum! I’ll just chime in on this one :slight_smile:

“Verbum” at the end of the verse from the prologue to John’s gospel that you quote is actually in the nominative. This is because sum (from which erat comes) is intransitive (doesn’t take a direct object) and verbum is neuter and so can be nominative.

However, there’s no reason why one shouldn’t translate the Latin sentence “God was the Word” - the word order even suggests it.

The reason why one sees the translation “and the Word was God” is because of the original Greek text. The Greek is much more specific than Latin can be. The Greek for “Word” - ho logos - includes the article “the” (“ho”) while God -theos- is not thus making it clear that God is being predicated - is being “said of” or is describing- the Word and not vice versa.

Hope that makes sense - bet that’s about as clear as mud to most people!!

  • from peregrinator, a certified Classical language :nerd: :slight_smile:
    [/quote]

Thanks - wow, it made a lot of sense to me! :thumbsup: Alright now, back to John!

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