Leaving Catholicism

I was born to faithful Catholic parents and raise in the Catholic church. When I was 19 I decided to leave and become a Christian/protestant. Most of my family are still Catholics and we have been discussing different topics on which we have different views.

I wanted to ask you guys what implies to leave the Catholic church I’m terms of salvation?

People have said to me to keep in mind I’m leaving the sacraments and because of that I can’t be saved, but I haven’t found any biblical evidence for that. I believe in Christ as my saviour and I have confessed that as the bible says we have to.
Thank you in advance for your answers.

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The Catholic Church is Not “Sola Scriptura” It would be wise for you to consult the Catechism.

http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p2s2.htm

Faith and Works are necessary for salvation. No one knows for certain if they’re saved: “apart from a special revelation from God—have metaphysical (or absolute) certainty concerning his salvation”

https://www.catholic.com/magazine/print-edition/are-you-saved-if-only

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I am going to reply with the type of argument that secular thinkers propose on such topics.

Who are you to judge The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church?

Does it appear non-sequitur? It likely should.
So why do I resound like the clanging gong that has no love? You have heard of Maccheavelli? His is the clanging gong of these secular thinkers.

What teaching is it that you believe needs to resound like the secularist’s gong? Is not God’s design and plan the tour schedule for which you should sign up? What fragile and weak argument from radical individualism has you certain The Holy Spirit is not guiding the church founded by Jesus?

You need not answer any of these questions I present, and certainly not publicly, nor to me. Please consider them before you step away from the surety of the Sacraments, the ordinary means of grace. I would not recommend the roulette game of salvation played after abandoning these gifts from Jesus.

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Have you not found any biblical evidence, or do you interpret the biblical evidence differently? Jesus left us a Church, not a Bible. The (Catholic) Church gave us the Bible. Jesus meant for the Church to be our final authority, He meant for the Church to guide the sheep, which includes interpretation of Scripture. Has God given all of us the infallibility that He gave the Pope when making pronouncements about the faith? Do we all have infallible interpretations of Scripture? If so, why are there so many different and even some contradicting interpretations? If not, how do you know you can trust your own or your pastor’s interpretation of Scripture?

Nobody can force you to be Catholic, ultimately that decision is up to you.

You say you became “Christian/protestant”. Catholics are Christians. In fact, Catholics are the first Christians.

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People I’m not trying to argue or to degrade the Catholic church. Am I not a brother in christ? I just have questions.
I’m still linked to the Catholic church and I just want answers about what the Catholic church teaches about these things.

[quote=“dgamboau518, post:1, topic:464165, full:true”]I was born to faithful Catholic parents and raise in the Catholic church. When I was 19 I decided to leave and become a Christian/protestant. Most of my family are still Catholics and we have been discussing different topics on which we have different views.

I wanted to ask you guys what implies to leave the Catholic church I’m terms of salvation?

People have said to me to keep in mind I’m leaving the sacraments and because of that I can’t be saved, but I haven’t found any biblical evidence for that. I believe in Christ as my saviour and I have confessed that as the bible says we have to.
Thank you in advance for your answers.[/quote]
Once we’ve reached the age of adulthood, our reason for staying in the Church should be because we believe in her; in her basic goodness, in the truth of her teachings. We aren’t being true to ourselves or God if we practice our faith strictly out of fear. I came back to the Church as I finally came to recognize and appreciate her wisdom. Meanwhile God is pleased with our faith, such as it may be at any point, especially as we continue to seek Him/Truth with it.

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Well spoken wise words.

7 Gifts of the Holy Spirit

Wisdom
Understanding
Counsel
Fortitude
Knowledge
Piety
“Fear of the Lord”

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If you have decided to become a Protestant, you should be able to explain what exactly you are protesting against the Catholic Church. Ultimately, you must search for and follow the Truth. Catholics believe the true church founded by Jesus Christ and that has the fullness of faith is the Catholic Church. With prayer, study, and discernment, and especially if raised a Catholic, you are obliged to follow your conscience to the Truth. That’s true for all people. That’s really the only answer that one can give to you.
So–what are you protesting?

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Well I don’t consider myself a protestant or follower of anyh religion. I learned that most Catholics would consider me that just for leaving the Catholic church so I just wanted to make it simple to understand.

“Well I don’t consider myself a protestant or follower of anyh religion.“

Are you saying you’ve moved past being a Christian/protestant? So you’re on your own now, picking and choosing what tenets seem reasonable to you? Happy you’re searching, hope you find the truth, looking in the right place. :slightly_smiling_face:

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The type of punishment, if any, that you deserve for leaving the Catholic Church depends on what you knew (believed in your heart) at the time concerning our Lord Jesus Christ and his Catholic Church, as Jesus said, “And that servant who knew his master’s will, but did not make ready or act according to his will, shall receive a severe beating. But he who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, shall receive a light beating.” (Luke 12:47-48) Did you leave in good conscience? If you were confused about the true nature of our Lord Jesus Christ and his Catholic Church and left it, thinking that that was what God wanted you to do, then your leaving was a good and salvific thing.

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Yes, fear of the Lord is healthy and good, especially as it transitions to love of the Lord, our highest goal, where fear is eventually “cast out”. But to base our faith on fear alone, to be afraid of doing or not doing this or that act -without actually being convicted of the truth regarding the act- is superstition, neurosis, and just plain disingenuous-and leads to nothing good.

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True, but faith is both a gift and an act of courage, for one thing. I didn’t find the faith until after I left it, seeking the “somewhere”, to start, on my own. I know, that’s me-and we’re not all the same; I looked in many areas, not all Christian. But I’ve known so many long-term luke-warm or weak Catholics whose words seem to reveal that fear is the main reason they stayed-and that reveals a lack of knowledge of God’s nature IMO.

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Read one book. Trent Horn’s “Why We’re Catholic”. Then, come back with your questions.

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Couldn’t resist misquoting Tarkin.

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LOL :rofl::rofl:

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Fear of God is not being afraid He will abandon us, it is quite the opposite. Fear of eternal punishment is sufficient in terms of salvation. This is not what is to be understood as the fear of God gifted by The Spirit. Neither is the legalistic implication of gaining salvation by fear of eternal punishment a reflection of what the church teaches. May God rectify any parish where such is a primary instruction in the faith. Even moreso may it even be Napoleon who comes to “correct” any religious who practice clericalism with such a stick for “sticking up” the faithful.
Truth must be taught, in love.
So recommending a year off from catholicism to see if the grass is greener indicates there is enough fertilizer in the lawn to wear waders into that green muck. The ordinary means is the truth.
Certainly full knowledge is required for mortal sin, but leaving the faith is grave matter and should never be encouraged. Missing Mass Obligation, Sunday, and even the fourth week of Advent Sunday when Christmas is Monday remains grave matter.
Perhaps my idea of a drive-up Eucharist mass for those with so many more important things to get done should be advanced to simplify our relationship with Christ and His Church?

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Catholics who leave the Church and drift to no religion typically have little understanding of what the Catholic Church teaches. That’s often not their fault, at least initially, but we all eventually have to grow up and grapple with such things ourselves. OP, you might consider reading the works of Scott Hahn, or even something like Thomas Merton’'s “Seven Story Mountain.” The Youtube videos of EWTNs “The Journey Home” are also fascinating–a wide variety of people, from all faiths and no faith, including former Catholic “re-verts,” tell their stories about returning to the Catholic Church.

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